The most trusted and popular consumer complaints website
Explore your opportunities! Create an account or Sign In

SunTrustBank / overdraft fees

1 FL, United States Review updated:

Suntrust has repeatedly been pressuring me to "opt in" for overdraft protection. I have repeatedly DECLINED this offer. While checking my checking account online, I found that on 4/28/11 & 5/5/11, Suntrust imposed NSF fees against my account, first at $25 & then $36. I filed an online complaint but Suntrust refuses to reverse these fees. I will be closing the account next week. I also filed a Federal Reserve complaint at the following link and would encourage others to file as well. According to Federal Reserve Rules, The consumer must agree to "opt in" for overdraft protection, the bank cannot do it without the account holders consent. Suntrust has lost my Business for life! http://www.federalreserveconsumerhelp.gov/?District=13

Sort by: UpDate | Rating

Comments

  • Th
      21st of May, 2011
    0 Votes

    did you actually "bounce" the checks?

  • Op
      22nd of May, 2011
    Best Best Advice +4 Votes

    No wonder they are pressuring you to opt for overdraft protection dufus.

  • Te
      24th of May, 2011
    0 Votes

    After filing several complaints re this issue, to Suntrust, they agreed to reimburse ALL NSF fees, A total of $61.00 credited back to my account as of yesterday.

  • Sb
      3rd of Jun, 2011
    -3 Votes

    ellen67,

    Congress recently passed legislation to protect consumers from banks with confusing overdraft policies like the ones detailed in your post. That hasn't stopped the people who work at banks from looking for loopholes in the law.

    So, as outlined in your post, banks now demand that consumers spend all of their time memorizing complex policies regarding different types of transactions or they will still incur some form overdraft charges. Naturally, the banks know that, if they make their overdraft policies sufficiently confusing, they can continue to charge "overdraft fees", "NSF fees", "NSF penalties", etc. They have changed the jargon to avoid the new law, but these are still overdraft fees. If a consumer cries foul, the bank can simply respond as you have in your post: With a torrent of confusing jargon designed to make the consumer look ignorant and at fault.
    ________________________________________________________________________
    To Everone Else:

    For those of you who that have declined overdraft protection: IF YOU'RE BANK CONTINUES TO CHARGE YOU OVERDRAFT FEES, NO MATTER WHAT THEY CALL THEM, COMPLAIN TO THE BANK. IF THEY REFUSE TO REVERSE CHARGES, REPORT THEM TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS IN YOUR STATE OF RESIDENCE, REPORT THEM TO THE FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION, AND REPORT THEM TO THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU. THEN TAKE YOUR BANKING BUSINESS TO ANOTHER BANK. ALSO, CONSULT AN ATTORNEY.

    Ignore the shills, like Ellen, who work for the banks. It was announced just yesterday that Bank of America has agreed to pay $410 million to settle its portion of a federal class-action lawsuit involving excessive overdraft fees on debit cards (see: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/05/24/2232939/bank-of-america-has-deal-to-settle.html). Bank of American was the first to settle among 35 U.S. banks named in the suit, including; JP Morgan, CitiGroup, and Wells Fargo.

    Clearly, consumers pull far more weight here than Ellen would have us believe. Don't let bureaucrats like Ellen discourage you from fighting for your rights.

Post your comment