FHTM Complaints & Reviews

FHTM Unethical and Dishonest

BEWARE~~Ruel Morton and his business manager Bruce Beam are two people you do not want to get involved with. They are incredibly dishonest. They talk about how they will partner with you in the FHTM business and make all your business dreams come true. Well, be careful. The same was said to me and it did not happen. I was invited to his ranch in east Texas for a business conference. When we got there, we were told to leave our bags at our vehicle and one of the managers would bring them to the "guest" quarters. When my bags were brought to me, they had been damaged quite extensively. Bruce Beam told me that they had been driven over by a tractor and that they would would be replaced and taken care of. The bag that my clothes were in, was completely destroyed but the contents were not damaged. My laptop was in the other bag and obviously was in very bad shape. The screen was smashed and the body of the computer itself was beyond repair. Bruce told me to get it fixed or replaced and let him know and all would be taken care of. I took the computer to a computer repair shop and they informed me that it would cost more to fix than it would to just replace. So I proceeded to do some extensive research to find the best possible price on a replacement computer. After about 2 weeks, I contacted Bruce Beam and told him that I had found a replacement for a much better price and he told me to purchase the computer and send him the receipt for reimbursement. It has now been nearly 2 years and I have yet to receive a reimbursement for the computer. I was told by Bruce Beam, in multiple emails, which I kept, that he was sorry for the delay and that Ruel Morton would send me a check immediately for the cost. I am now very certain, since my emails will no longer be answered, that I will not be reimbursed at all. I am extremely glad that I am no longer "partners" with these people and this lesson, while not cheap, was a lesson that all should be aware of. If they can be so dishonest about this, one can only imagine how dishonest they would continue to be in the business venture. The replacement cost of a laptop computer should be a mere blip on the screen of someone making several million dollars a year.

FHTM FHTM IS AN AMERICAN DREAM

The reason why I indicate that because FHTM which has changed my life so much. Now, I am very interesting in running this business. This company help my income increase significantly. I know some people haven't believed and complained something on FHTM's system. In fact, They are the unsuccessful business people due to some reasons. I think they ran their business go the wrong way. Moreover, they didn't have a strong mind and patient to go straight to their goal. Most American 95% only know the normal way to make money by working for salary and the rest of 5% do business. Why you don't give a chance to your life to make a freedom income similar with my case. The good thing of this business is " WILLABLE, SELLABLE, and TRUSTABLE ASSETS". The last thing I want to say with some unsucessful people that if you are not success to attain your goal, you shouldn't push other people down following your steps. In this difficulty currently economic, a lot of people wish to have a job. Most companies required skills and experience, or degrees. However, in FHTM where give free training without required experience. In fact, 100% business work required investment. Thus, the most simple thing is "NO INVESTMENT, NO INCOME". Then, we talk about the founder - Paul Oberson who has donated so much for poor people and done charity to schools. To me, a company with good owner will be a good place to help a chance for people. Until now, I still remember his sentence that " RESPECT DIFFICULTY, RESPECT DIFFICULTY, AND RESPECT DIFFICULTY".

  • Be
    ben714 Dec 16, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM is an American Dream.
    The reason why I indicate that because FHTM which has changed my life so much. Now, I am very interesting in running this business. This company help my income increase significantly. I know some people haven't believed and complained something on FHTM's system. In fact, They are the unsuccessful business people due to some reasons. I think they ran their business go the wrong way. Moreover, they didn't have a strong mind and patient to go straight to their goal. Most American 95% only know the normal way to make money by working for salary and the rest of 5% do business. Why you don't give a chance to your life to make a freedom income similar with my case. The good thing of this business is " WILLABLE, SELLABLE, and TRUSTABLE ASSETS". The last thing I want to say with some unsucessful people that if you are not success to attain your goal, you shouldn't push other people down following your steps. In this difficulty currently economic, a lot of people wish to have a job. Most companies required skills and experience, or degrees. However, in FHTM where give free training without required experience. In fact, 100% business work required investment. Thus, the most simple thing is "NO INVESTMENT, NO INCOME". Then, we talk about the founder - Paul Oberson who has donated so much for poor people and done charity to schools. To me, a company with good owner will be a good place to help a chance for people. Until now, I still remember his sentence that " RESPECT DIFFICULTY, RESPECT DIFFICULTY, AND RESPECT DIFFICULTY".

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Feb 27, 2011
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    Verified customer

    FHTM is no longer authorized to use the DuPont name, logo, or trademark in any way. FHTM should immediately discontinue the use of any materials containing the DuPont logo. Our right to use DuPont’s name, logo and trademark was revoked because FHTM abused the system by creating and distributing unapproved marketing materials that displayed the DuPont logo.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
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    FHTM is about to change the lives of tens of thousands more when they implode from all of the lawsuits and criminal investigations happening across this great land of ours.

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/73082559/FHTM-named-in-FTC-investigation-of-illegal-companies

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
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    FHTM makes it onto the FTC list of rip-offs. Looks like this company is about to implode

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at ftc.gov/bizopps or youtube.com/FTCvideos.

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/73082559/FHTM-named-in-FTC-investigation-of-illegal-companies

    www.fhtmclassaction.info for all of the details

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 21, 2011
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    Verified customer

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    Attorney General Roy Cooper today joined state attorneys general from across the country and the Federal Trade Commission to announce a national sweep targeting business opportunity scams, including actions against four companies that have targeted North Carolina consumers.
    “When jobs are scarce, claims to help people make money fast become plentiful, ” Cooper said. “Consumers think they’re buying into a great way to earn a living, but they could end up paying far more than they’ll ever make.”

    In challenging economic times, many people in the state are looking for work. Unfortunately, sometimes they find scams instead of legitimate opportunities. Complaints to the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division about business opportunity, work-at-home schemes, and other employment related scams were up 11 percent last year, from 177 complaints in 2009 to 197 complaints in 2010.

    Operation Empty Promises is a national sweep by the FTC, Cooper and other state attorneys general aimed at stopping business opportunity scams and educating consumers about how to avoid them. Announced as part of the sweep are actions taken by Cooper’s Consumer Protection Division against four companies including Fortune Hi Tech Marketing who claims that people who buy into its business earn thousands of dollars a year. Based on consumer complaints, Cooper’s office launched an investigation into FHTM in mid 2010. Consumers say they paid money to the company but were only able to make money by recruiting others into the scheme, not by selling any actual goods or services. A total of 25 consumers have now complained about FHTM, and Cooper’s office is investigating the company. Although this case is currently under investigation, it’s important for consumers to know that a pyramid scheme is a violation of the law and is defined as any plan in which a participant pays money for the chance to receive money upon the introduction of new participants into the program.

    “We’re looking closely at business opportunities that seem to offer false hopes, and also reaching out to educate consumers on how to recognize and avoid fraud, ” Cooper said.

    Later this month, Cooper’s office plans to launch a tool kit to educate consumers on fake business opportunities which will include print, web and video materials. The goal is to prevent North Carolina consumers from losing their hard-earned money to scammers trying to take advantage of a tough employment market.

    “Don’t let scammers use empty promises of jobs with high earnings to take your money, ” Cooper warned consumers. “Before you agree to invest in any business, check it out thoroughly and always be skeptical of claims of guaranteed profits.”

    Cooper has taken action against a number of other kinds of scams fueled by hard times. For example, his Consumer Protection Division has won 13 cases against foreclosure assistance and loan modification scams in the past five years, including two so far in 2011.The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at the FTC website.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 25, 2011
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    Verified customer

    I found this in another blog and thought I would share this interesting comment:

    'Amway' and 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' are the American Dream made Nightmare

    Here are two recent articles from 'USA Today' for your free-thinking readers.

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/retail/2011-02-07-multilevelmarketing03_CV_N.htm

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2010-10-15-multilevelmarketing14_CV_N.htm

    The criminogenic organization known as 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' is an 'Amway' copy-cat. i.e. 'FHTM' is the reality-inverting label over the entrance to yet another self-perpetuating 'MLM business opportunity' cult. 'FHTM' was instigated, and is run, by a gang of exceedingly-greedy, but otherwise-mediocre, little raketeers from Kentucky. These narcissistic parasites have begun to grow rich by peddling an unoriginal lie whilst steadfastly pretending moral and intellectual authority.

    In the adult world of quantifiable reality, the authenticity of the 'FHTM' lie is currently being challenged all over the USA, after the State of Montana charged that 'FHTM' was actually a dissimulated pyramid scheme. However, exactly like the billionaire bosses of the 'Amway' mob, the millionaire bosses of the 'FHTM' mob posed as innocent Christian businessmen/philanthropists under attack and instructed their aggressive echelon of attorneys to negotiate a 'settlement' with the plaintiffs. i.e. Without admitting any fault, they agreed to hand-over a significant chunk of their ill-gotten gains in Montana, in order to continue their clandestine criminal activities elsewhere.

    It is common knowledge in the USA that 'FHTM' is a pernicious blame-the-victim scam http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZxCK4adtuA . Indeed, it is common knowledge in the USA that all so-called 'Multi-Level Marketing' companies are shielding essentially the same, premeditated, closed-market swindle.

    This general video warning has been recently produced by the Bureau of Consumer Protection at the US Federal Trade Commission http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoB2PKYbu4Q . However, it beggars belief that senior FTC officials like Eileen Harrington can use public funds to pretend that the FTC wants to protect the American people from 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, when, for decades, other senior FTC officials have allowed this cancer not only to gnaw its way into the USA, but also into the rest of the world.

    Despite more than half a century of damning-evidence, senior US government trade officials prefer to remain blissfully-ignorant of the fact that behind so-called 'MLM' companies has lurked the ongoing historical phenomenon of criminogenic, or pernicious, cultism. Meanwhile, the self-appointed bosses of these reality-inverting, totalitarian groups continue to rake-in vast fortunes by peddling variations of the same Utopian fiction as fact.

    'MLM business opportunity' fraud is undoubtedly a form of major organized crime spawned in the USA. It should never have been left to ill-informed, and/or corrupt, American regulators to deal with this internal threat to democracy and the rule of law.

    'Amway' and 'FHTM' are the American Dream made Nightmare.

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 31, 2011
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    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I found this blog elsewhere and wanted to share it with you. It is not my work, nor my opinion.

    'Amway' and 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' are the American Dream made Nightmare

    Here are two recent articles from 'USA Today' for your free-thinking readers.
    http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/retail/2011-02-07-multilevelmarketing03_CV_N.htm
    http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2010-10-15-multilevelmarketing14_CV_N.htm

    The criminogenic organization known as 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' is an 'Amway' copy-cat. i.e. 'FHTM' is the reality-inverting label over the entrance to yet another self-perpetuating 'MLM business opportunity' cult. 'FHTM' was instigated, and is run, by a gang of exceedingly-greedy, but otherwise-mediocre, little raketeers from Kentucky. These narcissistic parasites have begun to grow rich by peddling an unoriginal lie whilst steadfastly pretending moral and intellectual authority.

    In the adult world of quantifiable reality, the authenticity of the 'FHTM' lie is currently being challenged all over the USA, after the State of Montana charged that 'FHTM' was actually a dissimulated pyramid scheme. However, exactly like the billionaire bosses of the 'Amway' mob, the millionaire bosses of the 'FHTM' mob posed as innocent Christian businessmen/philanthropists under attack and instructed their aggressive echelon of attorneys to negotiate a 'settlement' with the plaintiffs. i.e. Without admitting any fault, they agreed to hand-over a significant chunk of their ill-gotten gains in Montana, in order to continue their clandestine criminal activities elsewhere.

    It is common knowledge in the USA that 'FHTM' is a pernicious blame-the-victim scam http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZxCK4adtuA . Indeed, it is common knowledge in the USA that all so-called 'Multi-Level Marketing' companies are shielding essentially the same, premeditated, closed-market swindle.

    This general video warning has been recently produced by the Bureau of Consumer Protection at the US Federal Trade Commission http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoB2PKYbu4Q . However, it beggars belief that senior FTC officials like Eileen Harrington can use public funds to pretend that the FTC wants to protect the American people from 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, when, for decades, other senior FTC officials have allowed this cancer not only to gnaw its way into the USA, but also into the rest of the world.

    Despite more than half a century of damning-evidence, senior US government trade officials prefer to remain blissfully-ignorant of the fact that behind so-called 'MLM' companies has lurked the ongoing historical phenomenon of criminogenic, or pernicious, cultism. Meanwhile, the self-appointed bosses of these reality-inverting, totalitarian groups continue to rake-in vast fortunes by peddling variations of the same Utopian fiction as fact.

    'MLM business opportunity' fraud is undoubtedly a form of major organized crime spawned in the USA. It should never have been left to ill-informed, and/or corrupt, American regulators to deal with this internal threat to democracy and the rule of law.

    'Amway' and 'FHTM' are the American Dream made Nightmare.
    David Brear (copyright 2011)

    0 Votes
  • Kn
    Kncan Jul 09, 2011

    This is a real opportunity if treated with the respect and effort that must be put forth with any new business venture. It takes work, persistence and some other common things, like integrity to be successful at this are any think else!

    This is no different from that aspect, however my few short months with this company has been very positive. It has worked when I have worked it.
    Furthermore I'm more excited about the potential then when I joined 6 months ago. With other business interest I have built this part time. I have been very rewarded for the effort to date.

    Does that mean it has been easy? No! Simple yes. One of the best things about this business and worst are the same. People.
    But it is also the power. This is truly a pay it forward opportunity.

    So when viewing google and other opinions. Get the facts.
    Google lawsuits on google from google, you want see any.
    Now check the same thing about google from yahoo and low and behold.

    Be careful of your sources it can lead to a very bad decision.
    Most of the complaints once you dig deeper is bunch of whiners, most probably never succeed at much of any thing else. Most go by the vain of my uplink didn't help me etc. Bunch of whiners

    Kyle


    Kyle

    0 Votes

FHTM Lets do something about this.

Hi everyone, Im pretty much in the same situation as everyone here. My family member to advantage of my trust and thats why I am here. Myself and my better half have been doing a lot of research on this company. I think that if we can all get together we can do something about this. Nothings gonna happen overnight ... but we can do this. Please email me with your story ... and join the contact list to build our own pyramid ... we'll use their formula to bring them down. Are you ready? [protected]@yahoo.ca

  • Fh
    FHTM Advocate Mar 03, 2011

    If you and your better half were actually doing thorough research on FHTM you would be noting that there are many positive aspects to this business. Using Google and only choosing to read the negative reports is not research. Research involves a complete investigation and includes examining the pros and cons of an issue. I see no positivity in your report whatsoever and there are many FHTM success stories. None of which involve any form of scamming anyone. For starters a networking marketing company is not a pyramid scam and the Canadian Government would never sanction the business or collect taxes from it if it were. It sounds as if you joined the business and assumed you could just sit back and have the dollars roll in. Just like with any other business you actually need to work in order to be successful at it. If you aren't willing to put forth some effort then don't expect rewards. I personally feel sorry for the person that brought you on board their team as it seems you expected to ride the road to success on their back. Do some work. Oh and while you are at it work a little harder at improving your research skills.

    1 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Cut the crap. You can work till the cows come home and never make it to the top in FHTM (unless you are personally picked by Paul to succeed). There is NO proof anywhere to substantiate any of the lies that are told by FHTM and the Presidential Ambassadors. No facts to back up any of thier lies. There are however, dozens of things that have been proven LIES!

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at ftc.gov/bizopps or youtube.com/FTCvideos.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Apr 08, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Courtesy of Corporate Frauds Watch
    In 'MLM business opportunity' frauds, direct association with trusted brands has been a lie by Shyam

    In a previous post, I drew your free-thinking readers' attention to some remarkable optical illusions which clearly demonstrate that the human mind can be easily deceived simply by changing the context in which we see things http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-11553099 . A stalking-panther, when photographed in a jungle environment, is almost invisible to the human eye if shown only in black and white, but the same dangerous predator is immediately obvious to us when shown in color. Two squares of identical color and shade, appear to be of completely different color and shade when each one is surrounded by squares which alter the context in which our minds automatically see them.

    No one now seriously disputes that deluded, core-'MLM' adherents look at 'MLM business opportunity' frauds only in two dimensions, 'positive' and 'negative.' A growing mountain of quantifiable evidence proves that vast numbers of ill-informed people have been deceived into entering this style of camouflaged totalitarian cult, then, on the pretext that 'the duplication of a step-by-step positive plan will lead to success, ' they have been intellectually-castrated (without their fully-informed consent) so that their minds will only accept what their leaders have arbitrarily defined as 'positive, ' and to exclude what these same charlatans have arbitrarily defined as 'negative.' When seen only in the fake 'positive' context of: 'Business', 'Independence', 'Financial Freedom', 'Direct Selling', 'Low Risk', 'Income Opportunity', etc. 'MLM business opportunity' frauds can appear to be authentic. This dangerous inversion of reality has been further confirmed by (apparently independent) : celebrity endorsements, glossy-advertizing, 'Direct Selling Associations', etc.; all of which form a pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity, because all these artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts have actually been financed by the profits of fraud in order to continue to perpetrate the same fraud. It is only when you take 'MLM business opportunity' frauds out of their artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts, that their true, predatory nature becomes immediately obvious.

    One of the most-deceptive, fake 'positive' contexts in which 'MLM business opportunity' frauds have been presented is there apparent direct association with trusted brands. Currently, in the USA, the millionaire racketeers behind the 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' lie are being challenged in court for having pretended direct association with some of America's most famous companies: including: General Electric, DuPont, Time, Verizon Wireless and AT&T, Travelocity, Peter Lamas and BSP Rewards Mall. For, according to documents presented in court, none of these companies has ever had a direct association with 'FHTM.' Furthermore, the officers of all these companies were actually unaware that their valuable brand-names and trademarks were being used by racketeers to commit fraud. The only connection that the 'FHTM' fake has had with all these authentic companies is that 'FHTM' has been a corporate customer of their products and services. Yet again, the use of this devious technique of psychological persuasion has been copied from the original 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, 'Amway.'

    According to an 'FHTM' whistleblower, Joseph Isaacs: 'When these companies find out that their trademarks, names, logos and reputations are being used by FHTM in order to aide FHTM in proving its legitimacy they will issue a cease and desist order, insist on actions to stop or not allow FHTM to market their products'. Indeed, currently every one of the companies listed above has either issued a cease and desist order against 'FHTM, ' or no longer allows itself to be aligned with 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing.'

    Again, according to Joseph Isaacs, 'FHTM leaders would systematically tell prospects during presentations that FHTM must be legal, because no iconic Fortune 100 company would affiliate with a scam' and that 'all of these major companies had sent their CEO’s and legal teams to meet with FHTM founder, Paul Orberson, to evaluate his MLM company.' Self-evidently these scripted-lies were part of an overall pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity.

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

    1 Votes
  • Do
    Dojie Jul 04, 2011

    Behind your investigation that all their fake pretention of being partners with these fortune 100 compnies and being proven and fined by the Montana Court why not issue a legal order to cease and desist from all the States that they are operating. I believe too that FHTM is focus in recruitment of people of the United State to get rich quick and hanging all Indepentdent Representatives of the "Empty Promises". Happy 4th of July 2011 and God Bless America.

    1 Votes

FHTM MLM Companies (such as FHTM) Have a Bad Name

Many individuals can be very skeptical toward multi-level marketing (MLM) companies (specifically towards Fortune High-Tech Marketing (FHTM)). Many are quick to assume that all MLM companies are illegal pyramid schemes that don’t even offer real products or are disguised as a business by using various products. It’s not shocking that many people are fearful about join a MLM network. They can’t help but wonder if they will get ripped off. Some former representatives (reps) from FHTM claim they got ripped off. Reps who do well at the company argue that the people who complain are the ones who are not making enough effort to network market and are unhappy with how much they end up making from the company. Reps who feel ripped off may have broken even with how much they spent on signing up with FHTM. This can happen is a rep is not proactive and does not purchase the products in the FHTM network.

It’s a too bad that there are companies out there that have ripped people off by trying to scam people with a high value product that is worth a tiny fraction of the original price. No one likes to feel as if they have been tricked or manipulated
Another reason why MLM companies, such as FHTM, have a bad name is merely because people are misinformed about the company. Some people just do not understand the concept of network marketing. People tend to know about Amway and Mary Kay. Sometimes it helps Reps to explain to potential customers how FHTM shares some similarities with these companies.

Many times in life, a person or company or organization gets a bad name because there are misunderstandings, lack of information and angry individuals who feel the need to exaggerate. When former reps from FHTM don’t reach their financial goals, they become disenchanted with the system. The network marketing system only works for people who constantly make an effort to make it work.

  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Feb 27, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM is no longer authorized to use the DuPont name, logo, or trademark in any way. FHTM should immediately discontinue the use of any materials containing the DuPont logo. Our right to use DuPont’s name, logo and trademark was revoked because FHTM abused the system by creating and distributing unapproved marketing materials that displayed the DuPont logo.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM makes it onto the FTC list of rip-offs. Looks like this company is about to implode

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at ftc.gov/bizopps or youtube.com/FTCvideos.

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/73082559/FHTM-named-in-FTC-investigation-of-illegal-companies

    www.fhtmclassaction.info for all of the details

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Apr 08, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Courtesy of Corporate Frauds Watch
    In 'MLM business opportunity' frauds, direct association with trusted brands has been a lie by Shyam

    In a previous post, I drew your free-thinking readers' attention to some remarkable optical illusions which clearly demonstrate that the human mind can be easily deceived simply by changing the context in which we see things http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-11553099 . A stalking-panther, when photographed in a jungle environment, is almost invisible to the human eye if shown only in black and white, but the same dangerous predator is immediately obvious to us when shown in color. Two squares of identical color and shade, appear to be of completely different color and shade when each one is surrounded by squares which alter the context in which our minds automatically see them.

    No one now seriously disputes that deluded, core-'MLM' adherents look at 'MLM business opportunity' frauds only in two dimensions, 'positive' and 'negative.' A growing mountain of quantifiable evidence proves that vast numbers of ill-informed people have been deceived into entering this style of camouflaged totalitarian cult, then, on the pretext that 'the duplication of a step-by-step positive plan will lead to success, ' they have been intellectually-castrated (without their fully-informed consent) so that their minds will only accept what their leaders have arbitrarily defined as 'positive, ' and to exclude what these same charlatans have arbitrarily defined as 'negative.' When seen only in the fake 'positive' context of: 'Business', 'Independence', 'Financial Freedom', 'Direct Selling', 'Low Risk', 'Income Opportunity', etc. 'MLM business opportunity' frauds can appear to be authentic. This dangerous inversion of reality has been further confirmed by (apparently independent) : celebrity endorsements, glossy-advertizing, 'Direct Selling Associations', etc.; all of which form a pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity, because all these artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts have actually been financed by the profits of fraud in order to continue to perpetrate the same fraud. It is only when you take 'MLM business opportunity' frauds out of their artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts, that their true, predatory nature becomes immediately obvious.

    One of the most-deceptive, fake 'positive' contexts in which 'MLM business opportunity' frauds have been presented is there apparent direct association with trusted brands. Currently, in the USA, the millionaire racketeers behind the 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' lie are being challenged in court for having pretended direct association with some of America's most famous companies: including: General Electric, DuPont, Time, Verizon Wireless and AT&T, Travelocity, Peter Lamas and BSP Rewards Mall. For, according to documents presented in court, none of these companies has ever had a direct association with 'FHTM.' Furthermore, the officers of all these companies were actually unaware that their valuable brand-names and trademarks were being used by racketeers to commit fraud. The only connection that the 'FHTM' fake has had with all these authentic companies is that 'FHTM' has been a corporate customer of their products and services. Yet again, the use of this devious technique of psychological persuasion has been copied from the original 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, 'Amway.'

    According to an 'FHTM' whistleblower, Joseph Isaacs: 'When these companies find out that their trademarks, names, logos and reputations are being used by FHTM in order to aide FHTM in proving its legitimacy they will issue a cease and desist order, insist on actions to stop or not allow FHTM to market their products'. Indeed, currently every one of the companies listed above has either issued a cease and desist order against 'FHTM, ' or no longer allows itself to be aligned with 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing.'

    Again, according to Joseph Isaacs, 'FHTM leaders would systematically tell prospects during presentations that FHTM must be legal, because no iconic Fortune 100 company would affiliate with a scam' and that 'all of these major companies had sent their CEO’s and legal teams to meet with FHTM founder, Paul Orberson, to evaluate his MLM company.' Self-evidently these scripted-lies were part of an overall pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity.

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

    0 Votes
  • Cr
    crazyjipi Jul 03, 2011

    If these frauds still ongoing and the cases filed with the FTC are legitimate and with solid evidences that this FHTM is a pyramid scam why not issue an order from the Department of Justice -Kentucky or from Washington D.C. a temporary closure or permanently, unless reasonable doubts have been proven otherwise. If those America's most famous companies has ever had any direct association with FHTM they must also file complaint against the racketeer (Paul Orberson-Founder) and shall request from DOJ to issue a cease and desist order against FHTM to stop marketing their products and services. Whatever FTC decision and appropriate legal action against FHTM it may take, the results will be a big whistleblow to all "Racketeers" or "MLM Companies" that are doing the same concept. The best outcome of the case will open the eyes of the many people of the United States to look for a legit Company open jobs with decent pay and will help the government to decrease the rate of unemployment and increase the percentage of tax filers. God Bless America.

    0 Votes

FHTM Representatives

My complaint is that it gets extremely tiring to read of the stories where people feel they were mislead and left to fend for themselves while working FHTM. Let's be clear... FHTM is a company that gathers loyal customers for the companies it represents...and shares that concept with other people. That simple.

For the ones who need to have their hand held every step of the way...this business may not be a great fit for you. For those who choose to be proactive and take initiative? Go for it with FHTM.

Dish Network, Verizon, DuPont, GE, etc...all choose to partner with FHTM. Something good must be happening...

  • Ra
    RaymondW Sep 15, 2010

    Jkse, sooner or later regulators will also get tired of receiving thousands of complaints with consumers being mislead. Two States had to order a temp cease and desist and fined the company for misleading consumers and operating an alleged pyramid scheme. I now see that a class action lawsuit was issued by former reps, the whole lawsuit is online to read.

    The thing about the loyal customer sales-pitch, is that sales-reps are the customer, with hardly any outside sales. With a high drop-out rate there is no loyalty in that. FHTM reps are not saving the companies they market for any advertising dollars, not when so many people leave the company. In fact I just found out that Jim Miles, former Sec of State for S.C., and his wife Betty Miles left FHTM. Many FHTM reps would use Jim Miles name to give some kind of credibility to the company. I'm guessing Jim and Betty didn't like what has happened over the past year, but that is my opinion.

    And one last point: your comment "Dish Network, Verizon, DuPont, GE, etc...all choose to partner with FHTM"

    I think you better re-read the cease and desist order from Montana about partnerships with FHTM and look at Exhibit B through Exhibit E as evidences. I love what GE had to say,

    "Forutne Hi-Tech does not have a direct relationship with GE Security, Inc or GE. Fortune purchase GE Security products from Protect America. Protect America is a GE Security authorized dealer.
    Thank you for bringing the inappropriate use of the GE trademark to our attention. We will contact FHTM and Protect America to address the issues."

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Feb 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    According to FHTM:
    FHTM is no longer authorized to use the DuPont name, logo, or trademark in any way. FHTM should immediately discontinue the use of any materials containing the DuPont logo. Our right to use DuPont’s name, logo and trademark was revoked because FHTM abused the system by creating and distributing unapproved marketing materials that displayed the DuPont logo.

    According to the real world:
    How can this be true when the DuPont logo has been part of the FHTM corporate created business presentation DVD for years? The only reason they blame the reps for this is to shield themselves from a major trademark infringement lawsuit. FHTM never had a partnership or any relationship with DuPont, yet they took it upon themselves to represent they did in an effort to make themselves legal. Surprise…surprise.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM makes it onto the FTC list of rip-offs. Looks like this company is about to implode

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at ftc.gov/bizopps or youtube.com/FTCvideos.

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/73082559/FHTM-named-in-FTC-investigation-of-illegal-companies

    www.fhtmclassaction.info for all of the details

    0 Votes

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FHTM Is FHTM a Get Rich Scam?

Fortune High-Tech Marketing (FHTM) happens to be a relationship marketing company that allows individuals to build their own business by marketing FHTM’s countless outstanding products and services. This company has allowed representatives to reach some of their financial goals. FHTM a not “get rich quick scam.” FHTM offers a wide variety of products and services that many families are already using or consuming. Members of FHTM are able to earn money when a friend, family member or acquaintance purchases a product or service through their FHTM business and when the representative gets others to join the program. There is not a partnership between the companies (that are included in the network) and FHTM but more of a working relationship. Here is an extensive list of companies included in FHTMs network:
• True Essentials
• Flying Basset Organics
• Trothop
• Dish Network
• Magazines.com
• World Tour
• Wireless Shop
• TCI LOng Distance
• Voice Connect
• Digital Landing

  • An
    AngryAndSad Aug 26, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    It's an IQ test

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 25, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    'Amway' and 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' are the American Dream made Nightmare
    I found this on another blog and thought I would share it here.

    Here are two recent articles from 'USA Today' for your free-thinking readers.

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/retail/2011-02-07-multilevelmarketing03_CV_N.htm

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2010-10-15-multilevelmarketing14_CV_N.htm

    The criminogenic organization known as 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' is an 'Amway' copy-cat. i.e. 'FHTM' is the reality-inverting label over the entrance to yet another self-perpetuating 'MLM business opportunity' cult. 'FHTM' was instigated, and is run, by a gang of exceedingly-greedy, but otherwise-mediocre, little raketeers from Kentucky. These narcissistic parasites have begun to grow rich by peddling an unoriginal lie whilst steadfastly pretending moral and intellectual authority.

    In the adult world of quantifiable reality, the authenticity of the 'FHTM' lie is currently being challenged all over the USA, after the State of Montana charged that 'FHTM' was actually a dissimulated pyramid scheme. However, exactly like the billionaire bosses of the 'Amway' mob, the millionaire bosses of the 'FHTM' mob posed as innocent Christian businessmen/philanthropists under attack and instructed their aggressive echelon of attorneys to negotiate a 'settlement' with the plaintiffs. i.e. Without admitting any fault, they agreed to hand-over a significant chunk of their ill-gotten gains in Montana, in order to continue their clandestine criminal activities elsewhere.

    It is common knowledge in the USA that 'FHTM' is a pernicious blame-the-victim scam http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZxCK4adtuA . Indeed, it is common knowledge in the USA that all so-called 'Multi-Level Marketing' companies are shielding essentially the same, premeditated, closed-market swindle.

    This general video warning has been recently produced by the Bureau of Consumer Protection at the US Federal Trade Commission http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoB2PKYbu4Q . However, it beggars belief that senior FTC officials like Eileen Harrington can use public funds to pretend that the FTC wants to protect the American people from 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, when, for decades, other senior FTC officials have allowed this cancer not only to gnaw its way into the USA, but also into the rest of the world.

    Despite more than half a century of damning-evidence, senior US government trade officials prefer to remain blissfully-ignorant of the fact that behind so-called 'MLM' companies has lurked the ongoing historical phenomenon of criminogenic, or pernicious, cultism. Meanwhile, the self-appointed bosses of these reality-inverting, totalitarian groups continue to rake-in vast fortunes by peddling variations of the same Utopian fiction as fact.

    'MLM business opportunity' fraud is undoubtedly a form of major organized crime spawned in the USA. It should never have been left to ill-informed, and/or corrupt, American regulators to deal with this internal threat to democracy and the rule of law.

    'Amway' and 'FHTM' are the American Dream made Nightmare.

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

    0 Votes

FHTM How to Avoid MLM Scams

Tips on Avoiding MLM Scams

There are many reasons why individuals steer clear of multi-level marketing (MLM) companies. Most believe they will get scammed. Web sites such as Complaints Board include countless negative comments about MLM companies, specifically Fortune High-Tech Marketing (FHTM). Some people are skeptical to try network marketing because it’s a different way to do business. It’s not for everyone, but those who master it can make a decent living. However, there are scams out there that should be avoided.

If individuals are so worried that they will lose money by trying network marketing, they need to do a significant amount of research and educate themselves about the specific MLM business they are interested in. Listed below are 5 tips on how to avoid joining a MLM business that might be a scam.

1. Research! Research! Research! Find out if the company has a physical address for its headquarters. Get the names and email addresses of management. Use Google to do the work for you.

2. Read the company’s Web site carefully. Make sure there are real products and services offered. Some scams don’t have any type of product exchanged.

3. Understand how individuals make money at the company. Make sure that the company is not requiring you to purchase too much expensive office equipment. Make sure that the set up fee is not ridiculously high.

4. Get feedback about the specific MLM company from individuals who currently work there. Ask them the pros and cons of working for that company.

5. Make sure that you have an idea how much you can make working for a few months at the MLM company you are researching. Ask other representatives how long it took them to make enough money to make joining the MLM program worth their time.

If you would like to learn about Fortune High-Tech Marketing, go to: www.FHTM.net

  • Da
    dalia n f Apr 06, 2011

    i just singing yesterday and what to know more a but it .

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Apr 08, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Courtesy of Corporate Frauds Watch
    In 'MLM business opportunity' frauds, direct association with trusted brands has been a lie by Shyam

    In a previous post, I drew your free-thinking readers' attention to some remarkable optical illusions which clearly demonstrate that the human mind can be easily deceived simply by changing the context in which we see things http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-11553099 . A stalking-panther, when photographed in a jungle environment, is almost invisible to the human eye if shown only in black and white, but the same dangerous predator is immediately obvious to us when shown in color. Two squares of identical color and shade, appear to be of completely different color and shade when each one is surrounded by squares which alter the context in which our minds automatically see them.

    No one now seriously disputes that deluded, core-'MLM' adherents look at 'MLM business opportunity' frauds only in two dimensions, 'positive' and 'negative.' A growing mountain of quantifiable evidence proves that vast numbers of ill-informed people have been deceived into entering this style of camouflaged totalitarian cult, then, on the pretext that 'the duplication of a step-by-step positive plan will lead to success, ' they have been intellectually-castrated (without their fully-informed consent) so that their minds will only accept what their leaders have arbitrarily defined as 'positive, ' and to exclude what these same charlatans have arbitrarily defined as 'negative.' When seen only in the fake 'positive' context of: 'Business', 'Independence', 'Financial Freedom', 'Direct Selling', 'Low Risk', 'Income Opportunity', etc. 'MLM business opportunity' frauds can appear to be authentic. This dangerous inversion of reality has been further confirmed by (apparently independent) : celebrity endorsements, glossy-advertizing, 'Direct Selling Associations', etc.; all of which form a pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity, because all these artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts have actually been financed by the profits of fraud in order to continue to perpetrate the same fraud. It is only when you take 'MLM business opportunity' frauds out of their artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts, that their true, predatory nature becomes immediately obvious.

    One of the most-deceptive, fake 'positive' contexts in which 'MLM business opportunity' frauds have been presented is there apparent direct association with trusted brands. Currently, in the USA, the millionaire racketeers behind the 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' lie are being challenged in court for having pretended direct association with some of America's most famous companies: including: General Electric, DuPont, Time, Verizon Wireless and AT&T, Travelocity, Peter Lamas and BSP Rewards Mall. For, according to documents presented in court, none of these companies has ever had a direct association with 'FHTM.' Furthermore, the officers of all these companies were actually unaware that their valuable brand-names and trademarks were being used by racketeers to commit fraud. The only connection that the 'FHTM' fake has had with all these authentic companies is that 'FHTM' has been a corporate customer of their products and services. Yet again, the use of this devious technique of psychological persuasion has been copied from the original 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, 'Amway.'

    According to an 'FHTM' whistleblower, Joseph Isaacs: 'When these companies find out that their trademarks, names, logos and reputations are being used by FHTM in order to aide FHTM in proving its legitimacy they will issue a cease and desist order, insist on actions to stop or not allow FHTM to market their products'. Indeed, currently every one of the companies listed above has either issued a cease and desist order against 'FHTM, ' or no longer allows itself to be aligned with 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing.'

    Again, according to Joseph Isaacs, 'FHTM leaders would systematically tell prospects during presentations that FHTM must be legal, because no iconic Fortune 100 company would affiliate with a scam' and that 'all of these major companies had sent their CEO’s and legal teams to meet with FHTM founder, Paul Orberson, to evaluate his MLM company.' Self-evidently these scripted-lies were part of an overall pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity.

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

    -1 Votes
  • Ca
    cacitybird Sep 14, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Check this out RE: FHTM
    http://youtu.be/ko0idFAx-A4

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    bankalchemist May 13, 2013

    Barbara Bushe is really Joseph Isaacs or SKAPEGOAT in the flesh. He post under many different tags. His new release SKAPEGOAT deserves a 5 porcelain throne award with ONE power flush notation. Being released in paper back it allows the reader to recycle the pages already read as TP to complete the necessary paper work when taking an Isaacs. Its been eluded to that Dennis Rodman may play Isaacs in the movie adaptation.

    0 Votes

FHTM Is FHTM a Scam?

Many people wonder if Fortune High Tech Marketing (FHTM) is a scam or not. IS Amway a scam? Is Mary Kay a scam? Well, these companies actually happen to be a relationship marketing companies that allows individuals to build their own business by marketing countless products and services. FHTM has allowed me (along with thousands of others) to reach financial goals. In no way is FHTM a “get rich quick scam.” I know a rep who had to personally invest a lot of time and energy at the convenience of his home office before he started to make over $3, 000 a month.His story is real and there is less mystery to his success than many people might realize. After he paid a set up fee (which is now $199) to get started at FHTM and a small fee for a Web site, he was equipped with many of the tools he needed to start his own business as a representative. This particular rep had to review his bills and make a few changes about which companies he bought products and services from.He told me that some people find it a little inconvenient to change their cell phone carrier or buy a different brand of shampoo. He was actually able to get back a percentage of his bills back when he bought from the companies in FHTM’s network. Anyway, after he got 10 points, or bought ten products or services each month (from the companies in FHTMs) network, he saw a return on my investment. The rep also saw a return on his investment when he got others to buy products and services from his virtual store. He said he would recommend this Web site for anyone who joins FHTM. It just makes the whole buying process a lot easier. There is potential for individuals to make extra money by working as a network marketor. They just need to realize that it involves alot of work. Those who have a gift for selling would most likely do well at FHTM.

  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM makes it onto the FTC list of rip-offs. Looks like this company is about to implode

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at ftc.gov/bizopps or youtube.com/FTCvideos.

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/73082559/FHTM-named-in-FTC-investigation-of-illegal-companies

    www.fhtmclassaction.info for all of the details

    1 Votes
  • Jm
    J.M. R Jun 04, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM is a scam 100% they use big numbers in earnings to get you in stating that you spend the same on your cell phone and cable tv and vitimins and othwe household items and dont get any return . All of the people who were supposed to be making from $50, 000.00 per to $250.000.00 per month dont seem to be out publicly braging now maybe because it qwas all a lie, or extremely over quoted.

    0 Votes
  • Fh
    fhtmfacts Jan 06, 2013

    Status updateon the real FHTM By Darla DiGrandi
    For those of you that do not already know, I have left Fortune and moved to a new Network Marketing Company. Below are the reasons why.

    Nearly 5 years ago a local business owner introduced me to a Network Marketing company. I saw a way to save & make some extra money on things I was already doing and using. I had no idea at the time where it would lead me and it ended up saving my life at that time from the recession.

    It eventually retired me from the hair industry and taught me a new industry that I LOVE today! An industry that is based upon people
    helping people where your success is measured by how many people on your team are making money and achieving their goals!

    That is also when I met my Trainer Scott Aguilar, who said to me, “If you will trust me, I will help you buy your life back”. From there I
    went on to make over $1 million dollars in that company and promoted to the top position in less than 2 years.

    Facts & Numbers don’t lie, people do!

    > Our first year in the business we ranked #25 in the USA and made over $300, 000 and had many people making over $5, 000 a month with a team of less than 3000 people.

    > This past 2012 they combined the USA & Canada numbers together & we ranked #13 overall (#11 in USA), up 14 spots from our first year. But… listen closely when I tell you we made about $100, 000 LESS than our first year! And ONLY one person on our team of over 25, 000 people is currently making more than $5, 000 a month.

    > We have been on the top 15 GLOBAL leader board 53 of the past 57 months. This proves we are producers in the company and not just lucky. We used to make $20-$40k a month and now its $8-$15k. And still on the top 15 GLOBAL leader board.

    > We have consistently ranked higher each year, yet made less EACH year. If we had ranked lower in the top money earners and made less money, that would be a clear indication that most of the problem was us. But what does it tell you when our income goes down EACH year while our ranking goes up? That it’s not us, it’s the “system”!

    > The norm for nationwide weekly presentation meetings used to be 100-300 people in attendance and monthly trainings with 500-1000, prompting Training Centers to open across the country to handle all the growth. Now weekly meetings are a dozen at best and there are not even meetings in some of those locations and Training Centers are being shut down.

    > My first full year there was approx 5, 000 people at the annual convention for which I was the emcee. This past year I was also one of the emcees and there was approx 2, 500 in attendance (half the size).

    > Many leaders are making their lowest pay in their careers and cant even make their FREE BMW payment. Having 70 Executives in my down line, I am able to see their numbers and it breaks my heart to see that NONE of those 70 ESMs are doubling their E code! These are good hard working people struggling with the “What am I doing wrong” syndrome.

    > Not to mention how many Pres Ambassadors, Platinum’s and Nationals are making less than $5, 000 per month and having to go back to getting jobs to pay their bills. These are good people that know how to build a team. Once again it’s not them, it’s the “system”.

    > I am one of the hardest working people in this company and probably in the industry. If I can’t help good, hard working people make money, then it’s time to take a step back and look at the “Big Picture”.

    After YEARS of CONSTANT compensation plan changes and product & service changes, this is not the same company I joined nearly 5 years ago. Leaving our company is not something we wanted to do. It was something that as a leader, we need to do. Leaders are responsible for taking people towards their WHY, not away from it. We did not take this decision lightly. It was a grueling decision. But we could no longer sit back and ignore “the writing on the walls”.

    When I started, I didn’t even know the name of the company. I trusted in a person that I met named Scott Aguilar. I had a WHY. It was to set my family free and get out of debt and it was his role to help me get there.

    Before we made this decision, we took time to reflect on all the above facts, did a lot of research, took our concerns directly to the founder, prayed for vision and direction, asked a lot of questions to Industry leaders and ALSO to people who have previously left our company that are having tremendous success in other companies.

    We chose our new company based on the 4 balances of business: The Company, The System, The Support & The Product.

    In closing I leave you with this thought: You’re on a cross-country journey with your loved ones trying to get to your goals and dreams. One of your tires has a hole in it and you have to keep stopping to put Fix-A-Flat in it every few miles. Praying everyday you don’t get a blow out and that you make it a little further till the next stop. Fix A Flat can only go so far and last so long!

    Wouldn’t it make more sense to stop the constant stress n struggle and change the tire?

    This letter is being released to address the rumors and lies that are being spread by those at the VERY top of the corporate company and the PA and PSM at the top of the west coast. The company plans to “recode” my former team to this PA and PSM. Another Fix-A-Flat attempt. The objective from the tops is to make Scott & I look greedy and lazy and to make our new comp plan look bad.

    I am proud to be a Network Marketer! I will stay in this Industry because it is the only industry that allows me to lead an army to their
    dreams! We are EXCITED about the future and getting back to our goal of helping people achieve their goals.

    Take time to research and reflect back on the facts in your business. Don’t listen to hear say or rumors. Ask to see proof of current income from people at the top or that are trying to recode you. Call me if you have any questions 760-578-7183 and if you want me to keep it confidential, I will!

    0 Votes

FHTM Seeking Canadian feedback

I am considering becoming a FHTM rep and am doing my due dilligence on the company and have read the comments on the site. Is there anyone who is working this business in Toronto or Ontario in General that can provide some objective comments on their experince as a rep.
I would love to have some feedback form you.
I am NOT biased by the Stigma associated with MLM in society as a whole, i just want to hear from people that are doing the business in the area i indicated above. Dream stealer,

  • Ck
    ckmm Aug 24, 2010

    rbv..have you already sign up with fhtm ?

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Sep 25, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    A class action lawsuit was filed against Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing (FHTM), its officers, directors, Presidential Ambassadors and all National Sales Managers claiming fraud, pyramid scheme and RICO violations in the Eastern District of the Federal Courts on September 2, 2010

    Defendants listed in the lawsuit include:
    Paul C. Orberson, Jeff Orberson, Thomas A. Mills, David Mills, Billy Stahl, Simon Davies, Ruel Morton, Todd Rowland, Ashley Rowland, Todd & Ashley, Inc., Mike Misenheimer, Steve Jordan, Joel McNinch, Chris Doyle, Ken Brown, Jerry Brown, Bob Decant, Joanne McMahon, Terry Walker, Sandi Walker, Sherri Winter, Trey Knight, Kevin Mullins, Scott Aguilar, Molly Aguilar, Nathan Kirby, Dwayne Brown, Aaron Decker, Susan Frank, Ramiro Armenta, Angelina Armenta, Alexis Adame, Teresa Adame, Darla DiGrandi, Matt Morse, Matt Barrett and Roberto Rivera


    This is an action by plaintiffs on behalf of themselves and those similarly situated to recover damages caused by the defendants' operation of an inherently fraudulent pyramid scheme. The pyramid scheme is fraudulent because it requires the payment by participants of money to defendant Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing, Inc. ("Fortune"), in return for which participants receive (1) the right to sell products and (2) the right to receive in return for recruiting other participants into the program rewards which are unrelated to sale of the product to ultimate users.

    This action is brought on behalf of a national class of persons who serve or have served as independent representatives for Fortune, pursuant to the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1961-1968 ("RICO"), the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act, KRS Chapter 367, and the laws of Kentucky.

    Under the Compensation Plan utilized by Fortune until at least July 1, 2010, IRs are able to earn compensation from two sources: (1) bonuses for recruiting and sponsoring new representatives; and (2) commissions from sales of products and services by themselves and by recruits in their "downline.

    Fortune operates as an illegal pyramid scheme because this compensation plan affords IRs the right to receive in return for recruiting other participants into Fortune rewards which are unrelated to the sale of products or services to ultimate users outside of Fortune. Fortune's compensation plan involves an elaborate set of bonuses which are effectively the only way to earn money in Fortune and which are all tied not to real sales to outside customers, but rather to recruitment of new IRs.

    To perpetuate the fraudulent pyramid scheme described above, Fortune claims to have special relationships with or to be a "partner" of several large major national companies whose products and services Fortune offers. These companies include, but are not limited to, AT&T, Verizon Wireless, Sprint, Dish Networks, General Electric Security ("GE Security"), DuPont and Home Depot. Fortune has used the trademarks of these and other companies in marketing materials and business presentations in order to convince prospective customers that Fortune is a legal business. In reality, Fortune does not have any sort of special relationship with these companies. Fortune is not a "partner" with Dish Networks. Rather it is a third-party independent contractor authorized to sell Dish Networks service. There are numerous other such third-party vendors of Dish Network.

    All of the defendants in this action collectively form an "enterprise" under RICO, 18 U.S.C. § 1962, in that they are a group of individuals and entities associated in fact, although not a legal entity.

    The defendants' promotion of an illegal pyramid scheme is a per se scheme to defraud under the mail and wire fraud statutes; thus, the defendants have committed racketeering acts by promoting an illegal pyramid scheme by using and causing others to use the mail and by transmitting and causing others to transmit, by means of wire in interstate commerce, writing, signs, signals, pictures and sounds, all in furtherance of and for purposes of executing a scheme or artifice to defraud, namely an illegal pyramid scheme.

    www.fhtmclassaction.info

    0 Votes
  • Jo
    JohnnieYen Oct 14, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I am surprised that your comment was not answered. You have one person who wants to know if you already joined and another BARBARA who is regurgitating a bunch of legal BS. I am a successful rep in vancouver and if you message me I will give you the name of a successful rep in Toronto. If Fortune was a pyramid then 1. It wouldn't have lasted 10 years!!! and 2. HUGE companies like GE, Dupont and Walmart wouldn't want to be associated at all with fortune. There are a lot of negative opinions out there on the net but they are only opinions, not facts. If I was a college professor and someone handed in a term paper and cited google as their source, I would definately fail them!!! LOL

    -1 Votes
  • FHTM - Scam Oct 15, 2010

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2010-10-15-multilevelmarketing14_CV_N.htm?csp=34money&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UsatodaycomMoney-TopStories+%28Money+-+Top+Stories%29&utm_content=My+Yahoo

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Nov 28, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Fortune Hi-Tech: American dream or pyramid scheme?
    By Jayne O'Donnell, USA TODAY

    LEXINGTON, Ky. — Marie Richardson of Daytona Beach, Fla., has never been as excited about a business opportunity as she is about her new work for Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing. In her first week and a half as an independent sales representative this summer, she earned $800 in bonuses for recruiting four customers who agreed to pay a fee to become salespeople and buy or sell products.

    Kimberly Asper of Missoula, Mont., however, says she sometimes has to feed her family cereal or ramen noodles for dinner since she was laid off from a job and spent thousands trying to build a business through Fortune. She soon realized it was all about "signing people up."

    Richardson was one of several thousand salespeople who gathered here last month for a Fortune conference to learn how to recruit people and sell products including cell phone service and private-label vitamins for the company, which Fortune's top money earner, Ruel Morton, calls "the most lucrative financial opportunity in the history of the country." Asper, meanwhile, was one of the Montanans whose complaints led to a lawsuit filed by the state securities commissioner and settlement that required Fortune to tell current and new representatives that no compensation will be paid for recruitment. Fortune paid $1 million to settle the charges, including $840, 000 to reimburse Montanans, but did not admit wrongdoing.

    Multilevel or "network" marketing pays commissions to salespeople for the products they sell, on products sold by others they recruit, and often bonuses when their teams reach a certain level of sales. The Direct Selling Association, which represents companies that have multilevel compensation plans, estimates there were about 16.1 million of these "direct" salespeople in the U.S. last year, up from 15.1 million in 2008, thanks to high unemployment and the need for many to supplement incomes. Avon, Amway and Mary Kay Cosmetics are among the largest companies in multilevel marketing, but there are hundreds of lesser-known businesses that sell everything from jewelry to cell phone service.

    Critics of Fortune, including the Montana Commissioner of Securities and the plaintiffs in a new lawsuit seeking class-action status, say Fortune is a "pyramid scheme" because salespeople are primarily paid for recruiting, not product sales, and more recent recruits can't earn anything close to what the early entrants do. Fortune has until Nov. 2 to respond to the lawsuit seeking class-action status.

    "Presidential ambassadors" such as Morton average $1, 240, 992 in income a year, yet make up just 0.07% of the company's representatives, according to a financial disclosure Fortune filed as part of its April settlement with Montana. The statement also shows 30% of Fortune representatives make nothing, and 54% of those with earnings average just $93 a month, before costs. More than 99% of those who make money earn less than $31, 524 a year.

    In a written response to questions, Fortune CEO Tom Mills stressed its independent salespeople's "success depends upon and requires successful sales efforts, hard work, leadership and teamwork." There's a big difference in what people make, because some people only work part time, he says.

    To afford big payouts at the upper levels, former Fortune regional sales manager Joseph Isaacs says the company targets desperate unemployed people, Hispanic immigrants and others who are struggling to make ends meet. Joanne McMahon, a national sales manager speaking at a training session USA TODAY attended here, said it is the people who can't afford the fee to join Fortune who need the company the most.

    "I heard testimony of people who had become millionaires in a matter of months, " says Asper, 38, who once earned $100, 000 a year in retail management. "They led us to believe we'd be one of those people."

    The reward for recruitment
    Fortune documents show its sales reps are paid $100 to $480 for recruiting customers who pay fees to become representatives and buy or sell a small number of products. They receive commissions of up to 1% — or less than $1 on a $100-a-month cell phone bill — on products and services, which they are often encouraged to buy for themselves or give away. Former sales managers including Isaacs and Yvonne Day, a plaintiff in the lawsuit seeking class-action status, say their product commission checks were often less than $20, while income from bonuses totaled several thousand dollars. A lawsuit filed by Isaacs alleges 82% of 100, 000 Fortune representatives last year "failed to earn a single residual commission over $20 despite making personal purchases."

    The company says it has about 104, 000 salespeople and has customers in every state, Canada, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom. Mills says because its salespeople are "independent, " they aren't required to notify the company when they have meetings. But there were still recruitment meetings in 12 states including New York, Virginia and Alabama being publicized by Fortune on its website this week.
    Fortune and its independent representatives also regularly promote the turnaround stories of its top earners in videotaped meetings, the conference here, a book written by its president and in interviews in Success From Home magazine. Matt Morse of Arkansas told the magazine his first child had hand-me-downs, but that after he joined Fortune he became debt free, got new things for his second child and started going to a country club twice a week and Disney World three times a year. Anna Chorost of Oklahoma said that since she joined Fortune, she and her husband have flown to California "simply because we wanted a nice glass of wine." Companies that are featured on the cover of Success From Home agree to buy at least $330, 000 worth of issues, according to a description of the prerequisites obtained by USA TODAY.

    Fortune president defends company
    The Federal Trade Commission considers a company a pyramid scheme even if it has products for sale if it's clear during recruitment that "the real way to make money isn't by selling that product but by recruiting other people to pay money for the right to sell that product, " says Monica Vaca, assistant director for the FTC's division of marketing practices.

    The FTC Act also prohibits "deceptive and misleading practices, " which may include claims about what people make that don't make "clear if it's not typical of what everyone who joins is making, " Vaca says.
    In an interview at the conference, Fortune founder and President Paul Orberson defended his company against the charges it is a pyramid scheme: "If it were illegal, I wouldn't be standing here."
    As with laws enforced by the FTC, at least 46 states also ban the payment of money to reward the act of recruiting another participant, says Gerald Nehra, a multilevel marketing defense attorney who headed Amway's legal division from 1982 to 1991.

    Nehra says he advises his clients that "80% or more of money that moves around the enterprise should be directly related to sales of products or services." Nehra would not comment on any particular company.

    Diane Graber, a former executive sales manager from Montana who is a supporter of Fortune, acknowledges that "if you were not recruiting, your business was dying." The checks from product sales were "not good enough to live on, " says Graber, who was a defendant in the Montana lawsuit.

    "All compensation is based on sales, and sales alone, " Mills said in his written response. "There is never any compensation for recruiting, only for the acquisition and retention of customers."

    "Customer acquisition bonuses, " he says, "reward the (independent representatives) for acquiring new customers."

    Qualifying for bonuses
    Fortune only pays these customer-acquisition bonuses to those who bring in people who pay the $99 fee to join and agree to buy or sell some products or services. Once that new representative makes enough sales to get five "customer points, " they are qualified to get bonuses themselves for bringing in others.

    A customer, Nehra says, is a person who "has no expectation of making money and just receives the product or service for the value paid." They don't provide Social Security numbers or taxpayer ID numbers and sign independent contractor agreements, he says.

    Most recurring purchases — such as cell phone service, satellite TV or regular deliveries of vitamins — count for one or two points. A "First Day Packet, " distributed to new Fortune salespeople as recently as last June, says three customer points could be easily obtained by the new salesperson by paying a monthly fee to have a Fortune website and a travel website. The packet noted that the "goal" is to have 10 points with at least two or four points representing sales to another person.
    Mills says the company didn't produce or endorse the packet, but a similar suggestion is made by Fortune presidential ambassador Todd Rowland in a videotaped presentation viewed by USA TODAY and sold by Fortune last year. Rowland noted the Fortune website is the first point and that new recruits could buy nutritional or beauty products or switch their family's cell phone service and TV to satellite service offered by Fortune to earn their points, as his family did.
    Former managers, including Asper, Isaacs and Day, all say they were encouraged to become customers themselves.

    "You could sell the products to others, but nobody ever does that, " says Isaacs, who is being sued by Fortune for trademark infringement and filed a counterclaim calling Fortune an "unlawful pyramid scheme." "In reality, it isn't taught that way. All new managers buy their first three, five or 10 points to immediately qualify their business."
    Kevin Mullens, a Pentecostal preacher and Fortune national sales manager in Crawfordville, Fla., used the Bible in a videotaped presentation last fall to emphasize why the downtrodden need a plan that includes Fortune: "The Scripture says without a vision, people perish."

    Fortune, he said, is "a ministry that can produce whatever it is that you need."

    State officials step in
    Some government officials aren't so sure. What states are doing:
    •Montana Commissioner of Securities Monica Lindeen says she was pitched to join Fortune by her brother. He recruited her mother and other family members before she learned her office was investigating. She called Fortune a "pyramid scheme" when she filed suit against the company in March. Along with prohibiting Fortune from paying people for recruiting and insisting that bonuses only be based on product sales outside the home, Montana's consent agreement requires Fortune to lower its entry fee from $299 at the time to $75 and to give every representative a "disclosure document" that explains how long it takes to earn different levels of income. All of Lindeen's family members have left Fortune.

    •The Texas Attorney General's office sent Fortune a "civil investigative demand" letter on Aug. 26. The letter asked for the names of all state residents enrolled in Fortune, how much they paid to get in and got in return, along with the gross product sales in the state. The letter also asks the names and earnings of the highest-ranking managers of the company, who is below them on their teams and how much comes from direct product sales as opposed to "commissions, bonuses or sales by others." Jerry Strickland, a spokesman for Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, says the office is reviewing Fortune's response, and the "investigation is ongoing."

    •Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway's office is also investigating, according to former Fortune managers Day and Isaacs, who have been interviewed. The office doesn't confirm or deny investigations and wouldn't comment about Fortune. In an interview, however, Conway said it could violate the state's anti-pyramid scheme law if product sales alone couldn't "sustain the people at the lower end of the chain." And it could be considered an "unconscionable act" under the state's consumer protection law to not disclose how unlikely it is for new salespeople to make anything close to what more senior managers do.

    •North Dakota Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem issued a cease-and-desist order last December against Fortune for violations of several state laws. Fortune agreed to pay a $12, 500 fine and to voluntarily comply with state laws. But Stenehjem said the state's consumer protection division would continue to investigate whether Fortune violates the state's anti-pyramid, consumer fraud and home-solicitation laws.

    •North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper's office has received "a number of complaints" about Fortune, and the consumer protection division launched an investigation, according to spokeswoman Noelle Talley.

    •At least four other states — Missouri, South Carolina, Illinois and Florida — have followed up on complaints from disgruntled former Fortune representatives.

    Non-English speakers vulnerable
    Some say Fortune goes too far in targeting vulnerable Hispanics who aren't fluent in English. Ilse Bustamante, a printing company executive from Deland, Fla., filed a complaint with her state after a friend tried to strong-arm her into joining Fortune because of her Latin connections. She says Fortune is determined to tap into the growing Hispanic market to fuel its own growth and targets bilingual people like her to lure non-English-speakers.

    "The way they (Fortune) present this info is misleading, and with them not knowing English that well, they're going to fall for it, " Bustamante says.

    Mary Jude Ramirez, whose son-in-law left Fortune because of the high monthly fees, agrees. "These are people who really have an American dream, " Ramirez says. "The Fortune people tell them they only need a great desire to get ahead, and if they spread the word of this program, riches will pour into their lap."

    A central part of the Fortune pitch, as heard at the conference here and explained by several former managers, is that it's easy to recruit other managers because the brands and products it sells are ones almost everyone already needs and uses. But nearly all of the household names, including Travelocity, Citibank, Allstate and Home Depot, that the company listed on its website as recently as this summer are no longer named.

    Currently, Fortune representatives can sell satellite TV through Dish Network. Although it had a large display at the conference, Dish downplayed its relationship with Fortune and told Montana officials that it didn't have a partnership with Fortune, which it called a "third-party independent contractor, " according to the Montana cease-and-desist order against Fortune. Dish didn't reply to a request for comment.

    Fortune representatives can also sell cellphone service for most major carriers through a company called The Wireless Shop, which is owned by Reston, Va.-based Simplexity. Other products include Fortune's private-label vitamin line, True Essentials, private-label skin-care products, online music downloads, roadside assistance and home-security systems.

    Fortune often notes that its commissions are up to 25%, but those who choose that route forfeit the "customer points" necessary to advance in the company and receive bonuses in bringing in other salespeople who are also customers. And the larger commissions are only available on its private-label products.

    Fortune lowers fees after complaints
    Fortune has been changing its national policies, including lowering the entrance fee outside Montana from $299 to $199 to $99 in the last four months — following complaints and legal charges. In a taped conference call with his team members on Sept. 29, Morton said the company would no longer pay recruitment bonuses until managers have 12 people on their teams, which places them at the regional sales manager level. To have 12 people on a team, a person has to recruit three people who recruit three people who get three more people who bring in another three. USA TODAY listened to the call.

    Commissions on products were also increased from 0.25% to either 0.50% or 1%, which would boost residuals from product sales but still make Fortune's product commissions extremely low compared with other companies using multilevel compensation plans. Nehra says even 25% commissions would be low in multilevel marketing, as many companies pay up to 45% commissions because they sell such high-margin products. Kenyon Meyer, the attorney who filed the lawsuit seeking class-action status, says such a small change doesn't change the legality as it's still far more lucrative to recruit. "If you create a system where recruitment is rewarded more than the sale of products, what is a rational person going to do?" says Meyer, whose law firm has represented subsidiaries of Gannett, the parent company of USA TODAY.

    Lou Abbott, an advocate of multilevel marketing and founder of the website MLM-thewholetruth.com, says he believes Fortune is in "a gray area and always has been."

    "For a company to stand legal scrutiny, distributors cannot in any way, shape or form be compensated for recruiting other distributors, " Abbott says. The lawsuit seeking class-action status is asking the court to force Fortune to pay back the money that representatives paid the company and to stop Fortune from operating as an "illegal pyramid scheme."
    Richardson, who has a kettle corn business at a flea market and sells real estate, found the story of a former dishwasher in Mexico who is now a presidential ambassador was compelling at the conference. She's also motivated by the Lexus vehicle Fortune is now making payments on for the person who recruited her. Fortune agrees to make payments on certain luxury vehicles when representatives reach the executive sales manager level — which means they have 90 people on their teams — as long as they remain at that level.

    "That's my goal, " Richardson says.

    Kimberly Asper and her husband were both laid off more than a year ago and lost their home in a foreclosure this summer. She's now working up to 10 hours a week for minimum wage in a coffee shop. She estimates she spent about $5, 000 to join Fortune, buy products, hold meetings and pay for travel to Fortune conferences. "The people in the company who are higher up keep benefiting from people who are struggling to be at the same level, " Asper says.

    When Asper met Orberson at a Canadian conference, however, she says he told her it didn't have to be that way: "He wanted to know why I wasn't on stage, and when was I going to be his next millionaire."

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2010-10-15-multilevelmarketing14_CV_N.htm

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 07, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM named as a company under investigation as part of the Nationwide Joint Investigation between FTC and Attorneys General known as "Operation Empty Promises"

    0 Votes
  • In
    interestingthoughts May 21, 2011

    @JonnieYen

    You cannot be using GE, Dupont and Walmart and associating them with FHTM.

    They have made it clear they do not want to be associated with them.

    http://www.fhtmclassaction.info/An%20URGENT%20Message%20from%20FHTM%20Compliance.pdf

    Here is the link if you don't believe me.

    0 Votes

FHTM SCAM or NOT

No, FHTM does not fit the traditional definition of a pyramid scheme. Real products and services are being sold to consumers through the network of Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing representatives. These products and services include cell phone plans, internet telephone service plans, nutritional supplements and travel discounts.

However, since reps are independent, it is not known at any given time whether or not certain outlandish income claims are being made. Any company with thousands of sales representatives can potentially find itself misrepresented. There are plenty of representatives in this company who are successful.

MLM business models are a legitimate method for the selling and promoting of consumer goods and services. However, when the company is found to be emphasizing recruitment of new distributors over the acquisition of product customers, this is where the legitimate MLM model can morph into a genuine pyramid scheme.

Pyramid schemes are illegal as they focus mainly on fast money that is earned by selling the business opportunity that is, selling the opportunity to recruit others into the business instead of selling the opportunity to sell actual products and services. (see article by Cathy Yeatts)

  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Sep 25, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    A class action lawsuit was filed against Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing (FHTM), its officers, directors, Presidential Ambassadors and all National Sales Managers claiming fraud, pyramid scheme and RICO violations in the Eastern District of the Federal Courts on September 2, 2010

    Defendants listed in the lawsuit include:
    Paul C. Orberson, Jeff Orberson, Thomas A. Mills, David Mills, Billy Stahl, Simon Davies, Ruel Morton, Todd Rowland, Ashley Rowland, Todd & Ashley, Inc., Mike Misenheimer, Steve Jordan, Joel McNinch, Chris Doyle, Ken Brown, Jerry Brown, Bob Decant, Joanne McMahon, Terry Walker, Sandi Walker, Sherri Winter, Trey Knight, Kevin Mullins, Scott Aguilar, Molly Aguilar, Nathan Kirby, Dwayne Brown, Aaron Decker, Susan Frank, Ramiro Armenta, Angelina Armenta, Alexis Adame, Teresa Adame, Darla DiGrandi, Matt Morse, Matt Barrett and Roberto Rivera


    This is an action by plaintiffs on behalf of themselves and those similarly situated to recover damages caused by the defendants' operation of an inherently fraudulent pyramid scheme. The pyramid scheme is fraudulent because it requires the payment by participants of money to defendant Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing, Inc. ("Fortune"), in return for which participants receive (1) the right to sell products and (2) the right to receive in return for recruiting other participants into the program rewards which are unrelated to sale of the product to ultimate users.

    This action is brought on behalf of a national class of persons who serve or have served as independent representatives for Fortune, pursuant to the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1961-1968 ("RICO"), the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act, KRS Chapter 367, and the laws of Kentucky.

    Under the Compensation Plan utilized by Fortune until at least July 1, 2010, IRs are able to earn compensation from two sources: (1) bonuses for recruiting and sponsoring new representatives; and (2) commissions from sales of products and services by themselves and by recruits in their "downline.

    Fortune operates as an illegal pyramid scheme because this compensation plan affords IRs the right to receive in return for recruiting other participants into Fortune rewards which are unrelated to the sale of products or services to ultimate users outside of Fortune. Fortune's compensation plan involves an elaborate set of bonuses which are effectively the only way to earn money in Fortune and which are all tied not to real sales to outside customers, but rather to recruitment of new IRs.

    To perpetuate the fraudulent pyramid scheme described above, Fortune claims to have special relationships with or to be a "partner" of several large major national companies whose products and services Fortune offers. These companies include, but are not limited to, AT&T, Verizon Wireless, Sprint, Dish Networks, General Electric Security ("GE Security"), DuPont and Home Depot. Fortune has used the trademarks of these and other companies in marketing materials and business presentations in order to convince prospective customers that Fortune is a legal business. In reality, Fortune does not have any sort of special relationship with these companies. Fortune is not a "partner" with Dish Networks. Rather it is a third-party independent contractor authorized to sell Dish Networks service. There are numerous other such third-party vendors of Dish Network.

    All of the defendants in this action collectively form an "enterprise" under RICO, 18 U.S.C. § 1962, in that they are a group of individuals and entities associated in fact, although not a legal entity.

    The defendants' promotion of an illegal pyramid scheme is a per se scheme to defraud under the mail and wire fraud statutes; thus, the defendants have committed racketeering acts by promoting an illegal pyramid scheme by using and causing others to use the mail and by transmitting and causing others to transmit, by means of wire in interstate commerce, writing, signs, signals, pictures and sounds, all in furtherance of and for purposes of executing a scheme or artifice to defraud, namely an illegal pyramid scheme.

    1 Votes
  • Lo
    logicalskeptic Dec 06, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Key points to consider: Being sued is not proof of guilt nor is it a conviction. The lawsuit has been filed. Anyone can file a lawsuit for any reason.

    This is a lawsuit SEEKING class action status. That status has not yet been granted.

    It is being pushed by Joe Isaacs who was sued by FHTM for unethical practices and trademark violations.

    Joe has recruited the law firm representing media company Gannett. Gannett has a huge financial incentive to stop FHTM because traditional media can't monetize word of mouth marketing the way FHTM does for its vendors.

    There is at least one glaring falsehood in the lawsuit that alleges that FHTM reps get paid for recruiting. This is not true. No money is paid for recruiting. Bonuses are paid ONLY when reps sell products or services.

    The article uses language that describes FHTM as if the allegations were already proven to be true. This is intentionally misleading and is meant to scare off prospects.

    The intent of a lawsuit of this type can be simply to frighten people regardless of validity or success.
    Things to think about.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Feb 27, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM is no longer authorized to use the DuPont name, logo, or trademark in any way. FHTM should immediately discontinue the use of any materials containing the DuPont logo. Our right to use DuPont’s name, logo and trademark was revoked because FHTM abused the system by creating and distributing unapproved marketing materials that displayed the DuPont logo.

    0 Votes
  • Lo
    logicalskeptic Feb 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Sneaky... you edited the alert to support your complaint against FHTM which is false and misleading. Specifically, "Our right to use DuPont’s name, logo and trademark was revoked because FHTM abused the system by creating and distributing unapproved marketing materials that displayed the DuPont logo." The actual alert that was issued clearly states that is was an independent rep who produced and distributed unapproved information using the DuPont logo in direct violation of FHTM policy. It was NOT FHTM who abused the system but an independent rep who did. FHTM was not to blame in any way for this unfortunate event nor did FHTM lose the right to distribute the products produced by DuPont. So, if you are going to report on the company then get your facts straight and stop being unethical. Your actions only serve to further damage the reliability of this website and cast doubt on all posts entered here.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Feb 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    tHAT IS ###. fhtm USES THE LOGO IN THE BUSINESS PRESENTATIONS PRODUCED TO ENTICE REPS TO JOIN

    2 Votes
  • Lo
    logicalskeptic Feb 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    You edited the alert to be misleading. The actual alert that was issued clearly states that an independent rep created and distributed unapproved material in violation of FHTM policy.

    -1 Votes

FHTM SCAM CHEATERS

Oh you are so wrong! Sponsors switched some info around and it put the people who should have been in my reg business and put them on my managers side so when I had 200 people sign up in two months, yes the stole over $40, 000 from me in pay. Not only do we have the forged documents, we also have them on tape. The company knows about this and choose to do nothing and for this I will fight them to the end. Funny how all of the truths about them are coming out and people are seeing the real criminals who are taking the dreams of hundreds of thousands and crushing them. Had they chosen to do what is right I would have followed them through thick and thin. But when you have witnesses and a tape recording to this, and loving the way it has caused pain and laughing that they got away with it...I have the goods to take them down.
You have no idea how many people have contacted me about people stealing their trainings and other mishandling of things they have experienced. The best thing FHTM could have done was to have made this right and in the end settled with everyone who was cheated, so since they have not they will continue to pay the price.
FHTM IS GOING TO HELL

  • Oe
    OEFWarrior Jun 06, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Wake up and smell the deception! FHTM is collecting millions and disbursing a mere pittance. As to top tier companies aligned with FHTM that’s crap! Validate your information, I went back and carefully listened to the video by Joel McNitch and others talking about FHTM and noticed they are VERY precise in their selection of words and terms. Name recognition is a key point in their presentation. During their scripted presentation they ask if you’ve heard of a company called Home Depot, of course you have, then they go on to say “How would you like to get paid for shopping there?” but they do not say they are partnered with them, (because they are NOT) they talk about their partnership with a company called BSP then they pop up a sign with Home Depot, Macy’s, Best Buy and Chili’s. This is a true representation of BSP rewards, NOT FHTM. But the allure of making a few thousand (or at least that’s what you’re lead to believe) is just too much. Open your eyes, I’m sure you believed you could make tons of money and you've enlisted the help of family and friends to accomplish this. Now you can't go back and tell them you were wrong. This company is NOT here to help you they are here to exploit you!
    MyTelTag
    This is a product only available to Representatives and costs $19.99 a month. So clearly buying this won't make you money as a representative, and in fact will cost you $19.99 a month.
    Peter Lamas has a direct affiliate program paying 20%, that is free to sign up for. So going through FHTM pays you .5%, and signing up for a free affiliate account pays 20%.
    Choice Plans RX
    This is a FHTM company that they pay Ocenture to set up and run for them. When you go to the website, it has copyright FHTM, but when you look who owns the domain name, all contact emails are to ocenture.com email addresses. If you use this product, remember you are actually buying from FHTM, and be sure to check prices you are paying against a site such as drugstore.com. A spot check of the price list shows the drug Pegasys for 180MCG/0.5 for $1, 482.23. It appears to be available from drugstore.com as a 1ml vial for $651.98. If the 0.5 in the ChoicePlanRX price refers to half a ML, then you pay $2, 964.46 for 1ml, while at drugstore.com you can get it for $651.98. I suggest you look at the prices yourself.
    Health Card
    This product is yet another product that FHTM paid Ocenture to run, and Ocenture uses VantageAmerica Solutions, Inc. to run the card discounts. It looks like FHTM paid Ocenture to rebrand their pre packaged product called MedAffordable. so you can work with just one middle man instead of three (FHTM, Ocenture, and VantageAmericaSolutions)
    Travel FHTM
    This is another service where FHTM paid Ocenture to rebrand and rename their existing product called TrotHop, and to set up an affiliate site through Travelocity, to book tickets through an airline. If you buy from TravelFHTM, you are going through three middlemen to reach the airline (FHTM, Ocenture, & Travelocity). Basically this service uses Travelocity, rebranded to look like TravelFHTM, adding on a fee to each ticket. Tickets tend to be $5 – $10 dollars more on TravelFHTM than buying straight from Travelocity, you can test this by checking the price for an identical flight through Travelocity and TravelFHTM. Also, in order to offer this product, the representative must pay $49.99
    Roadside AutoClub
    This is simply a service set up by Ocenture to provide roadside assistance. You can go to http://ocenture.com/PrePackPrograms to look at all the services Ocenture can set up for your organization. It looks like this is what FHTM did.
    Ingrid Home Security
    The link to this service did not work, so I was unable to assess what this service was. If the link is not working, it's safe to say you can't use this service.
    Protect America
    This appears to be a GE security product that FHTM markets, by going through an authorized dealer, greatalarms.com. So you have 2 middle men, (FHTM and greatalarms.com) As of 2.26.10, the FHTM's site had free* sign up options, but the asterisk beside the FREE does not have an explanation. It should include this: * "Standard monitoring agreement required with approved credit. ", FHTM is misleading if they don't show the disclaimer. It is not free.
    FortuneTV.info
    This is a product only available to Fortune Representatives, and so is not a way for FHTM reps to make money.
    EZnet Tools
    This is a Quick Website Creation Company that welcomes Multi Level Marketing Companies as affiliates. If you want to set up a simple website, I suggest you use a reputable company like wordpress.com, who can have you online on your own domain name for $15 a year
    Dish Network
    Anyone can become an affiliate of Dish Network, and be paid $150 per installation, you can become an affiliate at vmc satelliet on the net.. Compare that to 8 cents through FHTM, and the best choice is clear.
    The Wireless Shop
    One of the most talked about services at FHTM is the wireless shop. This is a website that FHTM uses Simplexity to run. You can buy cell phones and cell phone contracts through this service. Simplexity uses linkshare.com to purchase these services. By going through FHTM Wireless Shop you appear to be using three middlemen (FHTM, Simplexity, and Linkshare). Linkshare can be joined for free by going to simplexity's site which can be joined for free by going to Simplexity or Link Share and clicking on "Join Our Wireless Program Today" and create a free affiliate account, and start earning the full commission instead of the .05 cents FHTM gives back to their representatives. With this free account, you can earn affiliate money from many companies, So FHTM does not really have a direct relationship with Verizon and AT&T, contrary to the impression given by the company.
    As I pointed out above the wireless shop is an affiliate membership which pays from $35 to $51 dollars per contract sold. FHTM is then taking this breaking it down into 24 equal payment and calling it a 1/4 percent. When in fact they are only paying out .05 cents of what you earned, which totals $1.20 which leaves $49.80 in FHTM’s pocket. Look at their schedule of payments in their Policies and Procedures pamphlet page 46.
    Looking at the attached chart you can see the two columns highlighted are “The Wireless Shop” and “Dish Network” both of which the dolar amount listed is the payout per contract, NOT 1/4 percent! So they are paying 5 cents for your wireless and 8 cents for Dish Network. Would it surprise you to know that Dish network pays $150 per contract.

    By level 8; FHTM makes $2, 952, 00 paying out $984, 100 In so called residuals they make approximately $1, 238, 489 don’t forget to take into account annual dues which total $1, 312, 200 and $2, 952, 000 annually and that’s for the use of their website of which you make absolutely nothing. How many times over (since 2001) has FHTM made it to level 8?
    No legally this is not against the law but no matter how you look at it, THIS IS A SCAM!

    0 Votes
  • FHTM - Scam Jun 21, 2010

    Whistleblower fights back after frivolous suit by FHTM for exposing their ILLEGAL Pyramid Scheme

    Lexington, Kentucky - June 16, 2010 - In light of all of the recent investments scams including the infamous Bernie Maddoff, whistleblowers and those with morals fear that the frauds they expose will result in unjust lawsuits filed against them by the companies they complain about. One such situation was that of the lawsuit filed by Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing against Fortune Social LLC and Joseph Isaacs in May 2010.

    Joseph Isaacs and Fortune Social, LLC (collectively “Isaacs”) deny each and every claim brought by Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing, Inc. (“FHTM”) in a filing made today with the American Arbitration Association, who is overseeing this case. In addition, Isaacs fights back and asserts his own counterclaim for relief against FHTM, Paul C. Orberson (individually and in his capacity as President of FHTM), Jeff Orberson (individually and in his capacity as Chief Operating Officer of FHTM), and Thomas A. Mills (individually and in his capacity as Vice-President and Chief Executive Officer of FHTM) (collectively “FHTM”). Isaacs counterclaim claim Breach of Fiduciary Duty, Breach of Contract, Common Law Fraud, Unfair & Deceptive Business Practices, Failure to Register Securities, Fraudulent Practices Regarding the Sale of Securities, Civil Racketeering Conspiracy (violation of the Federal RICO statutes) and Defamation.

    FHTM operates an unlawful product-based endless recruiting pyramid scheme that relies on untrue and misleading representations and unlawful, unfair, and fraudulent business practices. While FHTM purports to be in the business of selling name-brand services like wireless, satellite television, home security, vitamins, nutritional products and travel services, its true business is using consumers to generate fee income for representing non-existent partnerships, major sports figures, and prominent businessmen. To entice consumers to participate, FHTM makes untrue or misleading claims regarding its relationship with Fortune 100 companies like Verizon Wireless, GE Security, Dish Networks and Travelocity to create the illusion that consumers can become millionaires in three to five years.

    FHTM’s growth exploded when it began to lure consumers disenchanted with traditional jobs and the recession that began in 2007 to inspirational and high-pressure business opportunity seminars touting an innovative business model that promises huge financial rewards through multi-level network marketing. FHTM erring presenters claim to have proprietary tools, special relationships, and other support that allow consumers to grow their own business by partnering with FHTM’s “companies”.

    It would not be long before Isaacs (and the world) made several troubling discoveries about FHTM’s business plan and practices that doused his enthusiasm: (1) Paul Orberson had not made any special arrangements with the companies mentioned at the business opportunity/presentation seminar or in the company produced videos; (2) the only way to earn a significant income and be promoted up the ranks was to recruit additional IRs; (3) FHTM had not received regulatory approval for its pyramiding scheme in every state; (4) only a handful of IRs had earned anywhere near the residuals projected; (5) the prominent businessmen, politicians, former attorney generals and sports figures to whom FHTM constantly alluded were in fact IRs actively promoting their own FHTM business; and (6) a growing number of state attorneys general had already begun investigating FHTM in response to numerous complaints.

    It turns out that FHTM’s ‘innovative’ marketing plan is nothing more than a face lift to an age-old scheme. According to the FTC’s Consumer Protection Bureau:

    Pyramid schemes now come in so many forms that they may be difficult to recognize immediately. However, they all share one overriding characteristic. They promise consumers or investors large profits based primarily on recruiting others to join their program, not based on profits from any real investment or real sale of goods to the public. Some schemes may purport to sell a product, but they often simply use the product to hide their pyramid structure. There are two tell-tale signs that a product is simply being used to disguise a pyramid scheme: inventory loading and a lack of retail sales. Inventory loading occurs when a company's incentive program forces recruits to buy more products than they could ever sell, often at inflated prices. If this occurs throughout the company's distribution system, the people at the top of the pyramid reap substantial profits, even though little or no product moves to market. The people at the bottom make excessive payments for inventory that simply accumulates in their basements. A lack of retail sales is also a red flag that a pyramid exists. Many pyramid schemes will claim that their product is selling like hot cakes. However, on closer examination, the sales occur only between people inside the pyramid structure or to new recruits joining the structure, not to consumers out in the general public.

    Nonetheless, the truth is catching up with FHTM. On December 10, 2009, The North Dakota Attorney General's Office filed a Cease and Desist Order for violation of the Consumer Fraud Law, the Transient Merchant Law, the Home Solicitation Sales Law, and the North Dakota Pyramid Schemes Act. On January 19, 2010, FHTM entered into a Assurance of Voluntary Compliance with the North Dakota Attorney General's Office. On March 16, 2010, the Montana State Auditor's Office filed a Temporary Cease and Desist Order against FHTM, Paul C. Orberson, Thomas A. Mills, and Dianne Graber (a Montana IR). According to the Montana State Auditor's Office, FHTM has engaged in acts or practices constituting violations of the Securities Act of Montana, Montana Code ANN.30-10-101 et seq. On April 22, 2010, FHTM agreed to pay nearly $1 million and to change its business practices to resolve the charge that it is operating a pyramid promotional scheme.

    With each passing day, more states are jumping on FHTM’s bandwagon. The alarming rise in consumer complaints and governmental sanctions has prompted the Better Business Bureau of Central and Eastern Kentucky to downgrade FHTM’s rating from “B-” to “F”. At the same time, a proliferation of online bulletin boards and blogs, such as www.complaintsboard.com and www.scams.com criticize FHTM’s pyramid scheme confirms that Isaacs’ experience is not unique. Will those operations be the next target of Fortune’s high price legal team?

    0 Votes
  • Cs
    csampson Aug 23, 2010

    If you go to the BBB Web site, you will also see how many conflicts FHTM has been able to resolve. FHTM reps clearly make an effort to resolve differences. There are alot more complaints on this Web site about FHTM than listed in the BBB web site because the BBB only takes legit claims. The following information came from the BBB Web site:

    Complaints Concerned:
    Selling Practices (19 complaints)
    10 Resolved
    3 Delayed Resolution
    5 Company made every reasonable effort to resolve
    1 The parties could not provide sufficient information to support their positions nor agreeable to make reasonable efforts toward resolving the issue of the dispute

    Advertising Issues (3 complaints)
    1 Resolved
    2 Company made every reasonable effort to resolve

    Service Issues (4 complaints)
    2 Resolved
    2 Company made every reasonable effort to resolve

    Credit or Billing Disputes (4 complaints)
    4 Resolved

    Delivery Issues (1 complaints)
    1 Resolved

    Refund Practices (17 complaints)
    15 Resolved
    1 Delayed Resolution
    1 Company made every reasonable effort to resolve

    Product Quality (1 complaints)
    1 Resolved

    Contract Disputes (2 complaints)
    1 Resolved
    1 Company made every reasonable effort to resolve

    Guarantee or Warranty Issues (2 complaints)
    2 Resolved

    0 Votes
  • Oe
    OEFWarrior Aug 28, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    to: csampson
    Don't fabricate crap like this the BBB does not have this on their web site you are making this up! FHTM is a scam!

    0 Votes
  • Yv
    yvonne day Sep 26, 2010

    BREAKING NEWS!!!
    Fortune caught in lie that they were debt free!
    Everyone has been lied tooo! FHTM used the entire companies assets as collateral and put all reps into a bad position to be the perpetuators of the lie!
    www.fhtmclassaction.info
    to see all of the court documents

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM makes it onto the FTC list of rip-offs. Looks like this company is about to implode

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at ftc.gov/bizopps or youtube.com/FTCvideos.

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/73082559/FHTM-named-in-FTC-investigation-of-illegal-companies

    www.fhtmclassaction.info for all of the details

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe May 09, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Courtesy of David at Corporate Frauds watch:

    The owners of this scam continue to take advantage of 1000’s of new victims weekly by convincing them into joining as they reap the benefits of a purported $500Million dollar nationwide criminal enterprise. 2010 started off with the Attorney General of North Dakota issuing a cease and desist for operating a business in that state without the proper licensing. That was followed by the Montana Securities Commissioner, Monica Lindeen also shutting them down, but this time, it was for operating as an illegal endless recruiting pyramid scheme.

    The company was forced to change their business practices (in an attempt to make their business appear to be legal. Can you do that if you were already legal or is that an oxymoron), charge only $75.00 entrance fee (from the then current $299.00) to new Montanans who wished to explore the American Dream through FHTM and refund almost $1, 000, 000 to the good folks of that state who made no money and wanted a refund of monies paid.

    FHTM was also forced to produce (one time only) an income disclosure statement (“IDS”) which according to industry expert, Robert FitzPatrick who is the President of Pyramid Scheme Alert, is so skewed that it isn’t worth the paper it is written on because the figures do not include the almost 30% who did not make even a dime in this business opportunity. Looking at the numbers produced by FHTM itself, over 90% fail.

    In talking to FHTM reps, they insist on telling the story that every business is a Pyramid and so is the government. What they fail to differentiate is what is a legal and an illegal pyramid scheme. They go on to explain that 95% of all businesses in America fail and the team they have an opportunity to build in FHTM will produce a lifetime of residual income. FHTM claims that building the Fortune opportunity is a willable, trustable and saleable enterprise, but that is false. They have coined the phrase, “Loyal Customer”. In fact, the reality is that when reps drop out of this business (and 90% or better will do so within 6 months) all of those “loyal customers” are gone along with the residual income. Most sales of products and services are to the IR’s that have paid for the right to be part of this business opportunity.

    Existing IR’s saw multiple compensation changes that were sold to them as a message from God and as “another pay raise” yet it was merely a way to screw more at the bottom of this pyramid and enrich those that were hand-picked by the self proclaimed King of MLM, Paul Orberson.
    In fact there were more than a half dozen compensation changes that occurred in 2010 which somehow parallels the ½ dozen state Attorneys General (IL, TX, SC, NC, CA, KY, ND and MT) that began active investigations into this alleged pyramid scheme. FHTM had an “F” rating with the KY BBB until November/December 2010, when top leaders in the organization posted bulletins asking for their IR’s to report FHTM as a model company which assisted in raising the current rating to a “C”. What a sham that system is. Self rating goes against the grain of having the BBB in the first place.

    Like the bosses, and reality-inverting propagandists, of the 'Amway' mob, the bosses, and reality-inverting propagandists, of the 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' mob have steadfastly pretended that: Their direct selling company is perfectly lawful and is associated with all manner of trusted household-names in the USA. They cannot be held responsible if some rogue 'Independent FHTM Business Owners' do not obey the company's own rules which oblige them regularly to sell significant quantities of good-value products, and services, to the public for a profit.

    At the same time, numerous dissidents, testify that the 'FHTM' plan for financial freedom is, in point of fact, a dissimulated closed-market swindle, in which unlawful internal payments (in exchange for effectively-unsalable wampum) have been arbitrarily defined as lawful external 'sales.' In this way, tens of thousands of 'FHTM' adherents continue to be deceived into handing over regular cash-payments to a counterfeit 'direct selling company' controlled by a little gang of sanctimonious racketeers, on the pretext that anyone can retire from work by being their own loyal 'FHTM ' customer and by recruiting their friends and relations to be their own loyal customers, etc. ad infinitum.
    Fortune Hi-Tech has lied about everything in their business presentations since day one including statements about being debt-free, its D&B rating and its business relationships/partnerships with real fortune 100 companies to cover up their illegal ways and to produce the aura that they are some way legal because of these affiliations (Legal by Association). Since 2010 major companies like GE, DuPont, AT&T, Verizon Wireless, Travelocity, Home Depot and Peter Lamas have either run from these relationships or claimed they never existed in the first place including the their demand that FHTM discontinue the unauthorized use of their coveted logos, trademarks and names in presentations and printed materials. Fortune thought it was ok to use the logos of major international enterprises to enhance their own image in order to appear as if they were legal when in fact their entire enterprise is built on misrepresentations. They attempted to tie themselves to Fortune Magazine until ex-representatives revealed the truth, henceforth the recent (end of 2010) disclaimer on the bottom of the FHTM corporate website that now states “FHTM is not sponsored by, endorsed by, affiliated with, or otherwise associated with, Time Inc. or Fortune Magazine. For years this company has used the names of famous people to provide evidence of legitimacy, all which were lies http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DyGaQfDP--c&feature=related
    The nightmare for representatives deepened as FHTM was about to hold its national convention in Lexington, Kentucky in September 2010. On the eve of the convention USA Today appeared there to interview IR’s and attend its presentations. It was the same day that Fortune, its officers and 40 top distributors were served with its first of two class action lawsuits claiming mail and wire fraud, RICO violations, pyramid scheme and money laundering.

    The FHTM outside legal team got an early Christmas present with the filing of the 2nd class-action lawsuit in the Southern District of California on December 22, 2010. This lawsuit mirrors, in many ways, the one originally filed in Kentucky in early September with the addition of multiple violations of California consumer protection laws. The California judge recently sent that case to combine with the Kentucky one.

    FHTM has only succeeded in recent years because of the recession and the fact that its top reps in 2004 brought their teams from the defunct Excel Communications (Another MLM that operated in the gray area of the law until it went bankrupt). They were hand-picked by Paul Orberson to be the top reps in FHTM, paid to bring their teams, given large cash bonuses and a back door deal which included a piece of the pie (equity). They are referred to as the “Fab 6” by Paul Orberson. This enterprise will always remain private to hide these side deals and the money made by its founders.

    How can representatives in 2011 continue to tout this as the best marketing plan and business opportunity ever when the founders have been caught in so many lies, changed the compensation plan to further enrich those at the top, have such a huge 95%+ failure rate, are being sued in Federal court by ex-reps as well as ex-vendors and have multiple states investigating their illegal ways?

    They buy magazine covers, give to charity and self published their own autobiography in an effort to prove legitimacy. Some reps even claim that they are approved to do business in all 50 states. That is far from the truth as no State ever approves or disapproves the business plan of any business.

    In 2010 Fortune made a decision to solicit the Latino markets throughout the USA and recruit by promising green cards. They don’t care whether the Latino immigrants are legal or not. Anyone can join FHTM if they pay the fees. If you are an illegal immigrant, an unemployed truck driver or just a fool – this business is for you. If you don’t mind operating an enterprise that never can be willed, sold or profitable - this business is for you. If you don’t mind screwing your friends and family to get into a business with you that you know they will lose money in – this business is for you. If you don’t mind buying or selling overpriced goods and services – this business is for you. If you have the ability to tell folks this is your destiny per God’s word – this business is for you. If you are a great liar – this business is for you.
    Most of the revenues created by FHTM reps are made by recruiting others into this Ponzi scheme and not from the residual income as they claim. 80% or better sales are to the reps themselves so they can qualify their business in order to get paid bonuses for bringing in others. This violates the FTC rules and the laws in almost 50 states.

    In 2011 FHTM was added to the joint investigation by the FTC and individual state AG’s “Operation Empty Promises”. It was recently discovered that many representatives at the Executive and National level are pocking huge sums of cash from presentations and meeting and skirting their obligations to the IRS. This is not only promoted by but is also endorsed by Paul Orberson – the self proclaimed highest paid network marketer of all times.

    0 Votes

FHTM Taking peoples money

My complaints is about FHTM. I quit this company today as I did the math and figured out that its simply three people putting in money to pay one person. If 3 people sign up at 300 each and the manager gets 100 what happens to the other 200 per person. On a line of nine people thats 1800 times how many lines deep. And if they are paying out $400 bonus checks when you reach the higher level and people are still only paying 300 where do they get the other 100. It has to be coming from somewhere. I urge everyone to sit down and look at how their pay structure is set out and do the math yourself. And what about these supposedly great products and services. Most if not all of them are so overpriced its ridiculous. AMA in Alberta is about $80 per year. Theres is 180.00
per year. Even with a supposed rebate you are paying more than if you went somewhere else. By the way I contacted Peter Lamas and found out they are no longer affiliated with FHTM. My complaints about this company just continue to grow. What kind of company recruits people to sign up people so they dont have to do anything. They talk in their presentation about how awful it is to have a JOB yet I see all these people running around me going to meetings, bringing people into their homes doing presentations. It looks like a lot of work for something thats supposed to give you all this "freedom". I hope if enough people talk about the stupidity of this business we can shut it down. If anyone has a response let me know.

  • Oe
    OEFWarrior Jun 06, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Wake up and smell the deception! FHTM is collecting millions and disbursing a mere pittance. As to top tier companies aligned with FHTM that’s crap! Validate your information, I went back and carefully listened to the video by Joel McNitch and others talking about FHTM and noticed they are VERY precise in their selection of words and terms. Name recognition is a key point in their presentation. During their scripted presentation they ask if you’ve heard of a company called Home Depot, of course you have, then they go on to say “How would you like to get paid for shopping there?” but they do not say they are partnered with them, (because they are NOT) they talk about their partnership with a company called BSP then they pop up a sign with Home Depot, Macy’s, Best Buy and Chili’s. This is a true representation of BSP rewards, NOT FHTM. But the allure of making a few thousand (or at least that’s what you’re lead to believe) is just too much. Open your eyes, I’m sure you believed you could make tons of money and you've enlisted the help of family and friends to accomplish this. Now you can't go back and tell them you were wrong. This company is NOT here to help you they are here to exploit you!
    MyTelTag
    This is a product only available to Representatives and costs $19.99 a month. So clearly buying this won't make you money as a representative, and in fact will cost you $19.99 a month.
    Peter Lamas has a direct affiliate program paying 20%, that is free to sign up for. So going through FHTM pays you .5%, and signing up for a free affiliate account pays 20%.
    Choice Plans RX
    This is a FHTM company that they pay Ocenture to set up and run for them. When you go to the website, it has copyright FHTM, but when you look who owns the domain name, all contact emails are to ocenture.com email addresses. If you use this product, remember you are actually buying from FHTM, and be sure to check prices you are paying against a site such as drugstore.com. A spot check of the price list shows the drug Pegasys for 180MCG/0.5 for $1, 482.23. It appears to be available from drugstore.com as a 1ml vial for $651.98. If the 0.5 in the ChoicePlanRX price refers to half a ML, then you pay $2, 964.46 for 1ml, while at drugstore.com you can get it for $651.98. I suggest you look at the prices yourself.
    Health Card
    This product is yet another product that FHTM paid Ocenture to run, and Ocenture uses VantageAmerica Solutions, Inc. to run the card discounts. It looks like FHTM paid Ocenture to rebrand their pre packaged product called MedAffordable. so you can work with just one middle man instead of three (FHTM, Ocenture, and VantageAmericaSolutions)
    Travel FHTM
    This is another service where FHTM paid Ocenture to rebrand and rename their existing product called TrotHop, and to set up an affiliate site through Travelocity, to book tickets through an airline. If you buy from TravelFHTM, you are going through three middlemen to reach the airline (FHTM, Ocenture, & Travelocity). Basically this service uses Travelocity, rebranded to look like TravelFHTM, adding on a fee to each ticket. Tickets tend to be $5 – $10 dollars more on TravelFHTM than buying straight from Travelocity, you can test this by checking the price for an identical flight through Travelocity and TravelFHTM. Also, in order to offer this product, the representative must pay $49.99
    Roadside AutoClub
    This is simply a service set up by Ocenture to provide roadside assistance. You can go to http://ocenture.com/PrePackPrograms to look at all the services Ocenture can set up for your organization. It looks like this is what FHTM did.
    Ingrid Home Security
    The link to this service did not work, so I was unable to assess what this service was. If the link is not working, it's safe to say you can't use this service.
    Protect America
    This appears to be a GE security product that FHTM markets, by going through an authorized dealer, greatalarms.com. So you have 2 middle men, (FHTM and greatalarms.com) As of 2.26.10, the FHTM's site had free* sign up options, but the asterisk beside the FREE does not have an explanation. It should include this: * "Standard monitoring agreement required with approved credit. ", FHTM is misleading if they don't show the disclaimer. It is not free.
    FortuneTV.info
    This is a product only available to Fortune Representatives, and so is not a way for FHTM reps to make money.
    EZnet Tools
    This is a Quick Website Creation Company that welcomes Multi Level Marketing Companies as affiliates. If you want to set up a simple website, I suggest you use a reputable company like wordpress.com, who can have you online on your own domain name for $15 a year
    Dish Network
    Anyone can become an affiliate of Dish Network, and be paid $150 per installation, you can become an affiliate at vmc satelliet on the net.. Compare that to 8 cents through FHTM, and the best choice is clear.
    The Wireless Shop
    One of the most talked about services at FHTM is the wireless shop. This is a website that FHTM uses Simplexity to run. You can buy cell phones and cell phone contracts through this service. Simplexity uses linkshare.com to purchase these services. By going through FHTM Wireless Shop you appear to be using three middlemen (FHTM, Simplexity, and Linkshare). Linkshare can be joined for free by going to simplexity's site which can be joined for free by going to Simplexity or Link Share and clicking on "Join Our Wireless Program Today" and create a free affiliate account, and start earning the full commission instead of the .05 cents FHTM gives back to their representatives. With this free account, you can earn affiliate money from many companies, So FHTM does not really have a direct relationship with Verizon and AT&T, contrary to the impression given by the company.
    As I pointed out above the wireless shop is an affiliate membership which pays from $35 to $51 dollars per contract sold. FHTM is then taking this breaking it down into 24 equal payment and calling it a 1/4 percent. When in fact they are only paying out .05 cents of what you earned, which totals $1.20 which leaves $49.80 in FHTM’s pocket. Look at their schedule of payments in their Policies and Procedures pamphlet page 46.
    Looking at the attached chart you can see the two columns highlighted are “The Wireless Shop” and “Dish Network” both of which the dolar amount listed is the payout per contract, NOT 1/4 percent! So they are paying 5 cents for your wireless and 8 cents for Dish Network. Would it surprise you to know that Dish network pays $150 per contract.

    By level 8; FHTM makes $2, 952, 00 paying out $984, 100 In so called residuals they make approximately $1, 238, 489 don’t forget to take into account annual dues which total $1, 312, 200 and $2, 952, 000 annually and that’s for the use of their website of which you make absolutely nothing. How many times over (since 2001) has FHTM made it to level 8?
    No legally this is not against the law but no matter how you look at it, THIS IS A SCAM!

    1 Votes
  • Fo
    fortunate1 Jun 29, 2010

    you people are bitter because you didnt put the effort into making your opportunity successful...i defy you to show me another company where your investment is so low and your earnings potential is UNLIMITED! FHTM IS A WONDERFUL COMPANY AND THERE IS COMPLETE DISCLOSURE IF YOU WILL GO TO THEIR WEBSITE AND READ! don't just try to ruin someone elses dream!

    -1 Votes
  • Oe
    OEFWarrior Jul 04, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Read what I have written. Which part of this is not clear. Yes, you can make a lot of money but at what cost? Who is actually benefitting? I'll bet Bernie Maddof made similar claims!

    0 Votes
  • FHTM - Scam Jul 17, 2010

    by Adam Walser
    WHAS11.com

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (WHAS11) -- A Kentucky-based company has been the target of legal actions by two different states. When we first told you about Fortune Hi Tech Marketing in May, the company had just agreed to a settlement with Montana which required it to pay a fine of nearly a million dollars and post its average income statements.

    Fortune reps recruit in restaurants, churches and auditoriums nationwide. They bring in thousands of new members every year, partly by preaching the gospel of prosperity. "You're gonna get paid $100, 000 a year for doing exactly what you do today, ” said one representative in his You Tube recruiting video. “There are quite a few people that stand up in front of the room and talk about how much they're making. One of them posted online he is making $400, 000 a month, ” said a former representative from Texas.


    The Lexington-based company's own top reps have said that Fortune has 200, 000 representatives with annual sales of $500 million. Fortune claims success from representing products from well known companies. “Everybody comes into our business the exact same way, has the exact same opportunities, ” said FHTM CEO Tom Mills.

    However, some former members say it's not sales but recruitment that matters, and only the top recruiters earn big bucks. “Maybe you've got 200 people in Fortune that are from the Executive level up nationally that are making any sizable amount of money, and the rest are all going broke, ” said former FHTM representative Joe Isaacs.


    Montana investigators say most of the state's 3, 000 Fortune reps paid hundreds of dollars to join, but made little or no money. The state called fortune a "pyramid promotional scheme" and ordered the company to make annual income statements available. Fortune agreed to post them in order to continue operating in Montana.

    It wasn't easy for us to find the financial disclosure statement, but we finally did after navigating the website for a while. We went under “opportunity”, then clicked on “rewards, ” then we had to scroll down past the photographs of Fortune members swimming with the dolphins and a family picking up the new Lexis in order to find a tiny link at the bottom of the page. The information inside speaks volumes about Fortune's compensation.

    In the fine print, it says 71 percent of reps are actually paid. 28 percent earn zero. As for how the rest would look on a graph, “It would certainly have a pyramid shape to it, ” said Charlie Mattingly, CEO of the Louisville Better Business Bureau. Nearly 95 percent of reps earn less than $3, 000 a year. Another four percent earn between $3, 000 and-$30, 000. That means less than half of one percent of Fortune reps average more than that.

    “What these numbers show is that relatively few people are making substantial amounts of money. 95 percent of the participants are making very little money, ” said Mattingly.


    Fortune's marketing manager Laura McDonald said in a statement "Our goal with this document is to make sure that prospective FHTM Independent Representatives realize that they will need to work hard to earn an income and success is not guaranteed."

    You can click here to see FHTM annual income statements.

    0 Votes
  • Yv
    yvonne day Jul 19, 2010

    If you have been cheated by Fortune or feel that FORTUNE has mislead you into thinking that they had contracts with all of these companies or any other issues, then please email us at cheatedbyfortune at yahoo.com
    This is not to recruit you to anything else.

    0 Votes
  • Le
    Leslie Koolidgedalm Aug 05, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM operates an unlawful product-based endless recruiting pyramid scheme that relies on untrue and misleading representations and unlawful, unfair, and fraudulent business practices. While FHTM purports to be in the business of selling name-brand services like wireless, satellite television, home security, vitamins, nutritional products and travel services, its true business is using consumers to generate fee income for representing non-existent partnerships, major sports figures, and prominent businessmen. To entice consumers to participate, FHTM makes untrue or misleading claims regarding its relationship with Fortune 100 companies like Verizon Wireless, GE Security, Dish Networks and Travelocity to create the illusion that consumers can become millionaires in three to five years.

    FHTM’s growth exploded when it began to lure consumers disenchanted with traditional jobs and the recession that began in 2007 to inspirational and high-pressure business opportunity seminars touting an innovative business model that promises huge financial rewards through multi-level network marketing. FHTM erring presenters claim to have proprietary tools, special relationships, and other support that allow consumers to grow their own business by partnering with FHTM’s “companies”.

    It would not be long before Isaacs (and the world) made several troubling discoveries about FHTM’s business plan and practices that doused his enthusiasm: (1) Paul Orberson had not made any special arrangements with the companies mentioned at the business opportunity/presentation seminar or in the company produced videos; (2) the only way to earn a significant income and be promoted up the ranks was to recruit additional IRs; (3) FHTM had not received regulatory approval for its pyramiding scheme in every state; (4) only a handful of IRs had earned anywhere near the residuals projected; (5) the prominent businessmen, politicians, former attorney generals and sports figures to whom FHTM constantly alluded were in fact IRs actively promoting their own FHTM business; and (6) a growing number of state attorneys general had already begun investigating FHTM in response to numerous complaints.

    It turns out that FHTM’s ‘innovative’ marketing plan is nothing more than a face lift to an age-old scheme. According to the FTC’s Consumer Protection Bureau:

    Pyramid schemes now come in so many forms that they may be difficult to recognize immediately. However, they all share one overriding characteristic. They promise consumers or investors large profits based primarily on recruiting others to join their program, not based on profits from any real investment or real sale of goods to the public. Some schemes may purport to sell a product, but they often simply use the product to hide their pyramid structure. There are two tell-tale signs that a product is simply being used to disguise a pyramid scheme: inventory loading and a lack of retail sales. Inventory loading occurs when a company's incentive program forces recruits to buy more products than they could ever sell, often at inflated prices. If this occurs throughout the company's distribution system, the people at the top of the pyramid reap substantial profits, even though little or no product moves to market. The people at the bottom make excessive payments for inventory that simply accumulates in their basements. A lack of retail sales is also a red flag that a pyramid exists. Many pyramid schemes will claim that their product is selling like hot cakes. However, on closer examination, the sales occur only between people inside the pyramid structure or to new recruits joining the structure, not to consumers out in the general public.

    Nonetheless, the truth is catching up with FHTM. On December 10, 2009, The North Dakota Attorney General's Office filed a Cease and Desist Order for violation of the Consumer Fraud Law, the Transient Merchant Law, the Home Solicitation Sales Law, and the North Dakota Pyramid Schemes Act. On January 19, 2010, FHTM entered into a Assurance of Voluntary Compliance with the North Dakota Attorney General's Office. On March 16, 2010, the Montana State Auditor's Office filed a Temporary Cease and Desist Order against FHTM, Paul C. Orberson, Thomas A. Mills, and Dianne Graber (a Montana IR). According to the Montana State Auditor's Office, FHTM has engaged in acts or practices constituting violations of the Securities Act of Montana, Montana Code ANN.30-10-101 et seq. On April 22, 2010, FHTM agreed to pay nearly $1 million and to change its business practices to resolve the charge that it is operating a pyramid promotional scheme.

    With each passing day, more states are jumping on FHTM’s bandwagon. The alarming rise in consumer complaints and governmental sanctions has prompted the Better Business Bureau of Central and Eastern Kentucky to downgrade FHTM’s rating from “B-” to “F”. At the same time, a proliferation of online bulletin boards and blogs, such as www.complaintsboard.com and www.scams.com criticize FHTM’s pyramid scheme confirms that Isaacs’ experience is not unique. Will those operations be the next target of Fortune’s high price legal team?

    http://www.sao.mt.gov/legal/securities/S10_HITECH Cease and Desist.pdf

    http://www.whas11.com/news/business/I-Team-Inivestigation-Fortune-Hi-Tech-Marketing-94266814.html

    http://www.whas11.com/community/I-Team-Investigation-Fortune-Hi-Tech-Marketing-94273719.html

    Dec 10, 2009
    North Dakota Attorney General issues a Cease and Desist against Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing for several violations
    http://www.ag.state.nd.us/documents/FortuneCeaseandDesist.pdf

    http://www.ag.state.nd.us/NewsReleases/2009/12-11-09.pdf

    March 4th, 2010
    Montana State Auditor issues a Cease and Desist against Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing after receiving numerous complaints
    http://www.sao.mt.gov/legal/securities/S10_HITECH Cease and Desist.pdf
    KFBB News video
    http://www.kfbb.com/news/local/87709867.html?video=YHI&t=a

    March 7, 2010
    A thin line between legal and illegal in multi-level marketing
    http://www.kentucky.com/2010/03/07/1171075/a-thin-line-between-legal-and.html

    March 10, 2010
    Peter Lamas Pulls out of FHTM in the U.S.
    http://gravittefhtm.info/wordpress/?p=234

    March 17, 2010
    Kentucky Lexington Herald-Leader writes “Montana says Lexington Company is a pyramid scheme, Fortune Marketing company Banned”
    http://www.kentucky.com/2010/03/17/1184218/montana-says-lexington-company.html

    March 26, 2010
    Better Business Bureau News Center
    http://spokane.bbb.org/article/fortune-hi-tech-marketing-of-ky-holding-meetings-in-region-recruiting-in-wa-state-18461

    March 27, 2010
    Washington KNDO News aired “Better Business Bureau warns about possible pyramid scheme”
    http://www.kndo.com/Global/story.asp?S=12214040

    April 22nd, 2010
    FHTM agrees to pay nearly $1 million to settle allegations that FHTM was operating a pyramid promotional scheme in Montana.
    http://www.sao.mt.gov/news/20100422HiTech.html

    May 18th, 2010
    San Antonio, Texas Ken5 news airs false claims about FHTM
    http://www.kens5.com/news/local/Shady-network-marketing-company-comes-to-San-Antonio-area-94208419.html

    May 19th & 20th, 2010
    I-Team Investigation in Louisville, KY, FHTM’s home state, did a 2 part investigation into FHTM. Supported by supportive facts
    http://www.whas11.com/news/business/I-Team-Inivestigation-Fortune-Hi-Tech-Marketing-94266814.html

    May 27th, 2010
    Charlotte, NC WCNC News exposes high profile people in FHTM found to be untrue
    http://www.wcnc.com/home/Pyramid-scheme-recruits-high-profile-sales-reps-94971214.html

    May 27th, 2010
    Charlotte, NC – Charlotte, Observer
    'Pyramid scheme' recruits high profile sales reps
    http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/05/27/1462263/pyramid-scheme-recruits-high-profile.html

    July 15, 2010
    WCNC News Charlotte, NC I-Team Investigation exposes FHTM’s earnings
    http://www.wcnc.com/home/IN-FHTM-PYRAMID-SCHEME-FEW-EARN-MUCH-MONEY---98543069.html

    Lexington, KY BBB has given FHTM the lowest rating for a company an F for most of the year
    http://www.lexington.bbb.org/commonreport.html?compid=14004419

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM makes it onto the FTC list of rip-offs. Looks like this company is about to implode

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at ftc.gov/bizopps or youtube.com/FTCvideos.

    http://www.docstoc.com/docs/73082559/FHTM-named-in-FTC-investigation-of-illegal-companies

    www.fhtmclassaction.info for all of the details

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe May 13, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    No dumb fu*k, but the FTC does in America. Who ever said anything about Canada?

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe May 13, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    What an ignorant fool

    -1 Votes

FHTM A Legal Pryamid

I was approached by someone from FHTM the business concept looks great. When I looked deeper into it you can make money soley off of the recruitment and also off of the monthly subscription fee of $25 for your website. They do pay people and people make money at it . But I would say that it is a very well ran a legit pryamid based of off subscription fees. Maybe i'm wrong but this is what I found out. First off all is this legal?

  • On
    onebuffbabe03pv Mar 05, 2010

    It is legal only because it involves services and products. However with FHTM you have to purchase 3 points as they call them. They recommend a website, a conference call access and one other of your choice (one acts like AAA where they will help you if you have car trouble and one called park amusement where you get coupons for dinners and movies etc). Each of those points cost $20- 30 a month. They also reward you with other coupons and other such credit for signing people up for cell phones and cable instead of that guy at the quiosk at the mall or the guy on the other side of the phone getting credit for it. So you are not directly paid for some of the services and products, you mostly get commission for recruiting sales reps underneath you, so in theory it is a pyramid scheme but its legal because there are products and services as well.

    0 Votes
  • Ne
    networkmarketing Jun 07, 2010

    Pyramid is against the law, seems you are closed minded person. In todays struggling economy and our governmemnt taking our business over seas we are left to what? I have good friend in the business and doing very well. Average people doing what is right in America, making money and providing a better way of life. The company is debt free and pays good hard workers with a decent income. This Business requires work. Open minded people only. You already use the service or some, so why not get paid. I guess some people expect things be really easy, hard work pays off. So be best that you do not join as it seems you are close minded and negative thinker. Go watch The Secret, anything is possible. Who can you trust, Corporate America, US Govenment and are you end a dead end job? Learn to take risk.

    -1 Votes
  • Le
    Leslie Koolidgedalm Aug 05, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM operates an unlawful product-based endless recruiting pyramid scheme that relies on untrue and misleading representations and unlawful, unfair, and fraudulent business practices. While FHTM purports to be in the business of selling name-brand services like wireless, satellite television, home security, vitamins, nutritional products and travel services, its true business is using consumers to generate fee income for representing non-existent partnerships, major sports figures, and prominent businessmen. To entice consumers to participate, FHTM makes untrue or misleading claims regarding its relationship with Fortune 100 companies like Verizon Wireless, GE Security, Dish Networks and Travelocity to create the illusion that consumers can become millionaires in three to five years.

    FHTM’s growth exploded when it began to lure consumers disenchanted with traditional jobs and the recession that began in 2007 to inspirational and high-pressure business opportunity seminars touting an innovative business model that promises huge financial rewards through multi-level network marketing. FHTM erring presenters claim to have proprietary tools, special relationships, and other support that allow consumers to grow their own business by partnering with FHTM’s “companies”.

    It would not be long before Isaacs (and the world) made several troubling discoveries about FHTM’s business plan and practices that doused his enthusiasm: (1) Paul Orberson had not made any special arrangements with the companies mentioned at the business opportunity/presentation seminar or in the company produced videos; (2) the only way to earn a significant income and be promoted up the ranks was to recruit additional IRs; (3) FHTM had not received regulatory approval for its pyramiding scheme in every state; (4) only a handful of IRs had earned anywhere near the residuals projected; (5) the prominent businessmen, politicians, former attorney generals and sports figures to whom FHTM constantly alluded were in fact IRs actively promoting their own FHTM business; and (6) a growing number of state attorneys general had already begun investigating FHTM in response to numerous complaints.

    It turns out that FHTM’s ‘innovative’ marketing plan is nothing more than a face lift to an age-old scheme. According to the FTC’s Consumer Protection Bureau:

    Pyramid schemes now come in so many forms that they may be difficult to recognize immediately. However, they all share one overriding characteristic. They promise consumers or investors large profits based primarily on recruiting others to join their program, not based on profits from any real investment or real sale of goods to the public. Some schemes may purport to sell a product, but they often simply use the product to hide their pyramid structure. There are two tell-tale signs that a product is simply being used to disguise a pyramid scheme: inventory loading and a lack of retail sales. Inventory loading occurs when a company's incentive program forces recruits to buy more products than they could ever sell, often at inflated prices. If this occurs throughout the company's distribution system, the people at the top of the pyramid reap substantial profits, even though little or no product moves to market. The people at the bottom make excessive payments for inventory that simply accumulates in their basements. A lack of retail sales is also a red flag that a pyramid exists. Many pyramid schemes will claim that their product is selling like hot cakes. However, on closer examination, the sales occur only between people inside the pyramid structure or to new recruits joining the structure, not to consumers out in the general public.

    Nonetheless, the truth is catching up with FHTM. On December 10, 2009, The North Dakota Attorney General's Office filed a Cease and Desist Order for violation of the Consumer Fraud Law, the Transient Merchant Law, the Home Solicitation Sales Law, and the North Dakota Pyramid Schemes Act. On January 19, 2010, FHTM entered into a Assurance of Voluntary Compliance with the North Dakota Attorney General's Office. On March 16, 2010, the Montana State Auditor's Office filed a Temporary Cease and Desist Order against FHTM, Paul C. Orberson, Thomas A. Mills, and Dianne Graber (a Montana IR). According to the Montana State Auditor's Office, FHTM has engaged in acts or practices constituting violations of the Securities Act of Montana, Montana Code ANN.30-10-101 et seq. On April 22, 2010, FHTM agreed to pay nearly $1 million and to change its business practices to resolve the charge that it is operating a pyramid promotional scheme.

    With each passing day, more states are jumping on FHTM’s bandwagon. The alarming rise in consumer complaints and governmental sanctions has prompted the Better Business Bureau of Central and Eastern Kentucky to downgrade FHTM’s rating from “B-” to “F”. At the same time, a proliferation of online bulletin boards and blogs, such as www.complaintsboard.com and www.scams.com criticize FHTM’s pyramid scheme confirms that Isaacs’ experience is not unique. Will those operations be the next target of Fortune’s high price legal team?

    http://www.sao.mt.gov/legal/securities/S10_HITECH Cease and Desist.pdf

    http://www.whas11.com/news/business/I-Team-Inivestigation-Fortune-Hi-Tech-Marketing-94266814.html

    http://www.whas11.com/community/I-Team-Investigation-Fortune-Hi-Tech-Marketing-94273719.html

    Dec 10, 2009
    North Dakota Attorney General issues a Cease and Desist against Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing for several violations
    http://www.ag.state.nd.us/documents/FortuneCeaseandDesist.pdf

    http://www.ag.state.nd.us/NewsReleases/2009/12-11-09.pdf

    March 4th, 2010
    Montana State Auditor issues a Cease and Desist against Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing after receiving numerous complaints
    http://www.sao.mt.gov/legal/securities/S10_HITECH Cease and Desist.pdf
    KFBB News video
    http://www.kfbb.com/news/local/87709867.html?video=YHI&t=a

    March 7, 2010
    A thin line between legal and illegal in multi-level marketing
    http://www.kentucky.com/2010/03/07/1171075/a-thin-line-between-legal-and.html

    March 10, 2010
    Peter Lamas Pulls out of FHTM in the U.S.
    http://gravittefhtm.info/wordpress/?p=234

    March 17, 2010
    Kentucky Lexington Herald-Leader writes “Montana says Lexington Company is a pyramid scheme, Fortune Marketing company Banned”
    http://www.kentucky.com/2010/03/17/1184218/montana-says-lexington-company.html

    March 26, 2010
    Better Business Bureau News Center
    http://spokane.bbb.org/article/fortune-hi-tech-marketing-of-ky-holding-meetings-in-region-recruiting-in-wa-state-18461

    March 27, 2010
    Washington KNDO News aired “Better Business Bureau warns about possible pyramid scheme”
    http://www.kndo.com/Global/story.asp?S=12214040

    April 22nd, 2010
    FHTM agrees to pay nearly $1 million to settle allegations that FHTM was operating a pyramid promotional scheme in Montana.
    http://www.sao.mt.gov/news/20100422HiTech.html

    May 18th, 2010
    San Antonio, Texas Ken5 news airs false claims about FHTM
    http://www.kens5.com/news/local/Shady-network-marketing-company-comes-to-San-Antonio-area-94208419.html

    May 19th & 20th, 2010
    I-Team Investigation in Louisville, KY, FHTM’s home state, did a 2 part investigation into FHTM. Supported by supportive facts
    http://www.whas11.com/news/business/I-Team-Inivestigation-Fortune-Hi-Tech-Marketing-94266814.html

    May 27th, 2010
    Charlotte, NC WCNC News exposes high profile people in FHTM found to be untrue
    http://www.wcnc.com/home/Pyramid-scheme-recruits-high-profile-sales-reps-94971214.html

    May 27th, 2010
    Charlotte, NC – Charlotte, Observer
    'Pyramid scheme' recruits high profile sales reps
    http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2010/05/27/1462263/pyramid-scheme-recruits-high-profile.html

    July 15, 2010
    WCNC News Charlotte, NC I-Team Investigation exposes FHTM’s earnings
    http://www.wcnc.com/home/IN-FHTM-PYRAMID-SCHEME-FEW-EARN-MUCH-MONEY---98543069.html

    Lexington, KY BBB has given FHTM the lowest rating for a company an F for most of the year
    http://www.lexington.bbb.org/commonreport.html?compid=14004419

    1 Votes
  • Bn
    Bnick Aug 05, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    No, FHTM does not fit the traditional definition of a pyramid scheme. Real products and services are being sold to consumers through the network of Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing representatives. These products and services include cell phone plans, internet telephone service plans, nutritional supplements and travel discounts.

    However, since reps are independent, it is not known at any given time whether or not certain outlandish income claims are being made. Any company with thousands of sales representatives can potentially find itself misrepresented. There are plenty of representatives in this company who are successful.

    MLM business models are a legitimate method for the selling and promoting of consumer goods and services. However, when the company is found to be emphasizing recruitment of new distributors over the acquisition of product customers, this is where the legitimate MLM model can morph into a genuine pyramid scheme.

    Pyramid schemes are illegal as they focus mainly on fast money that is earned by selling the business opportunity that is, selling the opportunity to recruit others into the business instead of selling the opportunity to sell actual products and services. (see article by Cathy Yeatts)

    -1 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Feb 27, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FHTM is no longer authorized to use the DuPont name, logo, or trademark in any way. FHTM should immediately discontinue the use of any materials containing the DuPont logo. Our right to use DuPont’s name, logo and trademark was revoked because FHTM abused the system by creating and distributing unapproved marketing materials that displayed the DuPont logo.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 11, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at ftc.gov/bizopps or youtube.com/FTCvideos.

    www.fhtmclassaction.info for all of the latest reports on this scam

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Apr 08, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    According to Corporate Frauds Watch
    In 'MLM business opportunity' frauds, direct association with trusted brands has been a lie by Shyam

    In a previous post, I drew your free-thinking readers' attention to some remarkable optical illusions which clearly demonstrate that the human mind can be easily deceived simply by changing the context in which we see things http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-11553099 . A stalking-panther, when photographed in a jungle environment, is almost invisible to the human eye if shown only in black and white, but the same dangerous predator is immediately obvious to us when shown in color. Two squares of identical color and shade, appear to be of completely different color and shade when each one is surrounded by squares which alter the context in which our minds automatically see them.

    No one now seriously disputes that deluded, core-'MLM' adherents look at 'MLM business opportunity' frauds only in two dimensions, 'positive' and 'negative.' A growing mountain of quantifiable evidence proves that vast numbers of ill-informed people have been deceived into entering this style of camouflaged totalitarian cult, then, on the pretext that 'the duplication of a step-by-step positive plan will lead to success, ' they have been intellectually-castrated (without their fully-informed consent) so that their minds will only accept what their leaders have arbitrarily defined as 'positive, ' and to exclude what these same charlatans have arbitrarily defined as 'negative.' When seen only in the fake 'positive' context of: 'Business', 'Independence', 'Financial Freedom', 'Direct Selling', 'Low Risk', 'Income Opportunity', etc. 'MLM business opportunity' frauds can appear to be authentic. This dangerous inversion of reality has been further confirmed by (apparently independent) : celebrity endorsements, glossy-advertizing, 'Direct Selling Associations', etc.; all of which form a pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity, because all these artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts have actually been financed by the profits of fraud in order to continue to perpetrate the same fraud. It is only when you take 'MLM business opportunity' frauds out of their artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts, that their true, predatory nature becomes immediately obvious.

    One of the most-deceptive, fake 'positive' contexts in which 'MLM business opportunity' frauds have been presented is there apparent direct association with trusted brands. Currently, in the USA, the millionaire racketeers behind the 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' lie are being challenged in court for having pretended direct association with some of America's most famous companies: including: General Electric, DuPont, Time, Verizon Wireless and AT&T, Travelocity, Peter Lamas and BSP Rewards Mall. For, according to documents presented in court, none of these companies has ever had a direct association with 'FHTM.' Furthermore, the officers of all these companies were actually unaware that their valuable brand-names and trademarks were being used by racketeers to commit fraud. The only connection that the 'FHTM' fake has had with all these authentic companies is that 'FHTM' has been a corporate customer of their products and services. Yet again, the use of this devious technique of psychological persuasion has been copied from the original 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, 'Amway.'

    According to an 'FHTM' whistleblower, Joseph Isaacs: 'When these companies find out that their trademarks, names, logos and reputations are being used by FHTM in order to aide FHTM in proving its legitimacy they will issue a cease and desist order, insist on actions to stop or not allow FHTM to market their products'. Indeed, currently every one of the companies listed above has either issued a cease and desist order against 'FHTM, ' or no longer allows itself to be aligned with 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing.'

    Again, according to Joseph Isaacs, 'FHTM leaders would systematically tell prospects during presentations that FHTM must be legal, because no iconic Fortune 100 company would affiliate with a scam' and that 'all of these major companies had sent their CEO’s and legal teams to meet with FHTM founder, Paul Orberson, to evaluate his MLM company.' Self-evidently these scripted-lies were part of an overall pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity.

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

    0 Votes
  • Te
    TeamFrankie Jul 12, 2011

    I have been in FHTM for a year now. I increased my income to pay off debt! Part time I have made a lot more than I did as an educator! The company pays out for sales brought into the company! Instead of selling door to door, just get a few people that want to make money using products and sharing that idea! The company is great!! People may mis-represent anything in life, don't let a few people ruin a great company and the chance for people to have an opportunity to make a great financial change in their life! What I have experienced in a year is that it does take hard work, most people are not willing to do what it takes to succeed! I don't see anyone slamming vacuum cleaner sales companies... The success rate is probably not good, what about all the small businesses that have gone under, was the whole plan to own a business a scam because they were not successful? In the world today, fill out an application.. Maybe you will get an interview... 15 show up.. They hire 1.. are jobs a scam?? Not everyone will be successful, But they at least have a Chance to TRY with FHTM!

    0 Votes

FHTM NOT a Scam

NO, FHTM is NOT a scam!!!

Is Morals1 starved for attention or what. I might have missed some of his posts. So, I don't know if he has ever been in FHTM himself (I guess it's a he.) Nevertheless, he is spewing a lot of harsh criticism at a company, which does not deserve it. I basically agree with the comments of altagirl73 and Macronder. I very recently joined FHTM. In the past I have been in several MLM's, and never had any success except selling the products.

In the brief time I have been in Fortune, I have found everyone I have met to be very good representatives of what I regard as THE BEST MLM ever, and I am off to a good start – better than any other ventures. Before I was introduced to Fortune, I had decided I would never participate in another MLM. However, as soon as I saw the presentation, I knew I had to join Fortune. FHTM was created and designed to help everyone who is willing and able to work to be successful. It clearly is not something for nothing. Anyone, who joins Fortune should be fully aware that they will have to work to be successful. Common sense tells you that.

As the quote Macronder mentioned says "MLM is for everybody, not everybody is for MLM."

It does help if you are a natural “people person.” Depending on a person's personality, some might have to work harder than others to “get out of their comfort zone” and approach others about the opportunity. That will be a basic determinant of success. There are millions of people out there, who are very capable of building an FHTM business.

It should be very clear after seeing the Fortune presentation that a lot of people contact will be necessary to build a business. Anyone who thinks otherwise is being naive. When I presented the plan to a friend recently, I emphasized to her that I had some concerns about who she would sponsor, and I repeatedly made the point of the need to get out of one's comfort zone.

The fact is that FHTM offers an OPPORTUNITY for success to people at a time when many millions of us don't see much opportunity. I know – Morals1 will say FHTM is preying on the downtrodden. Since I happen to be one of those downtrodden, and I don't see ANY other way out of the mess that I am in, I am thankful that Fortune at least offers me an opportunity. It is up to ME with the help of my upline (which is great by the way) to make a success of the opportunity.

Now, back to Morals1. Morals1 seems like a misnomer to me. He and others who harshly criticize FHTM seem like despicable dream-stealers to me. I hesitate to say this, because he will probably salivate over it, but comments like his have really thrown cold water on the dreams of some people I know, who were already in Fortune and some who were considering the opportunity. And, the bad-mouthing is not justified!

I had a bad experience with a major TV and appliance retailer (it was NOT Best Buy) a few years ago. It was like working with a car salesman during the original purchase and I later found out that he had indeed SCREWED me. When I later confronted the store manager about it, he passed me off to the home office, and they told me corporate policy would not allow them to remedy my screw-job. This is the first time I have blogged about this incident, and of course I still am NOT naming the company. Crazy things happen and people complain about ALL companies rightly or wrongly, but companies stay in business, because for the most part they do a good an honorable job.

So, Morals1, why don't you take your acid tongue some where else. Get a life and let people with real dreams have an opportunity to realize them on their own.

  • Ra
    rangerbase Feb 17, 2010

    Look, if you people are honestly that supportive of this company, then spend more effort NOT posting on a complaint board! These posts show up in search results and cause slander about the fhtm that you love so much! It really does not make any sense to me. Respond in a proper manner to negative posts and move on. I am looking for legit info about fhtm and I have seen more ignorant ranting than actual information!

    POST FACTS AND NOT FEELINGS!!!

    0 Votes
  • Fr
    fresh2010 Mar 31, 2010

    Facts are always good. Here are a few good ones. FHTM is not a scam, it's more like a scheme. On december of 09 north dakota filed a cease and desist and a opportunity for a hearing. in jan of 2o1o fhtm paid a settement of 125o0 and anyone who wanted a refund all they had to do was ask back for there money. not enuff facts for you. ok. on marh 16 2010, Montana state filed the same judgement with is still pending. Montana State sling accusations of fraud based upon information they obtained from investigations from the so called companies they were in partnership with. now i say its not a scam because you dont completely get ripped of for your money you earn money, but just partially how they say. The part about earning a percentage of customer's payments are completely false, because fhtm has no contract or agreement with any of those companies they mentioned, but the true part is you earn money from everyone you get to join this company. The more people you get joined the more you make, if you get 9 people to join you'll get a payment for for those nine people. thats as far as your making money from this company goes. hence FHTM is not a scam but a twisted scheme. Incase someone wants to argue about who's right and who's wrong on this topic. Don't take my word for it, see for yourself, visit the better business beareu at www.bbb.org

    0 Votes
  • Oe
    OEFWarrior Jun 06, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Wake up and smell the deception! FHTM is collecting millions and disbursing a mere pittance. As to top tier companies aligned with FHTM that’s crap! Validate your information, I went back and carefully listened to the video by Joel McNitch and others talking about FHTM and noticed they are VERY precise in their selection of words and terms. Name recognition is a key point in their presentation. During their scripted presentation they ask if you’ve heard of a company called Home Depot, of course you have, then they go on to say “How would you like to get paid for shopping there?” but they do not say they are partnered with them, (because they are NOT) they talk about their partnership with a company called BSP then they pop up a sign with Home Depot, Macy’s, Best Buy and Chili’s. This is a true representation of BSP rewards, NOT FHTM. But the allure of making a few thousand (or at least that’s what you’re lead to believe) is just too much. Open your eyes, I’m sure you believed you could make tons of money and you've enlisted the help of family and friends to accomplish this. Now you can't go back and tell them you were wrong. This company is NOT here to help you they are here to exploit you!
    MyTelTag
    This is a product only available to Representatives and costs $19.99 a month. So clearly buying this won't make you money as a representative, and in fact will cost you $19.99 a month.
    Peter Lamas has a direct affiliate program paying 20%, that is free to sign up for. So going through FHTM pays you .5%, and signing up for a free affiliate account pays 20%.
    Choice Plans RX
    This is a FHTM company that they pay Ocenture to set up and run for them. When you go to the website, it has copyright FHTM, but when you look who owns the domain name, all contact emails are to ocenture.com email addresses. If you use this product, remember you are actually buying from FHTM, and be sure to check prices you are paying against a site such as drugstore.com. A spot check of the price list shows the drug Pegasys for 180MCG/0.5 for $1, 482.23. It appears to be available from drugstore.com as a 1ml vial for $651.98. If the 0.5 in the ChoicePlanRX price refers to half a ML, then you pay $2, 964.46 for 1ml, while at drugstore.com you can get it for $651.98. I suggest you look at the prices yourself.
    Health Card
    This product is yet another product that FHTM paid Ocenture to run, and Ocenture uses VantageAmerica Solutions, Inc. to run the card discounts. It looks like FHTM paid Ocenture to rebrand their pre packaged product called MedAffordable. so you can work with just one middle man instead of three (FHTM, Ocenture, and VantageAmericaSolutions)
    Travel FHTM
    This is another service where FHTM paid Ocenture to rebrand and rename their existing product called TrotHop, and to set up an affiliate site through Travelocity, to book tickets through an airline. If you buy from TravelFHTM, you are going through three middlemen to reach the airline (FHTM, Ocenture, & Travelocity). Basically this service uses Travelocity, rebranded to look like TravelFHTM, adding on a fee to each ticket. Tickets tend to be $5 – $10 dollars more on TravelFHTM than buying straight from Travelocity, you can test this by checking the price for an identical flight through Travelocity and TravelFHTM. Also, in order to offer this product, the representative must pay $49.99
    Roadside AutoClub
    This is simply a service set up by Ocenture to provide roadside assistance. You can go to http://ocenture.com/PrePackPrograms to look at all the services Ocenture can set up for your organization. It looks like this is what FHTM did.
    Ingrid Home Security
    The link to this service did not work, so I was unable to assess what this service was. If the link is not working, it's safe to say you can't use this service.
    Protect America
    This appears to be a GE security product that FHTM markets, by going through an authorized dealer, greatalarms.com. So you have 2 middle men, (FHTM and greatalarms.com) As of 2.26.10, the FHTM's site had free* sign up options, but the asterisk beside the FREE does not have an explanation. It should include this: * "Standard monitoring agreement required with approved credit. ", FHTM is misleading if they don't show the disclaimer. It is not free.
    FortuneTV.info
    This is a product only available to Fortune Representatives, and so is not a way for FHTM reps to make money.
    EZnet Tools
    This is a Quick Website Creation Company that welcomes Multi Level Marketing Companies as affiliates. If you want to set up a simple website, I suggest you use a reputable company like wordpress.com, who can have you online on your own domain name for $15 a year
    Dish Network
    Anyone can become an affiliate of Dish Network, and be paid $150 per installation, you can become an affiliate at vmc satelliet on the net.. Compare that to 8 cents through FHTM, and the best choice is clear.
    The Wireless Shop
    One of the most talked about services at FHTM is the wireless shop. This is a website that FHTM uses Simplexity to run. You can buy cell phones and cell phone contracts through this service. Simplexity uses linkshare.com to purchase these services. By going through FHTM Wireless Shop you appear to be using three middlemen (FHTM, Simplexity, and Linkshare). Linkshare can be joined for free by going to simplexity's site which can be joined for free by going to Simplexity or Link Share and clicking on "Join Our Wireless Program Today" and create a free affiliate account, and start earning the full commission instead of the .05 cents FHTM gives back to their representatives. With this free account, you can earn affiliate money from many companies, So FHTM does not really have a direct relationship with Verizon and AT&T, contrary to the impression given by the company.
    As I pointed out above the wireless shop is an affiliate membership which pays from $35 to $51 dollars per contract sold. FHTM is then taking this breaking it down into 24 equal payment and calling it a 1/4 percent. When in fact they are only paying out .05 cents of what you earned, which totals $1.20 which leaves $49.80 in FHTM’s pocket. Look at their schedule of payments in their Policies and Procedures pamphlet page 46.
    Looking at the attached chart you can see the two columns highlighted are “The Wireless Shop” and “Dish Network” both of which the dolar amount listed is the payout per contract, NOT 1/4 percent! So they are paying 5 cents for your wireless and 8 cents for Dish Network. Would it surprise you to know that Dish network pays $150 per contract.

    By level 8; FHTM makes $2, 952, 00 paying out $984, 100 In so called residuals they make approximately $1, 238, 489 don’t forget to take into account annual dues which total $1, 312, 200 and $2, 952, 000 annually and that’s for the use of their website of which you make absolutely nothing. How many times over (since 2001) has FHTM made it to level 8?
    No legally this is not against the law but no matter how you look at it, THIS IS A SCAM!

    0 Votes
  • Te
    tetto Jun 15, 2010

    I would like to know if the people who are making these complaints did they work hard at this business or did they say ok i have a business and now the money should be rolling in any day?

    0 Votes
  • Yv
    yvonne day Jul 19, 2010

    If you have been cheated by Fortune or feel that FORTUNE has mislead you into thinking that they had contracts with all of these companies or any other issues, then please email us at cheatedbyfortune at yahoo.com
    This is not to recruit you to anything else.

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 21, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners

    Attorney General Roy Cooper today joined state attorneys general from across the country and the Federal Trade Commission to announce a national sweep targeting business opportunity scams, including actions against four companies that have targeted North Carolina consumers.
    “When jobs are scarce, claims to help people make money fast become plentiful, ” Cooper said. “Consumers think they’re buying into a great way to earn a living, but they could end up paying far more than they’ll ever make.”

    In challenging economic times, many people in the state are looking for work. Unfortunately, sometimes they find scams instead of legitimate opportunities. Complaints to the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division about business opportunity, work-at-home schemes, and other employment related scams were up 11 percent last year, from 177 complaints in 2009 to 197 complaints in 2010.

    Operation Empty Promises is a national sweep by the FTC, Cooper and other state attorneys general aimed at stopping business opportunity scams and educating consumers about how to avoid them. Announced as part of the sweep are actions taken by Cooper’s Consumer Protection Division against four companies including Fortune Hi Tech Marketing who claims that people who buy into its business earn thousands of dollars a year. Based on consumer complaints, Cooper’s office launched an investigation into FHTM in mid 2010. Consumers say they paid money to the company but were only able to make money by recruiting others into the scheme, not by selling any actual goods or services. A total of 25 consumers have now complained about FHTM, and Cooper’s office is investigating the company. Although this case is currently under investigation, it’s important for consumers to know that a pyramid scheme is a violation of the law and is defined as any plan in which a participant pays money for the chance to receive money upon the introduction of new participants into the program.

    “We’re looking closely at business opportunities that seem to offer false hopes, and also reaching out to educate consumers on how to recognize and avoid fraud, ” Cooper said.

    Later this month, Cooper’s office plans to launch a tool kit to educate consumers on fake business opportunities which will include print, web and video materials. The goal is to prevent North Carolina consumers from losing their hard-earned money to scammers trying to take advantage of a tough employment market.

    “Don’t let scammers use empty promises of jobs with high earnings to take your money, ” Cooper warned consumers. “Before you agree to invest in any business, check it out thoroughly and always be skeptical of claims of guaranteed profits.”

    Cooper has taken action against a number of other kinds of scams fueled by hard times. For example, his Consumer Protection Division has won 13 cases against foreclosure assistance and loan modification scams in the past five years, including two so far in 2011.The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at the FTC website.

    0 Votes
  • Sh
    shutupandworkforit Jun 17, 2012

    Too many people want to just have their 'Fortune' given to them without actually having to go work for it. It amazes me that no matter what - these people will whine and cry over the fact that it didn't work for them... Did they work for it? Really? Did they push up their sleeves and actually get in and do the WORK that is involved with any business? Or are they just sitting on their couches waiting for checks to roll in? If you didn't go out and work for it - guess what? you aren't going to get paid for it.

    0 Votes

FHTM — SHUT DOWN

FINALLY the goverment is seeing what we have been saying! North Dakota attorney Generals office has closed...

FHTM — pay

I worked hard and FHTM has cheated me out of my pay! But I still believe in Direct Marketing! I just have to...

FHTM — Scam

Myself and a very good friend of mine were talked into signing up for FHTM Canada on the good word of a close...

In The News

Unhappy consumers gather online at Complaintsboard.com and have already logged thousands of complaints
If you see dozens of complaints about a certain company on ComplaintsBoard, walk away.
One of the largest consumer sites online. Posting here your concerns means good exposure for your issues
A consumer site aimed at exposing unethical companies and business practices
ComplaintsBoard is a good source for product and company gripes from especially dissatisfied people
You'll definitely get some directions on how customer service can best solve your problem