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Netflix Original Seriesafflicted

1
K Aug 15, 2018 Review updated:

As a severe chronic pain pt,
fibromyalgia, neuropathy, ridiculopathy, failure to fuse back fusion.etc etc trauma; car wreck, anxiety disorder, depression, even had bariatric surgery to try to take weight off my painful body& the people you've chosen for this show propagate the myth that chronic pain is all in the head. Someone truly suffering does not say no to a treatment, would never allow a lived one to give up amazing opportunities and we sure don't make it the topic of every convo. Someone who can't stand electronics, they make her sick, have pain & disable her yet she specifically moves to a place where these things aren't allowed and what does she do? Wears a wireless Mic willingly and exposes her neighbors to it...seriously?Stars friends faces say it all when she speaks...bekah with her mandatory"detox shower" in a desert where water makes dirt mud ...how is that sterile? 90% of these people are huge candidates for the DX; muncheusan syndrome...they like the attention..the procedures...why are no psychologists included in the show? No psychiatrist? These people move more in a day than I ever will, more than any pain patient I've ever seen. It actually pisses me off to watch because of how true chronic pain/undiagnosed patients get treated and here they are getting expensive treatments, special home visits by specialists and not one of them truly seem interested in getting better. Does none of your staff see this?

Responses

  • Ca
    Caroline Kaiser Aug 19, 2018

    I've been watching Afflicted, a Netflix documentary that focuses on the lives of seven people with chronic illnesses such as ME/CFS, multiple chemical sensitivity, and Lyme. Eager to create controversy, the filmmakers decided to cast doubt on the legitimacy of their subjects' conditions. Experts, most of whom never even met those portrayed in the series, suggest time and time again that the origin of these illnesses is in the mind, and that there's no biological basis for the severe symptoms we're looking at. This sense of doubt permeates the series.

    With CFS, the biological basis of the illness has been well established, but the filmmakers apparently didn't know this, or they would like to pretend it's not true. They did interview some top CFS researchers for the series, but that footage was left on the cutting room floor because whatever the researchers said apparently didn't fit with the narrative the filmmakers had decided to pursue. I've also learned that the seven participants were all evaluated for mental illness before the series and they all passed the evaluation . . . so why then suggest again and again that their problems are psychological?

    There was an opportunity to educate people here about the true nature of these illnesses, but the filmmakers preferred to sensationalize instead of look at the science. The people portrayed in the documentary represent a large community of vulnerable, often invisible people who are fighting to be taken seriously by their doctors and everyone else around them. Imagine trying to cope with such skepticism while you're already burdened by difficult symptoms and struggling just to get through another day. It's overwhelming. The makers of Afflicted have done a huge disservice to the chronic illness community.

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