Authorhousefraud

D
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I'm writing this not only for myself, but for the thousand of published authors who have been fraudulently delt with but 1st books, now Authorhouse. There is no doubt in my mind that this company has been pocketing royalties that rightly belong to only god knows how many authors published by them.

I have one question. I only ask you as the reader to use your own logic. What are the chances of any product, whether it's good or bad. A product that's being advertised on at least fifteen, probably more like thirty web sites. Web sites in the United States and in the UK, of never being purchased by anyone, at least once??? If you take a few minutes and check out a number of web sites on AOL and Yahoo. You will find some very interesting reading.

Responses

  • We
    Wes LeRoy Nov 14, 2008
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    Knowing that books in distribution have a bar code and an ISBN, I think it's a stretch to say a publishing company is witholding royalties from authors. Publishing companies only track sales of your book when they are sold through the publisher. If your book sells at another retailer such as Barnes & Noble or Amazon.com, those sales are tracked by the distributor such as Ingram or Baker & Taylor. When a book sells, the bar code and ISBN are the tracking pieces of the sale. Your publisher would have no idea how many books you've sold through other retailers until the distributor posted your sales activity to the publisher, which with AuthorHouse is every quarter. If you are upset about retail sales royalties, you shouldn't be upset with AuthorHouse. Check with your distributor. It sounds like that's where you need to start, as a publisher only pays royalties based on the sales numbers they receive from distributors.

    0 Votes
  • Em
    emmy Nov 23, 2008
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    If the book was written anything like this review, then I absolutely believe that no one bought the book.

    1 Votes
  • No
    no paid royalties authorhouse Apr 05, 2009
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    4-5-2009 I furthrer disagree with your comment because I know that AuthorHouse is full of bad and that's why they were sued in a libel courts last year and maybe soon with the help of the attorney general's office they will be sued for stealing from their own authors. I wait for that!!!

    0 Votes
  • No
    no paid royalties Apr 06, 2009

    4--06-09 Only hope that the attorney general does a good investigation on AuthorHouse because publishers like this shouldn't be in business!!!

    3 Votes
  • Cl
    cLc Apr 06, 2009

    I just was told today that I'd only be receiving $1.00 and something off of each book. I paid 2300.00 for services and I'm only getting 1.00 somethign from each book?

    0 Votes
  • No
    No paid royalties Apr 06, 2009

    To clc from no paid royalties. I agree with you I received 3-4 royalties from Authorhouse each one was 2.75-3.44 that company is fraud. I only wish the attorney general does a full investigation and then the authors should receive compensation from that!

    0 Votes
  • Ad
    Adrienna Jun 06, 2009

    I have shown on my statements with AuthorHouse from other vendors and got my royalties. I am sorry to hear that. Yet, if you independently publish, how would you keep up with your royalties from other bookstores, distributors, and most of us go by their records to get paid.

    Royalties are what you choose as an author, 5-20%, I have contest this in the past...since we pay them a fee up front for our books to be published, then only get one of these options as royalties. This is why you have to cut the middle person out and learn to do it yourself or keep paying self-publishing costs or find a traditional publisher (very difficult these days).

    Keep up with it,
    Adrienna
    www.adriennaturner.webs.com
    www.dreams4more.com

    1 Votes
  • Ma
    Marie Jun 09, 2009

    I have a manuscript I am currently 3/4 finished with. It is a romance/suspense novel. I am a first time writer. I mistakenly got in contact with Authorhouse and a guy named Kristopher Kmitta about my book. Now, I get constant phone calls and emails from him wanting to publish my book. I read this and know now that I wouldn't let them do it. I need advice. I want someone reputable to review my manuscript, who would anyone suggest that isn't a rip off or will charge them an arm and a leg for just reading over it?

    0 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy Jun 17, 2009
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    cLc,

    Why would you be upset with AuthorHouse about your royalty rate? YOU were the one who chose your royalty rate, not AuthorHouse. They are one of the few self-publishers that actually give you the freedom to set your own price. It's tough to blame someone else for your own negligence!

    0 Votes
  • No paid royalties to clc you don't even know what my situation is with AuthorHouse so maybe my future business with them is no concern to you. And again one day that company is going to pay for all the wrong doings it has done to the many authors it has and that will be a blessing in the sky!!!

    0 Votes
  • Br
    BRP Jul 10, 2009

    Before Author House merged with iUniverse I chose iUniverse, not knowing this was going to be the future of this company. I regret choosing iUniverse now, as I've had problems with them and fear that if they do ever get a book done I won't get paid from sales, as others are complaining about. The number of times this company has contradicted itself and changed personnel it has just not gone well and I'd never use them again or recommend them. Also, their editing was amateur, definitely not worth what I paid for it. I could've done it myself better but thought by paying them I was saving myself time. Wrong! Redoing their job was very time consuming. It has made me suspicious of the entire self publishing industry.

    1 Votes
  • Es
    Esco Jul 17, 2009

    I am so confused now. I want my book published but there is so many negative comments not sure if I should move forward with them.

    0 Votes
  • Je
    JENNLWOOD Jul 23, 2009
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    Well, My book just went up for sale in May 2009. "Bath time bears have so much fun", and I'm constantly concerned about the royalties situation. I know for a fact I have sold at leats a minimum of 100 copies so I am awaiting my first statement from them. I read somewhere that if you disagree with Authorhouse's account of sales, you call the distributor directly and they will give you an actual number of copies sold, and Authorhouse will mail you the amount they did not pay, But after doing some reading I find they (the distributor) can be to blame too. I guess if I'm taken advantage of my Lawyer will get a call too.

    0 Votes
  • Tk
    TK Brick Aug 24, 2009

    I agree totally.

    Author house is a big SCAM! I live in Nashville, TN and decided to take a trip to see if there was an actual building. Like everyone else I fell for the lure of vanity. Hence the word. They were surprised to seem me show up a day earily. I sat in a glass room for two hours before the guy (can't remember his name, sorry) finally showed up. So I asked to see the rest of the offices and get to meet the staff since we were going to working together. He refused not once but three times and kept changing the subject. I'll admit. I ignored the warning signs and plopped down 1, 000 for my first three books of Poetry. Once they got my money, they would never return my many phone calls. Nothing but dead silence for months and I never herd from them again.

    As I was driving back to Nashville that day, I had a sinking pit in my stomach and kept hearing the little voice of my vanity saying over and over..."SUCKER."

    Please allow me to give my fellow writers some sound advice.

    Anything over the internet that requires a payment of some kind, Always type in the words "SCAM" after it. You will be surprised at what slithers out from under that word.

    William
    Nashville, TN

    0 Votes
  • Ma
    marta negron Aug 25, 2009

    I agree with every bad comment that anyone have about authorhouse, that company is a very unprofesional one, I myself have bad experience with that company, and I will never recomend no one to do bussiness with that company.

    -3 Votes
  • Be
    BeeDee Sep 29, 2009

    With so many complaints about Authorhouse, I would like to ask what I feel everyone wants to know; and that is "which self-publishing company is actually worth their weight in salt?" Can anyone recommend one that has actually worked for them? I have heard amazing things about Infinity, and have met one of the authors (a lawyer) who have published through them, and was most content with the outcome. However, they(Infinity) does not publish children's books, under 60 pages at this time, and that is why Authorhouse sounded good. Alas, after these comments they certainly don't anymore. Any suggestions for a company to publish a children's book that has already been illustrated, professionally editted, and formatted?

    0 Votes
  • Ma
    MariaDublin Sep 30, 2009

    People, people, people!!! Like actors and models with talent agencies, writers should never have to PAY one CENT to get their books published! Any legitimate and reputable publishing house will pay YOU and will have you sign a true contract. No real author has to pay anything to get a book published. These vanity publishing houses are a crock and a scam. If your book is really good and first-rate, it will eventually get published by a REAL firm. If not, well . . .

    0 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy Sep 30, 2009
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    Tell that to the thousands of authors with great stories and ideas who don't have the "open door" to traditional publishing. I would venture to say that less than 1% of all authors are signed traditionally. This has nothing to do with your writing quality, but rather whether a publisher thinks they can recoup the thousands of dollars they put into mass printing of your book. It's a "risk/reward" issue that unfortunately is the rule in publishing. Unless you have sold thousands of copies of your book, or are a celebrity/politician who can sell books off of your name alone, traditional publishers aren't typically willing to take the risk of an unproven/unknown author. It would be great if a publisher would pay you an advance based on your writing skill, but the publishing world doesn't work that way. With self-publishing, you can build a name for yourself, prove that your book is marketable and in demand while profiting from your sales and bridge the gap that you may face now. This may give you the credibility you need to be signed traditionally. So why not do both? Most self-publishers have an open-ended/non-exclusive agreement so that if you are picked up traditionally, you can take your book with you.

    Also, it's important to note that even if you are signed traditionally, you will still be doing the vast majority of your own marketing. There has been a long-standing myth that a publisher will market your book for you. That couldn't be further from the truth. Again, this is due to risk/reward. A traditional publisher has a marketing budget and only spreads that across their best-performing authors, just as you and I would do if we owned our own traditional publishing company.

    Many of the larger self-publishers do everything a traditional publisher does. The only difference is that they don't take the rights to your book, don't take 1-2 years to bring your book to market, pay much higher royalties and you maintain creative control of your book.

    I hope this helps, as I hate seeing authors sit around for months (or years) waiting to get signed when they'd have a better chance of hitting the lottery. The traditional publishing model is definitely broken and does not bode well for unknown authors.

    3 Votes
  • Gl
    Glory Spates Oct 14, 2009

    Authors pay for different services from vanity publishers. Such as, ISBN numbers, Copyright, to have your book downloaded into book formats, to have the book covers designed, for the electronic software they use for their web pages such as adobe e-book reader, for soft cover book covers, for hard cover book covers, to do the artwork on the book cover, editorial services, and more. All these services cost money and are what authors are actually paying for, not the publishing itself. True enough, vanity publishers will put your book on their webpage and will give you a personal web page to sell your work on or where you can put a link onto Amazon or EBay. These are the things that are included in the packaging plan. You can choose the plans you want. The more you can get the things listed above yourself instead of hiring a vanity staff to do it, the cheaper the plans will be, because you want need them to do those things for you.

    Before the vanity publishers set a price, they find out how much a print on Demand Company and/or Distribution Company; which is the same thing, will cost them to send your manuscript in a file to them and have it printed and bind according to the amount of pages in the manuscript. Of course the more copies that are printed at one time of the book, the cheaper the printing of the book will cost. Vanity publishers base your book at selling one at a time and it cost more to print just one book at a time. They know some author just can’t afford to have their works printed in bulks. Then authors have to pay for soft covers or hard covers of their books along with the printing and the bill will go up, and you have to choose one or the other, or else just use electronic book form e-book, then you will not have to pay for book covers to be printed out and the book will be cheaper for the customer and will cut the printing cost out. If the printing company or should I say distribution company charges $7.00 to print out and bind a 200 page manuscript then the publishers are going to set the book at an extra $7.00 so that they and the author can make some money off the book and so the book will be set at a $14.00 price, whereas an electronic or e-book will only be $7.00. So every time a customer purchases the book, they will be paying for the printing and for the fee the vanity publishers charge so that the vanity publishers and author can make some money, but the author will only get royalties off of the $7.00 only which will be about 7% - 25% of the $7.00 every time a customer purchase the book and the other $7.00 goes directly to the print on demand company or distribution company time the customers credit card and/or debit card are authorized. Customers also have to pay the shipping and handling fees too. The print on demand and/or distribution company are the ones who take orders directly from the vanity publishing website and print out the books and send them to your customers, not the vanity publishers. Then the print on demand and/or distribution companies sends vanity publishers statements every 3 to 4 months of how much your book has sold.

    Authors can bypass the vanity companies which are the middle man and go straight to the print on demand companies or distribution or printing company of their choice. Either way, print on demand will charge their fees and will set your fee to the other half and your customers will be paying for both fees plus the shipping and handling. Unless the author have five-hundred of the books or more printed in bulks and then the books will be about $3.00 to print in a bulk and you will pay this to the printing company up front. Then you can set your on prices for your books and have the printing company print out whatever you have for the price along with the manuscript which will be printed on the back cover of your book and you can have the books stored in a storage or in the trunk of your car, and charge customer shipping and handling and then ship the books out yourself to your customers. That’s real self-publishing there.

    Also authors can pay for advertising and marketing packets from vanity publishers which are separate from the actual publishing process. Advertising and marketing packets have different prices as well, but the more you can do on your own, the cheaper the plans will be for you, because you will not need to purchase all those things from them.

    In real self publishing, authors do all of those things for themselves by cutting out the middle man which is the vanity publishers and just go to a print on demand printing company or a printing company and have their books printed out all at one time. Like I said, to have a printing company to print a lot of books for you all at one time is way cheaper than having them print the book out one at a time for customers, which is print on demand. But some authors can’t afford to pay the money upfront to have such a thing done.

    Subsidy publishing companies does all these things for you all in one set price for a contract for about five years, but they charge $17, 000.00 - 25, 000.00 in up front fees to do so depending on your manuscript size and so forth. The advertising and marketing is included in the fee and they do everything for you including the copy editing. At that point, they claim for the money that you have paid them, they will have your books put in different newspapers and send them to news stations if your book qualify for it so your can be on the news, talk shows or radio. Also if you provide them with a mailing list of your family, friends and any other people you know and they will send them out flyers, brochures, catalogs of your book and notify them of your book signings and book readings. After the contract is over, you can purchase the agreed print on demand books that they agreed to have printed in the contract at a discount price, if you do not purchase the discounted print on demand book, then they destroy the idea of printing any more of your books, because the contract will have ended. They use a print on demand printing company and Distribution Company too.

    This is where vanity publishers comes in at, because a lot of people cannot afford $25, 000.00 and so authors only pay for the services that they need and weed out those that they can do for themselves including advertising and marketing. But subsidy companies don’t play that. It’s the whole fee that is due for all the service they believe you need. For what subsidy publishers can do for you, you can get done at a vanity publisher for cheaper and only pick out the services that you need.

    Read up on POD printing or print on demand printing companies.

    Traditional publishing companies may or may not give authors money upfront. Some authors receive zero money upfront and these are real publishers, some authors receive only $250.00 – to $500.00 and just maybe $1000.00 or $2, 000.00, if you think I am joking look in the Writers Market and see what publishers are offering. Advances are a lot less than vanity publishers and they can range from 7% royalties for the first 5 thousand copies sold, 10% royalties for the next 10 thousand copies sold and 12% there on after while the book is selling. But if the traditional publishers gave you money up front an advance, you want see a dime of those earned royalties until your book has paid back the money that they gave you upfront. When that little $250.00 – $2, 500.00 is paid back with your royalties; your percentage when customers have purchased your book, then publishers will start sending you a quarterly statement of every 3 to 4 months whenever their statement system generates on. Plus they keep the rights to your books for a duration of time.

    Literary Agent talk money to traditional publishers, they are your lawyers and can get you starting out at least $45, 000.00 for your first book. But it’s like this, unless you get a legitimate Literary Agent to represent you, to me self-publishing is a better choice for un-published, unknown and new authors, even vanity publishing is a better choice for such authors. For the rich, subsidy publishing is the choice; because they want have to lift a finger after they have written their books. So if authors have tried several times to get their books published by traditional publishers and have tried to get a legitimate literary agent and fail, go for it. Only 1% authors achieve that traditional publishing success. I just wouldn’t keep waste my time with traditional publishers nor legitimate literary agents. Because they make up all kinds of excuses as to why they can’t publish your work and literary agents make up all kinds of reasons why they can’t represent you and a lot of the time, it’s because they are bombarded with other works. I have read a lot of traditional published books and vanity, subsidy and self-published books by authors and they are all the same. There are bad books by traditional published author and good books by traditional published authors and the same with vanity, subsidy and self-published authors. If it’s a good story, then don’t keep begging traditional publishers and literary agents, the story needs to be read and enjoyed, so publish it. Focus on getting people hooked on your works, so you can build your audience. You know what this means; the money will follow

    1 Votes
  • Gl
    Glory Spates Oct 14, 2009

    Anybody who published through a vanity publisher, I recommend to not depend on vanity publishers to sell your work, because that is not what they are about. They are about providing services to you that helps you get the book finished, because vanity publishers know that self-publishing alone can be absorbent and exhausting for authors. Vanity publishers provides a link from their webpage directly to the print on demand and/or distribution company so those printing companies can print your book out and then ship it directly to your customers. Vanity publishing companies are also nice enough to provide a page in which authors who use their services books will also be available on their webpage and people can buy the book there too, it’s only for authors’ convenience and some even give their authors a personal webpage where they can put a link to bookstores so that customers can purchase there books.

    Authors should build a nice webpage and get a domain name, and put your website into the search engines and also pay per click options. Because this is really the way that it should be done when authors go through a vanity, subsidy and when people self-publish their books.

    Authors can also use paypal.com and after three months you apply for a debit card, your customer don’t need an account to use Paypal credit card system on your website and you can even log on to paypal.com and charge peoples credit and debit cards yourself. This way customers can buy the book directly from you. You can use print on demand too, or you can have books printed out and stocked in the trunk of your car and ship them directly to your customers. If you use e-books, customers can purchase directly from your webpage and you keep all the earnings. Authors can give there readers choices on their web pages as to what bookstores they want to purchase their books from, by putting more than one bookstore link on their webpage. Be that as it may, Authors should have their books listed in as many online bookstores as possible. Because online bookstores focus on selling book. It's as simple as that.

    1 Votes
  • Ps
    pstemie Oct 16, 2009

    i paid author house to print and edit my book. it has been a nightmare. the issue that has me very upset today is a 10 million e-mail program that cost me about 1, 700 dollars. they say it produced 5, 000 clicks however my web site provider shows only 380 clicks. be very careful!!!

    1 Votes
  • St
    stemborowski Nov 21, 2009

    i too have problems with authorhouse. they are all about taking your money . the support is very poor and if they screw up it's a big fight to fix it. they want to charge you more money!!!. they want to do everything by computer however. their technology is not compatible with vista which is a big problem. plus if you google autherhouse is takes you to their web site thats all about self publishing, not the sale of your book. their e books are a great idea however good luck down loading it. i advise anyone with a problem file a complaint with the better business b. i also paid the 1, 700 dollars to edit my book however they can not spell therefore i need to pay more money to correct issues they screwed up. if they will not deal. file a law suit in small claims court in the county you live. do not give up! poor books sales may not be a good reason for a law suit, but paying for editing and spelling issues may be!

    1 Votes
  • Ni
    Nissitissit Witch Dec 23, 2009

    Authorhose srews it's athors on the price of their book. I can go on line and by new copies of my book from discount book stores for $5, pay $350 shipping and still get the book $4 cheaper than when I order them in lots of 100 from Authorhouse. How can I sell my book on something like e-bay when it costs me $12.50 a book to get in my hand and Authorhouse is selling it through fake bookstores for $5.00. Also I have had about 30 people tell me they bought the book on line and so far Authorhouse shows I have sold 5 in two years.

    0 Votes
  • Te
    Temper18 Jan 10, 2010

    I had a book published in march 2005, that many years "think" I'd get paid "huuah" about 86 cents or less per copy.
    Out of about 5 years around 10 dollars, yes I've been robbed.
    Look over the net and my book is in all the stores even in some over-seas store. I need to get paid. Calvin B.

    0 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy Jan 10, 2010
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    Your book isn't in an online store's actual inventory. It's in a "virtual" inventory because it's printed "on demand" as it's ordered. It's a marketing ploy used by online book stores for years. It builds urgency, as an online store may show limited copies of your book. If someone were on the fence in regards to purchasing your book, they may pull the trigger before the limited inventory "runs out". The online retailer knows that it only takes a few days to print a book and have it in your buyer's hand, so the buyer has no idea it isn't really in stock.

    2 Votes
  • Re
    renj Feb 18, 2010

    I understand that there are some people complaining with authorhouse's services, but compared to authors have had great experiences with authorhouse, only few are complaining i can even count it using my fingers.. All I can say is that they don't know what they are talking about. To be safe, think first before you do anything stupid and you should be responsible enough if you encounter such problem like this one. Don't blame it to self-publishing company. OK!

    0 Votes
  • Sm
    SmarterThanYou Mar 17, 2010

    You guys keep on complaining about your royalties but you don't do anything to advertise your books. Yeah, your books are in online bookstores but people won't buy them if they don't know about them. AuthorHouse won't advertise your book for you. It's either you ask AuthorHouse to market your book for you or you will have to do it yourself.


    Why do you blame AuthorHouse if you don't get your royalties? Do you even have proof that they scammed you and stole your money?

    Lastly, DO YOU THINK IT'S FREE TO HAVE YOUR BOOKS PRINTED? NOTHING IS FREE IN THIS WORLD! THEY HAVE TO WORK WITH SOMETHING!!

    0 Votes
  • Ge
    GeminiPoetess Apr 09, 2010

    I have read every single comment and/or complaint here. I have to say that the comments and suggestions Wes Leroy, Glory Spates, SmarterThanYou have been most thought provoking. I am writing a book of poetry, and I decided to do some research before sending any information to any company. In the last century or so creativity has been lacking. The titles and story lines of most book do not scream out ..."BUY ME, I'M WORTH IT!!!". But alas, everyone one has something to offer, because there is always someone else...Someone else like "you", who can relate with your story or point of view. Like the Bible says in Ecclesiastes 1:9-10 :

    [ 9)What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun. 10)Is there anything of which one might say, "See this, it is new "? Already it has existed for ages Which were before us.]

    Therefore I say, thank you all. For the complaints and the comments. For God is the only one in whom I shall put my trust and my faith. If I am supposed to be an author, it will happen, but not without hard work on my pat and not without God's blessing in my life. Again, thank you all. :)

    ~GeminiPoetess~

    1 Votes
  • Da
    david robinson Apr 14, 2010
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    Unfortunately, I had a book published by Authorhouse. They told me I could set the retail price. The print cost per book was $6.50 each. I wanted $2.00 in royalty per book. The book should have retailed for $8.50. Authorhouse retailed it for $14 plus dollars, each. Because of the length of the book. Their fraudulantly exagerated retail placed the book far above what the average person would pay for it. Even so, copies were sold. and the royalties? WHAT ROYALTIES? STAY AWAY FROM THESE PEOPLE. IF YOU CAN'T GET A PUBLISHER TO PICK UP YOUR MANUSCRIPT AND STILL WANT IT PUBLISHED. FIND A REPUTABLE PRINTING COMPANY, COME TO AN AGREEMENT. HAVE THEM PUBLISH IT. PURCHASE YOUR BOOK IN VOLUME. THEN GO AROUND TO EVERY BOOK STORE IN YOUR AREA AND ASK THEM TO HANDLE IT. FORGET AUTHORHOUSE. AND FORGET ABOUT HAVING CONSUMER PROTECTION, FAIR TRADE COMMISSION OR ANY ATTORNY GENERAL'S OFFICE GOING AFTER THEM. THESE ORGANIZATIONS AND ATT: GEN'S ARE NOW IN THE BUSINESS OF PROTECTING THOSE WHO PREY ON THE AMERICAN PUBLIC.

    -2 Votes
  • Bo
    bowgs May 16, 2010

    I am an Authorhouse author (Martin Mallory Solves a Mystery) and I decided to test if Authorhouse were reporting accurate sales figures by having 2 of my friends purchase a copy each in January this year (2010). Only one showed on my quarterly sales report, so yes be afraid, very afraid...I will never trust them again

    0 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy May 16, 2010
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    bowgs,

    First quarter reports aren't generally mailed out until the end of May (60 days after the quarter ends). If your friends purchased in January 2010, those sales would be on your end of May royalty report.

    If you have received the report already, which source did your friends by from? Did they buy from a retailer or directly from AuthorHouse.com?

    If you can answer those questions, I'll do some digging for you and see what I can come up with. Thanks!

    1 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy May 16, 2010
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    david robinson,

    Did you ever realize that your book had to sell for over $14 not because of the size, but because the book stores and online sites get 35%-50% of the profit when they buy your book at a wholesale price and sell it for you? They are a middleman standing between you and the person who wishes to buy your book, so they want paid for helping you to sell your book.

    If your buyer purchases from a retailer, there is not enough profit at $8.50 to cover the $6.50 print cost, give the retailer 35%-50% and STILL pay you a royalty. It seems that you are misinformed on how the process of retail sales works. I hope this helps you to understand that AuthorHouse is not at fault for requiring your book to be sold at a higher price through retailers than at AuthorHouse.com. Is this understandable?

    1 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy May 16, 2010
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    David,

    You claim that AuthorHouse overpriced your book by a large margin. However, what you forgot to tell us is what percentage of royalty YOU chose for your book. Obviously, AuthorHouse allows you to set a retail price that makes you 5%-50% royalties and that royalty rate affects your retail price. For the benefit of all those that are following this thread, please reply back with what royalty rate you chose. I'm sure we're all curious to see if you set your price too high, when you had the opportunity to choose a lower royalty rate and in turn, a lower retail price. Please let us know. It's not quite right to blame AuthorHouse for overpricing your book if you, indeed, did choose a higher royalty rate and retail price when you didn't have to. However, I'll reserve judgment until you provide the royalty percentage you chose. Thanks!

    1 Votes
  • Da
    david robinson May 17, 2010
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    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    We can go on and on with this. But Authorhouse has a long history that supports my position. You work for these scam artists. So, no matter what I and hundreds if not thousands of others say. You're right and we're all wrong. Eventually, your actions will catch up with you.Then once again, Authorhouse will have to change its name or buy another on demand company. So they can continue screwing the people who trusted them. I, like all who have been taken by you and your partners in crime, will never do business with you again, or recommend Authorhouse to anyone. The more you keep stating your case only continues to build a stronger and larger case against Authorhouse. One more point of interest. I received an email a few weeks ago from someone else you ripped off. She said that the Indiana state attorney general's office has at least fifty complaints against Authorhouse but refuses to act. True or not? I' wouldn't be surprised if it were. I'm done replying to your pro Authorhouse crap. I and thousands of others know what you are. Here's hoping you receive all the bad fortune you and your partners truly deserve. If this country had a just legal system. Authorhouse and companies like them, would be out of business and a few individuals would be serving prison terms. But then again, look at Publishers Clearing House. Just another scam that has been allowed to continue. You guys should get together each year and have a convention. END OF STORY.

    PS. And don't give me that what did I add for my royalty crap. During my last conversation with Authorhouse I asked the guy I was talking to what would be acceptable. I added what he recommended. You can go on and on with your untruths. Why not leave Authorhouse and go into politics. You'd fit in nicely

    -2 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy May 17, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    David,

    I won't get into the unprofessional name calling that you seem to favor. I'm simply pointing out the fact that you show up on this complaint board, accuse AuthorHouse of overpricing your book and then seem to deflect the blame on pricing to the publisher.

    When you decided to price your book higher than you needed to and then come on here and blast AuthorHouse for overpricing your book, that seems to be quite an oxymoron. If you did not do your homework and research what other books similar in page count in your genre were selling for, then I still am not sure how that would be seen as AuthorHouse's fault. You may not be happy with your selling price, but that's what happens when you choose a 30% royalty for your book instead of a lower one where you could have priced it lower.

    Is anyone else reading this and seeing my point?

    1 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy May 17, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    For all those that are worried about these online complaints about AuthorHouse, let me state it again:

    AuthorHouse is the largest self-publishing company in the world, and publishes more books by far than any other company. They've published over 70, 000 titles with their closest competitor publishing about 30, 000. With more business comes more opportunities for complaints. They couldn't be the largest and most experienced in the world if they were truly the way we're portrayed by some. It's like saying that because McDonald's has more complaints than my local diner that I should stop eating at McDonald's.

    In the last 3 years, the AuthorHouse brand of Author Solutions, Inc. had about 70 complaints to the Better Business Bureau. If they were publishing few books, that would be unacceptable. But over that 3 year period of time, they published nearly 25, 000 titles. 70 complaints divided by 22, 000 titles published tells me that less than 1% of our authors are unsatisfied. Companies like McDonald's and Disney that are the leaders in their industries DREAM of having less than 1% of their customers complain.

    The point is, take these things with a grain of salt. When someone is happy with a company, they might tell a few people. When they are unhappy, they tell EVERYONE. Not to mention that many of these people that complain online will work for other publishing companies which is why they choose to remain anonymous. They're hoping that they scare you off from publishing with us because you're naive and not smart enough to do your own fact-checking. You and I both know that's not the case, but if they can sway even a few people away from AuthorHouse, they've done their job.

    2 Votes
  • Da
    Daniel Asamota May 20, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I have a bone to pick with AuthorHouse too because my book is on just about every major site there is and AuthorHouse has not paid me a nickle! For my next book I switched over to Xlibris hoping to avoid the same crap I experienced with AH. But lo and behold, guess who finalized the deal for Xlibris earlier this year? None other than those thieving crooks, AUTHORHOUSE! They've bought up both Xlibris and iUniverse and I guess they can afford it being they're not paying us our royalties! And you up top, you're full of it! You know dam well AuthorHouse makes the deals with the distributors and AuthorHouse is responsible for making certain they get the money we're owed! And if you think for one moment that AuthorHouse as big and well-off as they are is gonna' allow themselves to be screwed by their distributors you're either very stupid or you're working for AuthorHouse yourself! I believe it's the latter, trying to steer us away from the true culprits, AUTHORHOUSE! Forget it fool, coz' I want to testify if that Attorney General needs witnesses! Just tell me where and when and I'll find a way to be there!

    -1 Votes
  • We
    Wes Leroy May 21, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Daniel,

    Thanks for your input. Do you market your book so that people know about it or do you expect people to magically buy an unknown author's work that's buried in with hundreds of thousands of other titles? Your book is a needle in a haystack unless you get out there and market it.

    Publishing is very similar to the music business. If I record a CD in a studio, it doesn't really help unless I'm out doing shows for people so that they know about my cd and can judge whether they like my music. Just because my music CD is available for order at music stores doesn't mean that people are just going to magically know about it or even know it exists. I have to have a firm and effective marketing plan.

    You'd be shocked to see how many great books "die on the vine" because of ineffective marketing campaigns on the author's part. But there are also books that you and I would think are terrible that sell thousands of copies because the author knows exactly who their market is and how to reach them effectively. The marketing aspect of sales far supercedes an author's writing ability because of this.

    1 Votes
  • La
    Launa Jean Ellison May 21, 2010

    I paid authorhouse $1, 082.43 and they did nothing! I sure would like that money back.

    0 Votes
  • Ro
    Rob1981 May 27, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Authorhouse is a publishing services company. They make their money from authors not book buyers and so have no incentive to ensure the books that they publish sell. If you want to be a successful author you need to be published by a traditional publisher. These do not take any money from the author. Instead they make their money from sales of the books. This way the risk is held by the publisher rather than the author. For this reason they are very selective about the books they are willing to publish. A very high standard is required. Getting your book published by a large publishing house is near to impossible unless you have already had success in the past. Even JK Rowling was rejected numerous times for the first Harry Potter book. However, smaller publishers are much more open to submissions from less well established authors and even those writing their first book. An example of a company seeking new authors is Knightstone Publishing. visit http://www.knightstone-publishing.co.uk and take a look.

    0 Votes

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