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WPT Great Pyrenees / Dog with Congential Issues

Kenbridge VA, United States Review updated:

I purchased a Great Pyrenees puppy from this breeder in 2012--puppy born on March 5, 2012. The breeder has a contract guaranteeing that the puppy is free from hereditary defects. My puppy always had digestive issues, which I made the breeders aware of early; however, the true disease did not manifest until the puppy was about 1 1/2 years old--he had juvenile renal dysplasia. Basically, his kidneys did not grow or function well as the rest of this majestic dog grew. I was able to keep him alive until October 29, 2014. Once the diagnosis was made, I let the breeder know because this is a congenital issue. The breeder got very defensive and told me it could be other things like Lyme Disease. (I had already spent hundreds of dollars ruling out other things, including Lyme Disease.) She was obviously not very knowledgeable about the breed because when my veterinarian and I did more research, the Great Pyrenees is susceptible to this congenital defect. From viewing the breeder's website, she has done nothing to remedy other buyers from going through this agony. I spent thousands caring for this dog, as well as having him trained to be a therapy dog prior to my knowledge that revealed this terminal condition. I am only fortunate that Toby was in my home where he received the best care until his death. Perhaps the breeder did not know her dogs carried this defect but she does know now! Do NOT support this breeder; she is only out to make a buck and cares very little about the breed and the buyers. Also, if you really want to own a Great Pyrenees and insist on going through a breeder, have the dog guaranteed against juvenile renal dysplasia..it is horrific to experience, both for the dog and the owner.

Py
Nov 06, 2014
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Comments

  • Gl
      Aug 01, 2012
    wpt - charge three times instead of one
    wpt
    United States

    08-01-2012 was charge 3 times on wpt chips 18.20 x 3 for same item7

    0 Votes
  • Wp
      Nov 09, 2014

    While I am very sorry for your loss, I do not feel this is the correct way to go about venting your displeasure with the breeder.

    Yes, the breeder has a contract stating the puppy is free from hereditary defects to the best of her knowledge. The breeder never received a written Veterinarian Certificate of this existing condition. Nowhere in your complaint did you mention that you were offered a replacement puppy out of completely different lines! Even with all the health testing in the world, genetic issues occur. While this breeder strives to produce puppies with good health and longevity, genetics are unpredictable. This is no way to guarantee or predict the genetic behavior of any animal.

    According to Mary H. Whiteley, Ph.D. of DOGenes Inc. “the mode of inheritance of JRD has been widely debated, as this disease can present itself with a wide range of symptoms and pathological findings. Definitive diagnosis of JRD is done by a wedge biopsy which reveals dysplastic lesions, including abnormal ducts, and glomeruli”. No definitive diagnosis is made without a kidney biopsy.

    According to CHIC (canine health information center) and the GPCA (Great Pyrenees Club of American) the testing for Renal Dysplasia isn’t mentioned as a health concern for the Great Pyrenees Breed.

    0 Votes
  • Py
      Nov 12, 2014

    This complaint is NOT true. I purchased a puppy from this breeder 5 years ago and have nothing but great things to say about them! I checked with several breeders (all with 20+ years experience) in regards to testing for renal dysplasia...none of them test for it. Please don't let one untrue complaint sway your decision, contact the breeder and find out for yourself. They are true animal lovers and provide the best for their furry family! As for the statement "she is only out to make a buck", this breeder is retired and receives a monthly retirement check, she breeds because she loves the breed.

    0 Votes
  • Py
      Nov 14, 2014

    Per comment from the actual breeder listed on November 9th above, this is the email she sent me, noting that there is no mention of a replacement, which according to other breeders I have talked with should have been free. This is her response when I initially informed her of Toby's condition:
    I am sorry to hear about Toby. I am quite taken aback by the tone in your email. Do you think I intentionally sold you a puppy knowing that it might have juvenile renal disease?? No, I did not!! I do not know of any Great Pyrenees breeders that tests their breeding stock for Renal Dysplasia. You were provided information on the testing we perform on our breeding stock before you purchased Toby. You have been to our home and witnessed first hand the environment and conditions our dogs are reared in. If I am not mistaken, you approved of our program. I sent you weekly updates and didn't hide the fact that Toby wasn't as large as his littermates. BTW he wasn't half the size of his sisters and by the time he left he was very close to their size. I asked the breeders I purchased puppies from if there were any known problems with their lines and the response I got time after time was "no".

    I recall you had radiographs taken of Toby in June 2012, you told me those came back good. Did you show those radiographs to your new vet?

    Now that this has been brought to my attention, I will not use Toby's parents in our breeding program until more testing has been run. If you want to return Toby, I will take him back and give you a puppy out of different lines.

    I have done some research on this condition and found this condition "can be inherited OR acquired" (ie Mary H. Whiteley, PhD, DOGenes Inc.). Here are a few things that come to mind that Toby could have come in contact with which also causes kidney failure-lymes, leptospirosis and antifreeze. I have also found that the only way to confirm and definitively diagnose renal dysplasia is to take tissue biopsies from both of the dog’s kidneys and submit them to a veterinary pathology laboratory (which you already know).

    If you are looking for someone to blame, by all means blame me. It was something I was unaware of and will now address. It can happen in any breeding program!

    0 Votes
  • Py
      Nov 14, 2014

    Correction: There was a mention of replacement of my dog--but she wanted me to surrender my sick dog back to her that has been part of my family for two years, which she knew I wouldn't do because he was part of my family and I knew he would not receive quality care from her. Her dogs are not family but are all kept in kennels when I visited. She only kept her loved German Shepherds in her house.

    0 Votes
  • Py
      Nov 14, 2014

    The tone in my email is appropriate for what I was experiencing emotionally over the entire two 1/2 years Toby was alive and with me and it was in no way disrespectful--I only contacted her because as a breeder she needed to know so she would have her dogs tested...and as far as testing goes, I had already spent thousands, so of course Lyme Disease and all other conditions had been ruled out; there was no compassion or concern for me or my dog. As in her response, there were radiographs taken of Toby as a small puppy because I have had Great Pyrenees for over 20 years and I knew something was not quite right--this disease did not manifest until later so it did not show up when he was a puppy. This was my initial email to her, verbatim:

    Hello Gloria and Brian,
    I've been waiting a few weeks to write this correspondence because I've been experiencing many highs and lows--especially anger, and I didn't want to write when I was really angry.

    Let me explain:

    After all of Toby's training, I decided to get him a thorough exam (with blood work) before l began taking him around to nursing homes in the area. He didn't seem to be feeling well. Toby has juvenile renal dysplasia--basically chronic renal failure. This is a congenital condition, meaning he was born with it and one of his parents carries the gene. Dogs normally don't start showing symptoms until around 15 months old (for Toby it was around 2 years old). By this time, it is too late, and an animal with juvenile renal dysplasia who begins showing these symptoms has already lost 75% kidney function. If you research this on the internet, you will see that Great Pyrenees is one of the breeds susceptible to this congenital issue. The only other remote possibility, as far as diagnoses go is that he has an autoimmune disorder, which is another congenital problem often seen with overbred dogs. I told Dr Austin (his veterinarian) that Toby was almost 1/2 the size of his littermates and he commented that this alone is often a sign of a congenital problem.

    After hundreds of dollars in medical bills, he is seeing a very good veterinarian who is a great scientist. He moved to WV from CA and both he and his wife are veterinarians. Toby is receiving great care from them. He underwent an ultrasound and it distinctly shows small kidneys that just didn't grow.The only way to know with certainty is to biopsy his kidneys, which I won't because it won't help Toby's treatment; however, a responsible breeder would, knowing that this condition has appeared in a lineage. Instead, Toby gets lots of love from me, along with a homecooked diet. Fortunately, he got to come to a good home where he gets this special treatment. Lifespan is difficult to say. Dr. Austin said it could be from 3 months to a couple years. We are closely monitoring his BUN and creatine levels but have been unsuccessful so far at controlling them. We keep making minor changes to his diet and supplements to see if this will help.

    Being the breeder, you needed to know this information. Here is a dog that has had thousands of dollars in training and medical care that will probably not see his destiny fulfilled. He is a beautiful creature that has become a local celebrity and he will be taken far too soon. I should not have to mention the emotional toll it is having on me. I had almost 13 years with Abby and 2 years for Toby? Yet, his sister, Libby, who is a Pyr mix who isn't from a breeder, is as healthy as can be. Doesn't seem fair, does it?

    Please do the right thing, whatever that is for a breeder.

    0 Votes
  • Py
      Nov 14, 2014

    My initial email to this breeder regarding his condition was respectful but shows the emotional toll on me. Thousands had been spent to rule out other conditions...beginning as a puppy which she acknowledges in her email because she knew I had x-rays taken when he was very young. This is my initial email to the breeder who showed no compassion or concern for either me or my dog:
    Hello Gloria and Brian,
    I've been waiting a few weeks to write this correspondence because I've been experiencing many highs and lows--especially anger, and I didn't want to write when I was really angry.

    Let me explain:

    After all of Toby's training, I decided to get him a thorough exam (with blood work) before l began taking him around to nursing homes in the area. He didn't seem to be feeling well. Toby has juvenile renal dysplasia--basically chronic renal failure. This is a congenital condition, meaning he was born with it and one of his parents carries the gene. Dogs normally don't start showing symptoms until around 15 months old (for Toby it was around 2 years old). By this time, it is too late, and an animal with juvenile renal dysplasia who begins showing these symptoms has already lost 75% kidney function. If you research this on the internet, you will see that Great Pyrenees is one of the breeds susceptible to this congenital issue. The only other remote possibility, as far as diagnoses go is that he has an autoimmune disorder, which is another congenital problem often seen with overbred dogs. I told Dr Austin (his veterinarian) that Toby was almost 1/2 the size of his littermates and he commented that this alone is often a sign of a congenital problem.

    After hundreds of dollars in medical bills, he is seeing a very good veterinarian who is a great scientist. He moved to WV from CA and both he and his wife are veterinarians. Toby is receiving great care from them. He underwent an ultrasound and it distinctly shows small kidneys that just didn't grow.The only way to know with certainty is to biopsy his kidneys, which I won't because it won't help Toby's treatment; however, a responsible breeder would, knowing that this condition has appeared in a lineage. Instead, Toby gets lots of love from me, along with a homecooked diet. Fortunately, he got to come to a good home where he gets this special treatment. Lifespan is difficult to say. Dr. Austin said it could be from 3 months to a couple years. We are closely monitoring his BUN and creatine levels but have been unsuccessful so far at controlling them. We keep making minor changes to his diet and supplements to see if this will help.

    Being the breeder, you needed to know this information. Here is a dog that has had thousands of dollars in training and medical care that will probably not see his destiny fulfilled. He is a beautiful creature that has become a local celebrity and he will be taken far too soon. I should not have to mention the emotional toll it is having on me. I had almost 13 years with Abby and 2 years for Toby? Yet, his sister, Libby, who is a Pyr mix who isn't from a breeder, is as healthy as can be. Doesn't seem fair, does it?

    Please do the right thing, whatever that is for a breeder.

    +1 Votes
  • Ka
      May 19, 2019
    World Poker Tour (WPT) - Customer service nonexistent. Numerous problems
    United States

    Endless problems, no solutions. Requests for help are ignored. Only competence is in billing for the little play that I do get. I cannot find information on tournaments. I'd love site like this that actually works.

    0 Votes

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