American Income Lifeail is a fraud!

E
This review was posted by
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Verified customer
Review updated:

I was hired as an agent with a life insurance company called american income life about three weeks ago. after laying out about $490 for licensing and travel up to denver for a week, I started field "training" — without any compensation. during this time, in the midst of my unscheduled and unpaid 12-14 hour days, I consistently witnessed agents lying to prospective clients and prospective new hires. they also require new agents to learn various scripts, word-for-word, before they would release us on our own to start earning income. these scripts were also very misleading in many ways. needless to say, I had some serious problems with this way of doing business...

So, I confronted the issue with my field trainer. his response was simply a pathetic attempt at justification. I even called my dad and asked his advice on how to confront the situation. [that was almost a once-in-a-lifetime thing!] I decided i'd play their game until I could get out on my own, then I would conduct my business in an honest and ethical manner. what a concept!!!

I didn't bring it up again with any managers until after a week and a half in field training. I did, however, make the mistake of mentioning on various occasions to fellow trainee agents that I was not happy about being forced to be dishonest each time I came in contact with a prospect. they seemingly had no issues with it, as they obviously complained to our manager about it.

Then two days ago, I arrived in the office after lunch. louis, my 20-year-old, money hungry manager, tells the other two new agents to leave his office. so i'm left there alone with him as he asks me straight out if I want to work there anymore. I had mixed thoughts on the matter, so I said yes, however, I feel there are some serious issues that need to be addressed. we then talked a few more minutes about all these issues, only for louis to conclude that I was a negative influence on the other trainee's and the office as a whole. and I wasn't willing to work hard enough. [this stems from the fact that I had a serious problem with being dishonest... and because I was unwilling to arrive each morning promptly at 8 am and stay until 9:45 pm; with no compensation.]

I was then impolitely asked to leave because I was unwilling to accept their way of doing business. so, needless to say, not only am I out a job, I just laid out almost $500 for a job that no longer exists. not to mention wasting almost an entire month! you have no idea how badly I desire to see a few life insurance policies paid out... I want to tell everyone I come in contact with about this company, and to make sure you never do business with this organization. you work too hard to waste your money.

I am personally beginning an honesty campaign. something they cannot even comprehend! it goes against their very nature!!! assist me in this fight!

Responses

  • Am
    Amy E. Evans Mar 28, 2018
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I like how Mary Corrion doesn't know how to use an apostrophe correctly. Also, Lawerence Wolf uses caps and exclamations like it is going out of style. Just interviewed there, it is as bad as others have posted.
    Thank's
    HAHA

    0 Votes
  • Ru
    Ruby Carr Aug 01, 2017
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I just had someone to contact me about insurance. They said it was through Craig Credit Union.

    0 Votes
  • An
    Anonymous Local 277 Jul 02, 2017

    Lol, yes these people PREY on unions, CNAs, and families with their script. They tell these people that they have a once a year enrollment period, "which is right now while I'm sitting with you". They say they are working with all these different groups to get the Child Safe Kits to families, which is BS. They are using this as a way to get into the house and then apply high pressure sales tactics to push Insurance on families. Most of the products are not less expensive and offer less financial protection than other products on the market. If you present it to anyone who is willing to research the product they are buying, they see right through the tactic. DO NOT PURCHASE THESE PRODUCTS! There are much better products such as IULs and VULs that offer larger cash growth over time. The WLs offered by AIL gain very little value over time and then they want you to use cash value to purchase a lower face value contract. Who benefits from this! AIL! you want to start your own business? Go to brokers that offer a wide variety of products so that you can better serve the client. Don't fall victim to these people who portray themselves as being Union Members, which they are NOT. They are out only for themselves, nobody else!

    0 Votes
  • Ma
    Matt Beard May 14, 2017
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Hi my name is Matt and I have been nothing but pleased with the way this company has served my family and myself. My agent is awesome and goes out of his way for us. Any commission based job will require you to apply yourself. I don't know about working for them as an employee, but as a customer I'm very satisfied. My agent is very caring and genuine. I've even considered working for them.

    0 Votes
  • Ph
    Phill Seyler Mar 17, 2017
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    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I was a guy desperate for a job. As most of us do, I applied to a ton of jobs on job boards like monster and indeed.com and have a public resume. I not only get one call for an interview, but TWO. They called me twice and thought I was two different people hahahaha. I went to both interviews and passed to the 2nd interview 2 separate times with 2 separate interviewees. No one ever recognized me. They said all this stuff that made me feel special and unique because I made it that far. I got two separate phone calls inviting me to the 3rd round interviews and I told them to schedule me for the 10 am on both phone calls. Man, I bet they were confused as heck hahahaha. Because I went to 2 separate interviews, I could easily see what their diabolical plan was. They were trying to pull a fast one on us. Both interviews went exactly the same and I could tell that I was in no way "special". I ended up looking this company up and saw a lot of negative reviews. I believe I wisely made the right decision to not pursue a position with them.

    0 Votes
  • Ma
    Mama bear 1 Mar 01, 2017
    This comment was posted by
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    Verified customer

    I just have a question for all of you that worked or work for this company. I am wondering about the children's whole life policy. I was looking to purchase coverage for my kids at a low cost in the event of (God forbid) their demise. Recently a friend was witness to his daughter being hit by a car. She is very lucky...she suffered a shattered femur and traumatic brain injury which could have resulted in death. This got me to thinking...what would I do if something like that happened to one of my kids? Aside from losing my mind how would I afford to pay for burial expenses? My father in law just passed away a year ago and the cost of his funeral and burial was around $20, 000. That is alot of money for someone who doesn't have insurance and doesn't have $ in the bank. The policy costs for both kids would be around $30 a month. I think that this is reasonable but am worried about the coverage and payouts (since it is a whole life policy). I don't want this to be a hassle for anyone and I don't want to waste my money. It seems that the only complaints I see have to do with the employment side of the business not the coverage etc. Please let me know.

    0 Votes
  • An
    Anonymous Local 277 Jul 02, 2017

    @Mama bear 1 Call around and shop. Insurance is based off of age and gender primarily. Look into a IUL or VUL because they will build larger cash values over time. Whole life policies are nice, but with their ages they have so many years that the policy could potentially become worth a very large sum that they can borrow against and still keep policy in place!

    0 Votes
  • Ex
    ExAgentSmith Feb 08, 2017

    My Experience with AIL.
    Here are a few points to take into consideration:
    Now I will be the first to admit that prior to working for AIL, I had no sales experience or background. I will also admit that working for AIL taught me that I don't possess (or perhaps that I refuse to adopt) a sales mentality. Of course this is only relevant to this experience. Again, having no other sales experience to compare it to, it would be wrong of me to "bash" the practice of sales and those who have succeeded in it. Another note to point out is that AIL is a large company made up of many different agencies. As such, there isn't one standard operating procedure for the company as a whole. That being said, I still see a lot of similarities between the stories above and my own, similarities that eventually led to me leaving the company.

    I was in need of a job, as my previous job was a contract gig, and it had ended. Finding myself on unemployment and wanting to get back into working as soon as possible, I accepted a phone invitation to an interview with AIL. I understand now that my desperation to work was my first blinding pitfall. I knew that the position was with an insurance company and that it would be for an insurance agent position, so in that regard I was not lied to about that as others have experienced. AIL was in the process of opening a new division in the Portland, Oregon area that would specifically cater to Veterans. Having spent time in the military, this appealed to me and I had thoughts of being able to help other Vets.

    The interview process is as described by others on this site: a 3 part process. I completed all three in one day, the third which gave video presentations on company overviews and testimonials from current employees. I was also introduced to my MGA, Chris LaFond. Chris has done very well for himself. A 20+ year veteran of the company, he has traditionally been what I would refer to as a "fixer": he would travel to other areas and spend time fixing those agencies for the company whose numbers weren't up to par. Now he was tapped to lead this division. He's loud, passionate, and extremely talented with words; all the makings for a great sales leader.

    Upon being offered the job, I took to the task of studying for the licensing exam. Now, here is where some of you will think it unfair, but my fees for this were waived due to the fact that I am a Veteran. I did have to pay for the exam itself, but I was told to keep the receipt so that I could be reimbursed (not through the company, but come tax season). That was an $80 cost and I made sure to pass the test on the first try to avoid having to pay again for a retake. Then, I began studying and memorizing a 7 page script. It had been preferred that I memorize it in 4 days, but I lucked out and had a week as the state of Oregon took it's sweet time to assigned me my producer number. Now it is true that all of this time was unpaid, but I did it from the comfort of my home and so I have no complaints on that.

    Once I had the license and script, next came the filed training. My field trainer and the person I was eventually "coded" to was Travis Vanderberghe, a 14 year veteran of the company. I have nothing bad to say about Travis as he was very patient with my training and always willing to listen to my concerns. When I left the company, the only feeling of guilt I had was having wasted Travis's time. I began to "shadow" Travis on actual appointments for a couple of weeks. At first I was an observer watching the script in motion, then I gradually would perform as much of the script as I felt comfortable with. While it may come easier to some, memorizing a script and actually performing one are two different beasts. Next came "cross-pitching", in which I would travel to appointments all day with Travis. I would complete one appointment, and Travis the next. If I made a sale, it went to Travis, and vice versa. I'm not sure if this is a common practice with other sales jobs, but I found it weird. Eventually I would be released on my own.

    As stated by others, two days a week you are required to be at the office for training (both business applications and motivational) and booking sessions. The pretext for setting appointments was that these Veterans were receiving no cost benefits through their service organization (VFW, AMVETS, American Legion). This free benefit is real and is an AD&D policy that is provided to the Veteran through membership to their respective organization. In order to receive it, a yellow card is filled out with name, beneficiary name, address, and phone number. These cards are turned in to the service organization and then forwarded to us, thus creating our "leads". Booking would usually begin in the early to mid afternoon and run until 9pm. According to our MGA, Chris, the goal was to book 5 appointments minimum for every day you were working in the field. You would call through your stack of "leads", sometimes multiple times because people wouldn't answer their phones, until you made your booking quota or until the night was over. If you managed to make your quota, you would then call for other agents to help them fill up their schedule. There were a couple of issues I had with this:
    1.) The average age of the Veterans was 60+. After a certain time in the evening, I found it rude to call them. This did not matter to Chris.
    2.) We were expected to help each other out. However, other agents (not SGA's or MGA's), who were senior to us were allowed to leave immediately if their schedules were filled, a double standard to the "work as a team" practice that was preached.
    3.) We were expected to be at office meetings, otherwise there was verbal criticism for not showing up. Yet there were other agents who never showed up. I knew their names, but never met them the whole time I worked there. Again, I felt it was a double standard because we were newer.
    4.) Setting appointments was solely based on the premise of delivering these no cost benefits. Nothing was ever mentioned by phone that insurance was to be talked about. In fact the phone script all but promised that the whole appointment would take 15-20 minutes (which is not true). That started to bother me as I felt I was lying to people. Why couldn't we be honest with them? This is where I would like for you AIL "True Believers" on here to justify this practice. And don't give me the "if you give them a way out, they will" crap. People either want the product or not, it's that simple. Sure, you can force them and take advantage of their weakness to say "no", but that's not writing good business, another cornerstone that is preached constantly.
    5.) There's no real tracking involved with the "leads" unless they are sold, or flat out tell you to shove it. Case in point, I had many calls where I was told that another AIL agent had already spoken to them within a day of me calling. Another, less common problem, was contacting a "lead" only to find out the card they filled out had been sent in a year, or two, or three ago, and no one had bothered to contact them in a timely manner.
    Consistently I was home by 11:30 or midnight on these days, a sore spot between me and my wife.

    In the field is just as it sounds, you go to appointments and make the sale. You're assigned a territory to work and that's where you schedule your appointments. At one point my territory was an hour one way drive from my house. Chris liked having two hour blocks for appointments, an hour and a half to seal the deal with 30 minutes travel time to the next destination. So 2 hours of commute with 5 appointments = 12 hour days. Remember kids, it's all about numbers. The idea was 5 appointments a day, with 2 sales a day. I didn't mind the driving, or the long days. Here's what I did mind:
    1.) Sometimes your appointment cancelled or was a no show, so your appointments weren't guaranteed. This gave way to a practice known as a "drop by". So you have a cancellation. You can either call through your "leads" and try to fill the gap, or you can try to do a drop by on a potential client who has avoided answering the phone. Here's a little fun fact about that: regular people don't appreciate you dropping by unannounced; Veterans like this even less. Several times I was confronted on people's front lawns and given a good cursing out. This actually leads to a loss of a potential client. Chris did not care about this. In his mind it was a chance to "turn something out of nothing".
    2.) If a sale was successful, then the whole appointment was roughly 2 hours, with completion of the paperwork via lap top, physical paperwork to be filled out, and other little things. This meant your 2 hour scheduling window went to hell real quick. Now you're late to the next appointment and have to call and apologize or reschedule, something I found quite tacky. Chris would ask if I could reschedule the appointment for the same day, sometimes as late as 10 or 11pm. Who does that? Would you open your door up that late a t night?
    3.) Most Veterans I saw were Vietnam or older. Of course this was the target group as the older you are, the more you pay. Unlike the union member side of AIL, we specifically sold burial insurance. The idea of the product is great, but the age is what drives the cost. These are small face value policies, averaging 4K to 10K. Most couples were paying $150 a month or more. We had a computer program that would let us run the numbers and be able to show the client potentially what their cost would be. Now we were instructed to use a set of numbers that were "middle of the road", so that if the sticker price was too much, then we could adjust the numbers and "down close" them. Another tactic incorporated to make sales. I agree it's nice to give the client options, but down closing was frowned upon and portrayed as I had failed to explain the product or importance of it (mostly it frustrated them that I sold a lower dollar amount policy).

    If you had a bad week, then a road trip was organized to help you make it up. Road trips were seen as better opportunities because you and several other agents would travel to an area that hadn't been visited in months. You would work the crud out of the area for a week or more and sale lots of policies. I made several road trips and barely sold enough polices to cover my gas expenses (remember it's 100% commission and all travel expenses are on you). In fact I had to sleep on the floor of my manager's hotel room because I couldn't afford a hotel for a week.

    In other occasions I was criticized for the car I drove, the lap top I owned, and my military service. I was still serving in the Reserves at the time and thus it took away time that I could have been making AIL money. When discussed with Chris that my intentions were to retire with a pension from the service, it was questioned as to it's worth. Previously I had served on active duty and then transferred to the reserves. Chris used the analogy of "I was a pro baseball player and now I just play baseball with some guys on occasion" to describe the difference between active duty and reserves, of which I found insulting. Funny, he runs a division that targets sales of insurance to help Veterans.

    In the end, I worked hard for little return. I barely kept my marriage, my house, and my military career. Within two months of me leaving I received notifications that every one of my polices dropped (probably transferred to Travis, at least that's my hope). And I'm sure my departure was chalked up to "he had issues" as I had heard Chris say of other agents who quit. It's true I had issues: with the lack of ethics, feigned concern for my well being, and my failing home life. On one occasion I remember talking to Chris about an issue between my wife and I (a dumb mistake on my part). Chris's answer "to surround yourself with people who share your same desire to succeed". You mean divorce my wife because my value of her is worth way more than this job.

    I was told "opportunity unlimited", and that I could make $1000 a day. I made about $8, 500 while I was employed there for roughly 5 months.

    2 Votes
  • Ex
    ExAgentSmith Feb 08, 2017

    @ExAgentSmith Just like any other job, it takes all types. If you are a smooth operator, who doesn't care how you come by wealth, then this is the company for you.
    However, if you prefer a more ethical approach to business, then you might try another insurance agency or different career altogether.

    2 Votes
  • Im
    I'mnotgettingscammed Feb 01, 2017

    Here is my experience and how I resolved the issue so others can use my tactics to their advantage. I had a knock at the door and a woman told me I had been sponsored for a free child safety kit by one of my friends. I allowed her and another agent I hadn't seen at first into my home. The kit was a small pamphlet that basically contained places to put information that you would be able to verbalize easily in the case of a event. You also receive a Ziplock baggie with a ink strip for finger printing your child. That takes about five minutes. After they gave me my kit they proceeded a bit about how I also was sponsored for a small accidental death policy. In order to obtain that you have to watch 3 drawn out insurance videos. I have to admit their scripts are well written and they have answers for everything. By the end of their speech you are worried about your death, coverage, college, home and funeral costs. They have you thinking that your already great insurance won't touch the burden you are leaving for your family. You agree to look at the policies and they tell you that you will only need to pay $25 a month for coverage. After all the paperwork is filled out it's $101 a month. They told me they needed my husband to sign as well. Mind you they arrived at my house at 4 and my husband was not going to be home until after 7. I told them I didn't have the money for the policy that day and they could come back a different day when my husband would be home. They said they could set up my son's and my account and do my husbands later. I still said I didn't have the money so we could just do it another time. They said that they way they were setting it up in the computer it wouldn't come out until the next Friday. While they were "setting up" those policies their computer kept "acting up" It kept acting up until my husband got home from work. 3 1/2 hours they were in my home. We signed the policies just so they would leave. I called back two days after they had been at our house to cancel. I was told the agent needed to come back to cancel. A few days after that one of the agents came to my home and talked me into keeping the policies and lowering the premiums. I knew I wasn't going to keep it but I wanted the agent to leave. I called the corporate office number the next day on a Wednesday. I canceled my policies. That Sunday I had 3 calls from the agent saying I needed to set up our appointments for blood work for the policies I had canceled. I called corporate Monday and waited on hold for 15 minutes. I explained I had canceled and about the phone calls. I also asked about a refund because they had taken my money our even though I had canceled. They talked to me maybe 5 minutes, They said it had been canceled and one of the policies had been refunded. I assured them no money had been returned. They then told me it had been sent in a check. I asked why and they said because it was my 13 year old sons policy so his name isn't on my bank account so it had to be mailed. I asked for the check number and wrote it down. They assured me the rest of the money would be returned in 15 days. I thought about the call all day and just felt something was off. I called back at 4 the same day. This time I told them I wanted e-mails of cancellation conformation. They told me I should have received those last Wednesday but they would enter my request in the computer and if I hadn't received one in 3 days to call. Why would it take 3 days?! I thought about this all night. I went online and read all the stories of people in the same situation as I am. I read how they canceled months before, never received conformation and still had money withdrawn from their accounts for months! No way was I going to deal with that. I called on my break the next day. This time before they could speak I informed them I was recording our phone conversation with a google voice app and any information from this call would be used for resolution with a lawyer. I informed them that the lawyer I talked to was very interested in their company and the multiple people with the same problems I was having. I then proceeded to tell them I needed the cancellation conformation and money returned to my account that day or I would proceed in that way. Needless to say I had the cancellation conformation letters in my inbox within minutes of ending our phone call. My money was returned to my account by opening business hours of my bank today. Good luck to all of you having these issues! I hope my experience and strategic persistence will be of service. I also want to mention if you write your experience on their Facebook page they ask you to pm them your name and phone number. I received a pm from them within hours stating they expedited my complaint. They said my money would be returned within 24/48 hours. I don't know if it was my phone call or blasting them on social media but something worked! Good luck!

    0 Votes
  • Jo
    Jody D Jan 25, 2017
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    The internet is AIL's worst enemy. Most of their Facebook reviews are only 1 star and the fake reviews from the AIL shills can't keep up with the bad ones. The one scary fact I notice is that there are no positive stories from policy holders. Everything about the company is about making a quick buck and no mention of the quality and pride behind the product they're selling. This company only cares about recruiting and adding to their numbers. Good luck receiving any sort of service from AIL once they have your signature and money.

    1 Votes
  • zineiac Jan 12, 2017
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    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Well then what is a good legitimate company to work for?

    0 Votes
  • De
    DelbertDickfer69 Jan 09, 2017
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    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Been "working" there for a few weeks now, no paycheck, no help, nothing but finding out these guys are a bunch of smooth talking, swindling, devil tongued b######s who make their money off you, and people you "sponsor" (pyramid scheme). I was really hoping to TRULY help people improve their lives with something they need, which I was told would be "warm leads", but these warm leads come from referrals of friends you have also swindled into a visit. My REAL problem was with their "child sare kits", who people unknowingly fill out online claiming it would lower the Amber Alert time of their child to 15 mins if they ever get abducted. They have NO want, need, or use for life insurance. These, my friends, are your "warm leads". As a parent myself, I took this personally.

    1 Votes
  • De
    Deaf ears 17 Jan 05, 2017

    I love how all the people on here that complain like to make themselves out to be victims. If you're not willing to do what it takes to be an entrepreneur then instead of blaming everyone but yourself and waisting more time by going on the internet and posting how everyone but you in the whole wide world is dishonest and money hungry and self interested ect... you sound like a baby! You have obviously given up on life and are probably working at a job you can't stand making a little over the minimum wage. You sound sad. And your story is sad. Make a decision to change your life and live your dream. You can do it. Maybe not with insurance but maybe real estate, mortgage loans, financial services, ect. No one is going to give you money and yet there is an abundance of it. Quit being a blamer and start taking action. You sound like a whiner.

    -3 Votes
  • Bp
    Bpips Dec 28, 2016

    My experience has been somewhat different and similar. I went to the location in Arlington, TX. I have been contacted by AIL before since my resume is public and also contacted them because I see an ad for a customer service job. The name is never mentioned, so that's how I end up applying more than once & don't realize it. When I first had an interview, I thought it went very well, but I didn't get called back. The 2nd time, I recognized the address and didn't go. Today, I went for an interview & was very disappointed when I realized where I was. They had changed the wording of the ad & called it a "benefits enroller" instead of customer service. Nothing too suspicious stood out though once I got there. The office is in a big building, but it looks like any other decent office. The manager explained the pay and stated it was straight commission. If hired, we will have to pay for our license out of pocket ($200), but many jobs have that. Nothing was mentioned about an application fee or any other fee aside from the license. Fingerprints were mentioned, but I know some companies will pay for you and sometimes you have to pay out of pocket. This isn't an issue to me. This time, I did get a call back for the final interview. I'm going, but I'm not sure if I'll take the job yet. I wrote down some questions that I consider being deciding factors, mostly dealing with pay and how it works. I have worked straight commission jobs before, but need to make sure that the rate is worth it if I'm putting forth my best work effort.

    0 Votes
  • Ri
    Rick Hamell Aug 15, 2016
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I too have been contacted by these guys. Their hiring practices are straight out of the multi-level-marketing handbook. They'll say anything to get you into the door, including lying about where they got your resume and what job you're actually being hired for. I am far from the only person who has had issues with them, as can be seen above.

    1 Votes
  • Mo
    Money797 Aug 04, 2016

    If it didn't work for you why are yall so mad? Ive made good money so far!! And I'm happiest I've been in a while to go to work. About to go sell a policy right now, hopefully(fingers crossed) it's defnitely not for people that have time to waste bashing things that they're not successful in. Gotta go make some money, peace

    -4 Votes
  • Ki
    kimperiale Aug 04, 2016

    I only registered for this site to thank the people who posted about this company for saving me from a wasted morning! You guys rock.

    0 Votes
  • Wa
    Wander von der Seele Jul 13, 2016
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    A GM cheated another GM to recruit me, told me to replace my full-time collection agency job with AIL while I was going to tradeschool. I accepted because I was so desperate to get out of my collection job. Once I quit my full-time job and had no income, suddenly my school hours (9am-1pm three days a week) was "too much time to be successful with AIL" and the manager was pushing me to quit college to work 12 hours a day 7 days a week with AIL.

    I told them I've reconsidered and am choosing college over AIL, and they literally abandoned me on the side of the road in the middle of bear country in Palmer in Alaska. Now I have no job, school bills to pay, am homeless, starving, and at my school typing this (where I sit all day because I have nowhere else to go). My GM at AIL literally taunted me in texts about how I "set myself up for failure" and took the only $900 policy I wrote at AIL. I was working 2 jobs and going to school, and because I didn't trust my gut about these people, I'm destitute, hungry, and not sure how I am going to survive.

    Don't work for these people. They had a celebration over hiring 815-ish people in 1 month...does that really sound like a company that has your best interests in mind?

    2 Votes
  • Jl
    JLister Jun 18, 2016
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    A family-member works for a company affiliated with a union. We started getting calls--about two every other day--from an unknown number. Online research revealed it to be American Income Life. We ignored the calls. After two weeks of this, the caller finally identified herself, requesting a call back to "...get a signature for an insurance certificate..." Two days after that, at 5:30 pm, SATURDAY EVENING, the caller shows up at our door! We were not impressed with the manipulations used for the obvious "cold" call; I made same known, almost to the point of rudeness. We endured 45 minutes of scripted, sales-pitch--not sinful in and of itself, but unexpected at such an hour, and unwelcome when hidden under the guise of simply needing a signature--and told the AIL rep we were not interested in anything insurance at the time. Declination was repeated 5 times, each interim highlighted by the AIL rep trying to tailor the dollar-amount to our budget. Reading various complaints on this, and other, sites, we have determined there are too many red flags to do business with this AIL.

    While normal sales techniques are diverse and utilize a certain amount of pressure, I have NEVER appreciated a person coming into my home on false pretenses, or using a young employee's naiveté to make a sale. I told this to the AIR rep, who handled my displeasure professionally...but refused to leave, reschedule, or minimize the visit. I would advise AIL to discourage cold calls, stop using online "information" to nurture business, and treat every customer (and their home) as sacrosanct; anything less is not diligence, it is rude and intrusuve. I cannot say AIL is a scam. I am, however, highly suspicious of any, first-time visitor asking intimate details about my family (e.g. asking about high school, when the person is a college graduate? Very creepy!). Coupled with numerous complaints on various sites, we will not be doing business with AIL, despite its "affiliation" with unions. Do your research. Good luck to you all.

    1 Votes
  • An
    anthonyiscool May 19, 2016

    Okay, that is so not true, my father has worked there since he was 18. He was very successful and i learned a lot from watching him and I clearly know more than you. everything you just said is untrue. get evidence before you make a claim like this.

    -2 Votes
  • Ta
    Tammy L McKee May 17, 2016
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    OMG.. Yea this place is crazy... I didn't understand WHY they wanted me to give them 94.00 up front for what? I mean yea they lay out a pretty picture, but the one who interviewed me was kind of hesitant to ask for the 94.00 up front. BUt I went to the job interview and then same day the 2nd interview. But it was strange, because they wanted me in the classroom for 3 days with NO PAY? Come on. You should at least get money for training. Then I had to fork out over 150.00 for tests and my license and coming from a fixed income family, I could not do it. I never called her back to give the money. I think all they want is the money up front. So yea, I hope no one else has to do this. If you apply for a "customer service" job, and you receive a call from them.. HANG UP!!!

    2 Votes
  • Ai
    AILtrainee May 10, 2016

    Hi everyone, I've read through a great many of the comments here with regards to the original complaint posted against AIL and I must say that all the negatives that have been presented are 100% accurate based on my own (very brief) experience with the company. I won't go quite so far as to label the company an outright "scam", but nonetheless I wouldn't recommend this company to anyone - certainly not anyone with principles, morals, or any form of a conscience. Unless literally all you care about is yourself and money, and unless you never want to devote any of your waking moments to anything but thinking about and selling life insurance, this company is something to avoid.

    A bit of background on me. I've been struggling for a couple of years to find a career path to set out on that I can be satisfied with, and after leaving my last job after 6 months, I spent the subsequent 2 months looking for a new opportunity. I finally contacted a friend of mine who I'd known for a long time and who I knew made excellent money selling life insurance. I just wanted to know how he had gotten into sales, since that wasn't his background, and it was one path I was considering pursuing. I just wanted to know if he'd taken some classes or read a good book on the subject or had any particular skills that made him well-suited to being in sales. Instead of offering me a few pointers, he immediately offered me an interview with his company, American Income Life. Having completely struck out in the job application department over the preceding 2 months, I seized on the chance to have an interview, and went against my gut which told me that selling insurance was a sketchy business at best.

    As other commenters have noted, the interview process is a three-part affair. The initial interview lasts all of 2 minutes, after which you fill out a lengthy questionnaire about basic personality traits, as well as what motivates you, what you want from/expect to gain from the job, what about the job most appeals to you, what concerns you have about the position, etc. Along with all the other recruits (in my case, this was about 30 people), you sit through an hour-long orientation session where the two top managers (RGA and SGA) discuss the company and its compensation system in the most attractive light imaginable. It's very hard not to be taken in and impressed by what they tell you during this presentation, especially the money component where they assure you of how easily you can expect to make $1500 each week. Finally, if you're called back, you have a final interview the next day, which lasts about an hour and in which a manager discusses things in a bit more detail with you, including the rough schedule for the two-week training that all new hires must go through. I made it through the two weeks, but that was all I could stomach.

    The training requires you to be in the office at 9AM (or 8AM, depending on your manager) Monday thru Friday and work (in the office, in the field, or a combination depending on the day) until at least 9PM each day. Most people in my training class worked well past 9 and even 10PM many days (sometimes 11PM), not getting home until midnight in some cases. Saturdays are also work days - appointments start at 8AM and can last until 5PM. Sundays are only off-days if your manager allows you to take them off, but if they have appointments scheduled and want you to be at them to present or observe, then you get the privilege of working on Sunday, too. You are effectively forbidden from thinking about anything other than American Income Life for this entire period, which consists of classroom time, time setting appointments on the phones, and time in the field observing (and ultimately assisting to varying degrees) your manager while he/she gives presentations to clients. During this time, you are only paid for policies that your manager writes in your name, and they have absolutely no obligation to do this. I think they are encouraged to and may even be technically supposed to, but ultimately your manager is going to be much more concerned about lining their own pockets than with whether you receive any sort of meager compensation for all your time and effort.

    The amount of material that is dumped on you during these two weeks is unlike anything I've ever come across, and everything is presented one time and you're expected to just know it after that. The worst part, though, is that nothing is presented coherently because every manager has a different take on how to say and do things in the field. You are expected to learn a lengthy script, which in itself is not a difficult prospect, but it is made a nightmare by the fact that each manager structures it differently and adds or omits any number of components based on personal preference. However, to be released on your own after the two-week training period, you need to know the standard script verbatim - again, this is not hard in itself, but it's quite difficult to keep the standard script straight in your head when you've just spent two weeks hearing someone do it completely differently.

    For the record, I had the script and all the other requisite material fully memorized, so don't think that I bailed on this because I just couldn't cut it and learn what they wanted me to. That was not the problem, and frankly, from an intellectual standpoint, I think anyone could do this job. What made me jump ship was the ethical component (or lack thereof). For example, you may wonder what on Earth you could possibly be doing that requires you to work until 9/10/11 o'clock at night. There are a few things. The first possibility is that you're calling people relentlessly on the phone, which is required on Mondays and Thursdays from 4-9PM until you have 8 appointments scheduled for the each of the next two days (Tues/Wed and Fri/Sat, respectively). The second possibility is that you're out knocking on people's doors trying to get ahold of them in person to either walk in and give a presentation on the spot, or schedule an appointment for a subsequent day. (You're allowed to do this until 9PM on any given day, and my manager and I did this, knocking on someone's door in the dark and pouring rain at 9PM one evening.) So, in my opinion, the first two reasons you work until past 9 every night essentially amount to harassing people. I mean, leave people alone at some point. I wouldn't be happy to have random people calling me up or, even weirder, knocking on my door at all hours of the night, so consequently I didn't feel comfortable doing it to other people. That was my first ethical concern.

    The final reason you work past 9PM every day, though, could be that for some reason someone has actually agreed to schedule an appointment with you at 8 or even 9PM at night. This brings me to my second ethical concern. When scheduling appointments with people either in person or over the phone, oftentimes they push back on you and offer certain objections. Each objection has a scripted rebuttal designed to assuage people's concerns enough for them to allow you to meet with them. One of the most frequent questions/objections is: "How long is this going to take?" The scripted response is: "It only takes about 20-30 minutes, depending on how many questions you have for me." This is a BLATANT LIE. To go through an entire presentation, even with ZERO questions from a client, takes a MINIMUM of 90 minutes, and ofter over 2 hours. This is bad enough for morning or afternoon appointments, but if you have an 8 or 9PM appointment with someone and it takes you 2 hours, that is seriously invasive. Who wants strangers in their home trying to sell them things under shaky pretexts well past 10 or 11 at night?!

    Speaking of shaky pretexts, most people can smell a salesman from a mile away and are often skeptical when you call them or, better yet, show up on their doorstep out of the blue offering so-called "no-cost" benefits. It is true that the union workers you meet with have certain no-cost benefits setup for them by their union, and it's part of your job (though not a paid part) to go over those with them, but at no point do you ever make it clear to them that after you explain those no-cost benefits you are going to try as hard as you can to sell them insurance for $100+ a month. So say someone objects by saying, "If this is about life insurance, I'm not interested". In this case, while knowing full well your singular goal is to sell this person life insurance, your scripted response is supposed to be: "My job is just to go over the 4 no-cost benefits that have been setup for you by your union. While I'm there, we can go over some additional benefits that you may be eligible for as well." Those "additional benefits" are the benefit of a random salesperson trying to cram life insurance down your throat. So this constituted another point of moral/ethical concern because, once again, you're required to misrepresent (if not outright ignore) the truth as part of your basic job description.

    An additional point of contention was selling policies to people for whom English was not their first language. In addition to being a nightmare over the phone (it's awfully hard to convey your points and schedule an appointment when neither you nor the person you're speaking to can understand what the other is saying), it's just flat-out taking advantage of people as far as I'm concerned. My manager had no qualms about selling a policy to a woman who barely spoke English. His rationalization was that we had really done her a good service because if we hadn't shown up to provide her with life insurance, how was she ever going to get it otherwise? Whatever helps you sleep at night...

    So the moral dilemmas are rampant, and it was clear even in the brief two weeks I was with AIL that the only way to be successful was to have no ethics and be highly manipulative. Furthermore, when you're interviewing and going through training, the managers pitch the business as being what you make of it - in other words, the harder you work, the more you get paid. This is not necessarily true. First of all, your commissions are based not on the number of policies you sell, but on the total value of the annual premiums of the policies you sell. So, if you sell three policies that each have a monthly premium of $40 (=annual premium of $480, times three = $1, 440), you get paid less than someone who only sold one policy with a monthly premium of $150 (=annual premium of $1, 800). Secondly, you can work as hard as you possibly can to schedule appointments, but that doesn't mean that any of the people you scheduled will actually be home when you get there, or that the ones that do will buy from you. The managers insist that it's all just a numbers game and if you schedule enough appointments, you'll eventually get in front of enough people and make sales. This may be true to some degree, but there's definitely not a directly proportional relationship between effort and earnings, as they would have you believe.

    Furthermore, remember what I said about the goal being to have 8 appointments per day scheduled for Tues/Wed and Fri/Sat? And remember that it takes minimum 90 minutes to give a presentation? Well, if you schedule (as they insist you do) a "full day's work" of 8 appointments in 1-hour time slots between 1 and 8PM (or 8AM to 3PM on Saturdays), when every appointment takes 90 minutes and you have to drive 30+ minutes at times between appointments, you're scheduling appointments that you know full well you can't possibly make it to. You can realistically do a maximum of 4 presentations in a given day, yet the managers insist you schedule twice that number as a way of hedging against no-shows, cancellations and re-schedules. I guess I can reluctantly concede to the strict logic of this, but ethically it's just not okay to make people commit to setting aside an hour of their valuable time for you when you know there's only a 50-50 chance at best that you'll actually be able to see them. (Even worse, a manager had a 12:30 appointment one day and just decided to cancel it because he didn't feel like going. So courteous...)

    One final point on scheduling. They say that there is no cold-calling because they give you leads to work from, so you're not just a straight-up telemarketer. This aspect appealed to me initially and is part of what compelled me to give this a shot, but it's only partly true (like everything else they tell you). Now it is true that you receive leads in the form of union workers who have filled out some form which results in their information being sent to AIL. However, the managers are adamant that getting REFERRALS is the most important part of the job. Indeed, to emphasize this point, they literally say, "If you don't get referrals, you die." Well, what is a referral, actually? Is it not just the name and phone number of a random person who has little to no basis for needing the services you intend to surreptitiously provide? You can ask a given client to give the people he refers a heads-up that you'll be calling, but even when they do this (which is quite rare), those referrals still have little to no idea who you are or what you're all about. So, how is that not cold-calling and, thus, straight-up telemarketing?

    I'm sure I could go on, but hopefully I've laid out enough here to give you a decent picture of what to expect from AIL. I should have gone with my instinct on this job, which told me that insurance companies are shady at best and that I should run the other way. I knew full well that if something sounds too good to be true, as this opportunity did, then it can't possibly be what it seems. But despite all that, I went against my gut because I figured if my friend had done it successfully and vouched for the company, then maybe this company was different. Believe me, it is not. Now I even have to re-evaluate my friend on some level, which is perhaps the most disappointing part of this whole experience. Because, again, to be successful in this business, as he has been, you can't let ethics, morals, principles, or common decency influence any part of what you do. I thought I knew him better, but maybe not.

    In closing, I'll point out what my friend's boss - an MGA - said to me when I met with him to tell him I wasn't going to continue with AIL. I laid out all of my concerns to him, saying: "I don't like the idea of selling insurance policies to people who barely speak English. I'm not comfortable harassing people on the phone and knocking on their doors until 9 o'clock at night. And I don't like telling people that an appointment will only take 20-30 minutes depending on how many questions they have for me when I know full well that, even if they have no questions, the presentation will take a minimum of 90 minutes." After I listed that last concern, the MGA got a sad look on his face, and he responded by saying: "It sounds like you think we're lying to people." That one sentence told me all I needed to know.

    3 Votes
  • De
    Deaf ears 17 Jan 05, 2017

    @AILtrainee In your whole rant you blamed everyone but yourself. If you're not comfortable with talking to people about benefits and helping them out then yes, you need to move on. It's no ones fault but your own. How old are you? Lol. Thanks for the long detailed story of you giving up and how it was the company's fault or The Mga's fault. 90 minutes!?!? Oh my!?!? You're story was less than that and worth nothing. Yes, you are a victim and much worse off having had this experience. Thanks for sharing and waisting my time.

    -5 Votes
  • Ma
    MarkEscalera May 02, 2016
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I agree 100% I interviewed with them a year ago and not being young you learn to ask more than just a few questions and base your opinion of character based on their answers and body language. I just got a call from a company that saw me on indeed and they started talking about the company and never said the name. I asked who they were and I got the same side step and just an explanation of what they do not who they are. While on the phone I looked up the business by address and took the opportunity to let them have it

    0 Votes
  • Om
    Om Moon Mar 16, 2016
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I am an M.GA with over 30 years experience, with different insurance companies and offer up to 115% commission and some companies advance commission. Please call Montani Insurance Service at: [protected] or e-mail me at: [email protected]

    -2 Votes
  • He
    HellNaw Feb 12, 2016

    I had a feeling something was fishy from the first moment. I was called by one of their reps and we did a short phone interview. The rep was too quick to accept my answers to her questions. I could have answered anything and she would still have said "you look like you have the talent we're looking for." My interview is in an hour and a half. I'm glad I read up on them.

    1 Votes
  • Ar
    Art Perry Dec 14, 2015
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I received a phone call this morning for a job interview. She said that it would be hourly as I will not work for straight commission. So I am thinking about not going after I read this review on this site.

    1 Votes
  • Ca
    Catalina Combs Dec 03, 2015
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Thank you for posting this. I received an email today posted below for a position. I save all my resume applications and this one did not show up in my records. so I immediately looked up the company and the phone number provided at the end of the email. it turns out this truly is a scam. people have gotten the exact same emails and turns out this is not a real job opportunity although they are a real company. so watch out.

    Email received:
    Good afternoon,
    I received your interest regarding our union benefit coordinator
    Position we currently have available with the dimitrova group. after review of your
    Qualifications we would like to invite you in for an interview with
    Mr. dimitrova on tuesday december 8th @ 9:45. please feel free to
    Contact me either by telephone or email to confirm this time will
    Work for your schedule.
    Our new office is located at 1900 west garvey avenue south, suite 340
    west covina, ca 91790
    It will be a pleasure to meet you. it’s very important that you dress
    Professional, bring a hard copy of your resume, and plan on being
    With us for about 45 minutes to complete the interview process.

    Kind regards,
    Lisa jackson
    Hr assistant
    The dimitrova group
    1900 west garvey avenue south
    Suite 340
    West covina, ca 91790
    Direct line:[protected]

    -1 Votes
  • Br
    Brian Cabral Nov 28, 2015
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Can never judge companies by online forums..

    -4 Votes
  • Br
    Brian Cabral Nov 28, 2015
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Lol, AIL is one of the best companies out there to work for. Disgruntled employees, always complaining about sumthin.

    -4 Votes
  • Ja
    Jacqueline L. Ames Nov 11, 2015

    Thank you everyone for your comments regarding AIL. I was recently contacted and "hired", however my gut said be careful. My resume was also posted on several public employment websites in hopes of being hired with a honest, reputable company. Hard working, educated and looking for a career change, I found AIC and decided to take a chance and attend the interview. When I arrived I found the staff to be pleasant and entered a room full of 12 other candidates. We spent the next two hours listening to information about the company, being assured there was ample room for advancement & that a large amount of money could be made if you "work hard enough". Sales is not for everyone they stated, but those who do well can make a very handsome salary. What they failed to state at this time is that the AIL newbies would be working only on commission with no opportunity for overtime, mileage reimbursements/starting costs. Travel time and long hours was mentioned briefly, but they stated that other information related to that would be discussed in the final interview process. During my final interview I asked many questions regarding management, philosophy, mission statement, job description etc...the agent was able to respond appropriately. Again, red flags arose as we discussed the $315.00 needed for the "Study materials/Licensing" - I am a professional and have never had a job where I had to pay anything out of pocket. (With the exception of background checks). Also a humanitarian and intuitive I recognized quickly that the main focus is money making rather than the welfare of the client. I admit, the bonuses and potential "weekly income potential" attracted me, very convincing- they know how to manipulate effectively to lure people in. AIL is deceitful in their approach and promise to care for their agents/new hires, however the research shows they are quite the opposite. I'm sure there are good people that work for this company that have worked hard and done well for themselves. For me, this is not the right fit. Success to me means Integrity, Professionalism and Honesty...the ability to genuinely help people live their best life (regardless of product being sold)- In my opinion, none of these seem to apply to AIC.

    3 Votes
  • Su
    Sue - Sugar Land, TX Oct 26, 2015

    I thank all of you. With my Resume being Public, I received a call today from AIL. The Recruiter was such a nice young man and convinced me that maybe a "Change" would be good for me. I had been in Customer/Sales Support and Business Reporting for over 18 years. I wasn't having luck getting hired so I agreed to the interview.

    ummm...NOT.

    Cancelling that Interview for Thursday right now!

    0 Votes
  • Pe
    pennypetals Jul 29, 2015

    I've worked at AIL for 6 months. Not long, but I'm averaging 1500 a week. This isn't as much as I would like. However the potential to make more is clear. The complaints are skewed to just wrong. Get over your own inadequacy and move on.

    -6 Votes
  • Pd
    Pdoffatail Jul 04, 2015

    These people at AIL are a complete joke!! I went to what I thought was an interview in the KY office, and got a sales pitch instead. I would never work for this company and they have an big integrity problem.
    JS

    1 Votes
  • Te
    TellitAsitIs May 01, 2015
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Yes, mr. happy n. paid typifies the kind of quality individual that works and shills for ail. certainly the ability to discharge derogatory speech and profanities, and to relentlessly depress the caps-lock key on one's keyboard isn't indicative of any significant intellectual capacity, academic credentials or moral compass. mr. happy may claim to be rich, but can his words (the words of an american income life shill) be trusted? even if those said "riches" were true, they were likely gained in a deceitful, predatory and sociopathic manner. the argument that a company has existed for a long time or is large (or fortune 700) is not proof of legitimacy and ethical business practice. many mlm and pyramid schemes use the same argument: "if what we were doing was illegal, then we would have been shut down long ago". this is in essence mr. happy n. paid's argument for ail's legitimacy - it is utter nonsense and has been debunked time and time again (just look at amway or monavie). anyone who has become "rich" working at ail has indeed worked very hard to earn a deserved front seat row in hell along with all the other gross sociopaths in our society. the ceo of ail is certainly as great and as vile of a sociopath as a human can ever hope to aspire to. it is sad and tragic that mr. happy n. paid and the ail shills of the world base their dreams and aspirations on such indecency, filth and debauchery.

    2 Votes
  • Mr
    Mr. Happy N. Paid Apr 25, 2015
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Let's face it... you suck at being an insurance agent! you can't scam in the insurance industry and be around for 64 years! stop crying and flip those fries! I may be brainwashed or whatever you losers want to call it... but i'm rich biiiiiiiiiiiaaaaatttttccccchhhhh!!!

    -4 Votes
  • Di
    Dizimz Apr 19, 2015

    It is mind boggling to see how long this has been going on for.

    Ive issued several claims on my experience with this company since resigning. even though I still work in insurance (albeit for a completely different and ethical company) I still like to take time to give my level headed experience with ail.

    At first when resigning it took a while to soak in everything, because when I first delivered my experience there were a few things I didnt notice until I soaked it all in. working for a competitor of ail also opened my eyes as well. so please forgive me if this is a long one but I do wish to shed light on this company.


    1 - ail isnt well known - even by the union members ail claims to help, the name is generally over their head. the overall experience is mostly negative for clients and employees alike, and most of it comes from the large amounts of deception.
    Ail is a subsidiary of torchmark, one of the worst insurance companies of the modern day (they are featured on many websites with huge red flags) and they're best known for bait and switching elderly people and using high pressure sales tactics to close the deal.
    Neither torchmark or ail have any regards for the well being of their employees or clients, just money.
    Specifically; torchmark used to send out cards for supposed medicare benefits for seniors, the senior would fill out that card and mail it back to the company. this becomes a hot lead. a sales agent with torchmark then books that client to talk about the medicare benefits, and once the agent meets with the prospect, they go into a life insurance pitch.
    Ail does the same thing, but instead of targeting the elderly, they target union members and use 'free union benefits' as the bait.
    anyone with a conscience will not feel comfortable doing this period. however being determined to make the best of the situation, I used their 'script' and smooth talked my way into homes for a while, until I could no longer sleep at night that is.

    2 - their model does not work - it may seem like im making excuses for my failure, but heres the thing. out of all the newbies, I was earning the most, by a long shot...
    we need to examine the 'system' thoroughly to determine if it is designed to 'work'
    - limits on prospecting - you are assigned 25 leads per week, and you are restricted to those leads, you can also request old/abandoned leads to increase your odds of selling. even the best salesman in the world is not guaranteed to sell when restricted...
    - if you dont sell, no more leads - so when you are stuck with those 25 people, you may not be able to sell any of them... when that eventually happens, you get no more new leads. so each week, you make less and less money until you are effectively squeezed out.
    - money is a requirement to stay afloat - ok, so if you need to treat this as your own business, you need money to support your expenses - gas, travel, lodging, eating take out etc. ail offers nothing to get you started, lets take a look at 2 other insurance companies I know well - combined insurance - starts you off with 2400$ paid over your first 10 weeks, and your first week in the field your manager is responsible for helping you earn your first 1, 000.00-2, 000.00$ on top of that. combined also has a plan to build an errors account. sunlife - starts you off with a 2, 000$ signing bonus, and a 2, 000.00$ errors account.
    - errors accounts - are necessary for insurance agents - because we are paid an advance on annual premiums, if a policy cancels before the year is up, the amount of the advance not paid needs to be refunded to the company. combined and sunlife both offer errors accounts, that prevent the refund from being clawed out of your paycheck upfront.
    In fact, neither clawback the refund off your direct paycheck, but both deduct 10-20% from your paychecks monthly until a standard balance is achieved in your errors account. anything in excess is paid back to you within 15-30 days.
    Ail has no such thing - bad sales are taking right off your paycheck, so this means, even if you have a rockin' week, you could be blind sided by huge deductions - ask yourself this, why doesnt ail offer an errors account or plan to help you stay on the books?
    - ail offers a 90 day recision period wtf? that is a huge window for a client to change their money. needless to say, you are paid the following week, and that means that if they rescind, youre done f*ed thats a 100% commission clawback.
    - it is technically advantageous for management for you to quit - your managers will take your residuals (see bottom) and that is where the big issue comes in.
    - their system is expensive - your lead cards are 25 people who share an area code. and there is no guarantee that they will be near one another, this means that one appointment could be an hour drive from another. and so on. typically, I noticed that most appointments were a minimal 30 minute drive from the previous. my vehicle which has average fuel economy burns 10$ worth of gas every 100km. I calculated that on average, I would travel 100-200km to the area I was working, and then 200-300 kms between each appointment, and then 100-200km home.in a given day, I would easily burn 40-50$ you're expected to be in the field monday, tuesday, thursday and friday. so you will likely burn at least 150-250$ of fuel in a week. that's not including take out, and lodging for when you travel to further. I began only spending 2 or 3 days in the field to conserve costs. and even then was still hemoraging hundreds of dollars in fuel.
    - you will be crushed by the snowball effect - eventually, even the most determined will get weeded out by the snowballing effect of passed due bills, and the high cost of doing business here. what money you earn will begin being clawed back, so even big sellers maybe made 500$ a week after clawbacks and if the cheque didnt bounce for their new sales, so if even if they made enough to get by next week, the dwindling leads made it more and more difficult, and beyond that, you are restricted to those leads. if they;re duds, you're fudged.

    3 - long hours? - depending on who you ask, the demand is ridiculous with ail. well im not inclined to agree, because I personally only worked at most 50 hours. however I did witness some people working 80+ hours.
    It's hard to say if I was better at selling than they were, but I was better on the phone. I used to work escalations for a large company for 3 years, and so I was natural with dealing with all sorts of people and smooth talking them. (dont worry I use my powers for good these days) with that said, I spent maybe 5 hours on the phone a week. but ive seen people spend from 3:00pm - almost 11:00pm harassing people.

    4 - no one is safe - the astounding thing about the company is the fact that maybe 2 people were making real money. the owner of the agency, and his little pion. both making 350, 000+
    However, it took them years to get there and neither are the most honest people.
    Managers seem to be required to spend inordinate amounts of money on fancy clothes to seduce new hirees. I say this because both managers who were involved with training me wore brand name suits, polos, ties etc. both easily invested 1, 500-5, 000$ on their wardrobe. and yet one didnt have a car... and the other couldnt afford to keep his car insurance, both were roomates in a middle end apartment (about 850 a month in rent) but both were "successful"
    Dont let the flashy suits seduce you, because for most of them it is a ruse.in fact I can say with confidence that those making money were doing so dishonestly - not just from lying to clients and employees, but much more. the most successful
    Use their underlings to avoid clawbacks (by distributing their sales under their underling's name as opposed to theirs)
    Make no mistake, clawbacks hurt the most.


    5 - tax fraud, money laundering, and more -
    Ok I cannot personally say that ive witnessed all oft this, but there are people who would testify if need be.
    tax fraud - ok ail is a quasi mlm situation, you go - pp < sa < ga < mga < sga
    whatever your position is, the person above you will want to put their sales in your name. no, this is not charity. my manager put nearly 7, 000$ of commissions through my name without my consent. when the check is paid, he would then escort me to a bank and have me cash the check and then give him his commission in cash. this clearly allows him to fly under revenue canada's radar, and puts me into a higher tax bracket.
    money laundering (this ive only heard about)- because ail gives that massive 90 day recision period, there is evidence of agents setting up massive policies for people partaking in illegal activies (drug dealing, prostitution rings, etc) theyd sell huge whole life policies. and the criminal involved would cancel at around 90 days, or make a claim or split the commission. the purpose is to take their illegally earned cash, and make it legal. see by having ail issue a refund, the crook then has a receipt to confirm where the money came from if he or she were ever investigated.
    rebating - bribing prospects into buying policies - nuff said

    6 - non professional -
    Being in the industry for a good while now, I determine that ail is not necessarily anomalous, but that it is substandard non the less.
    They hire everyone with a pulse, heck there may even be a few zombies in the office.
    I try not to be judgemental, but many of the people ive seen in the office... well... not spring chickens to say the least.
    Ranging from people who I frankly wouldnt want in my house, to people with poor hygiene, and people with criminal records (my manager being one of those criminal record folks) now I believe everyone deserves a shot at redemption, but the criminal record thing bugs me somewhat, because perhaps insurance isnt the appropriate industry for criminals who havent been yet pardoned...?
    The most professional thing about the office was the facade put on by the staff - wearing flashy suits, ralph lauren, lacoste, calvin klein, clothes (when they could barely afford their car insurance) but that was about it.


    - recently, I was granted the pleasure of having a manager deliver me a pizza. looks like all the fraud caught up to him. or maybe he was tired of not making money, and heck at least he doesnt have to buy 800$ suits to deliver pizza.

    Overall, in the insurance industry, it is most reasonable to say this - most people make 36, 000$ their first year and progressively make more each year as they improve their sales and build residuals. 100, 000$ incomes are unheard of, but are exceptional cases, not the norm. the only people making 6 figures at ail are the ones whove been their 15-20 years and built their residuals as well as their staff's. they also earn a percentage of their staff's earnings, and take the residuals from those who quit 100%. so those guys making 325, 000$ are earning their residuals as well as the residuals from the hundreds who have quit under their care over the years.

    2 Votes
  • Te
    TellitAsitIs Feb 24, 2015
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Yes, let's talk facts. fact: ail (torchmark, altig, american income life) spams every job site conceivable with multiple postings daily all across north america (has for a decade and continues to do so as I type this comment). those job postings rarely name american income life as the company hiring (because of their horrible online reputation) nor state the true nature of the "opportunity" (i. e. insurance licence course fees, factual salary/earning expectations, independent contractor status implications, lead quality, etc.). fact: calling these postings jobs or a job offer is a stretch at best. fact: almost all online review sites that feature negative comments about ail employment experiences will include numerous misleading, untruthful scam posts by shill accounts created by ail employees. with a little observation, it is obvious to anyone that these accounts typically only ever make one post, and will almost never reply to rebuttals. the passwords and user names for these accounts are not kept or remembered by ail employees because they are too numerous to keep track of and rampantly high ail employee turnover does not easily allow for such continuity. fact: ail shills almost always speak in derogatory terms or language to those who have legitimate complaints or concerns about the company in an effort to discredit them. fact: when a company churns through employees on a massive scale, requires a quallifying expenditure of money up-front under the guise of a "job offer" and then subsequently blames the victim if they were unable to "succeed" - it is an indication that the company is a horrible place to work, has a terrible hr policy/department, is a pyramid scheme/mlm, or is a full blown job scam. take your pick as to which you think ail / american income life is. perhaps some day in a kinder, gentler future this racket will put out of its misery and squashed like the dirty cockroach it is for the sake of all desperate, poor and naive job seeker.

    1 Votes
  • Qu
    QuincH Feb 21, 2015

    ok, I see people have their facts wrong.

    Our child safe kits can save lives. And Sponsored means. That someone close to you thought of you, and helping you to protect their child like they have protected their own children with the Child safe kits.

    Not to mention, we offer discount cards, on prescriptions, vision, hearing and chiropractic services. at 20 to 60% off.

    We offer so many things. When you get a whole life, insurance policy we offer you 6 months free if you lose your job to not pay on your policy but keep your policy, if you have a strike where you work and lose your job you can have up to 6 months each time there is a strike to not pay on your policy but keep your coverage. Just so many things we can do that others don't.

    People get your facts

    -2 Votes
  • Qu
    QuincH Feb 21, 2015

    If you can handle long hours and alot of upfront time and energy and a little money it can change your life. I do good business and work with them for about 6 months now and it offers great policies and I work with great people. To each their own, but Its funny to see people try to talk crap. Can't hack it, get out of the insurance business. It's hard work, and takes time to see pay off. And you'll have amazing paychecks and there are times you will go a week or two with out a paycheck. Over all If you have the right personality and your a go-getter and shoot for the stars .. this is for you.

    Q

    -3 Votes
  • Kb
    KB-J Sep 10, 2014
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    AIL is a waste of time! New laptop, new clothes, countless hours, gas filthy homes and NO MONEY. Secrets and empty promises is all to gain.
    Sacramento, CA

    3 Votes
  • Gr
    Greg Greg Aug 11, 2014

    All of y'all that think it's a scam y'all are complete idiots. I have their insurance and lost my brother and they paid out in less than 24hrs! Name one company that can do that. So because of that I decided to work for the company and I have been nothing but successful here. I'm sorry that all y'all could not handle being successful for yourself. You can gladly go back to your hourly rate while I make 100k+

    -2 Votes

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