SUBMIT A COMPLAINT

[Resolved] Learning RXFraud- Unqualified professional Staffs

5
S Sanford, FL Review updated:

As a hard working parent, I was taken back to recently find out that the owner of the learning RX in Sanford Florida -Ms. Suzanne Gory was a hairstylist for the past nine years . If I would have known this important inforamtion I would have never given this person the day of light not because of her hair stylist career but this was a deep and serious matter I was dealing with. Our child's academic challenges and $5000.00 dollars of flash cards. A total fraud in my dictionary. i would like to strongly advice future parents to seek deeper into the background of the people who call themselves professional in brain development or learning strategists areas which they have very little knowledge working with ADD, ADHD or any other brian training skills. it is sad to be mislead and believe that the people involved are high prepared for the task of helping our children and only being there for the money.

More Learning RX Complaints & Reviews

Responses

  • K
      Aug 11, 2009

    I understand that it seems odd that a hair dresser would own a brain training center. But let me respond to why this is very plausible. Our program is based on scientific research, but was birthed and developed in the clinical setting. We did start out in hospitals and in doctor’s offices. We have had specialist and professionals help us refine our program to the point where we are getting very significant changes in the half the time we did thirty years ago (back in the late 70’s early 80’s.) (See all three of our studies on our website.) Today we have many professionals who own a LearningRx center – Psychologist, Audiologist, Speech Pathologist, Occupational Therapist, Educational PhDs, and many other professionals. They all bring an expertise to our system. But, they all have to follow our system, exactly. Over the years we have found that skill and passion far out-weigh a person’s background for delivering our training and great customer service. Six years ago when we put our training into a franchise system, we opened it up to those outside of the medical and educational fields. We had parents coming to us with children who desperately needed our program, but didn’t have a center in their area. (Some of these parents would drive more than an hour each way three or more times a week, or even cross state lines to give their child our training.) The impact it had on their lives so was great and so life changing that they wanted to bring it to their community and help families in their neighborhoods. So we now let a parent, who is a great business person and will follow our systems to a T, (They also go through extensive training) run a LearningRx center.
    Our training is much more than flash cards. (We don’t use typical flash cards) It is one on one personal fitness training for the brain. I urge anyone who has a loved one who is struggling or just needs an edge to give our training a try. You won’t be sorry. I have personally seen our training help student after student, after student. I have a son who was born with PDD and was told by doctors that he would never read and would have limited speech. He reads today, because of LearningRx! Not a day goes by that I don’t thank God for putting LearningRx in my life and in the lives of others.
    Kim Hanson
    V.P. of LearningRx

    0 Votes
  • S
      Sep 03, 2009

    I also have a child who went through a LearningRx program and I am very happy with the results. Prior to signing up, I did inquire about academic qualifications and requested a trainer who had an educational degree. The match between my son and his trainer was extraordinary and she was able to push him far beyond what I could do (we did the partner program where I was responsible for working with him at home also).

    He made HUGE gains in his short-term memory and his confidence soared. We were required to meet with the director every 4 weeks to make sure we were doing our home training and staying with the program. I was also required to meet with the trainer once a week to learn new procedures and how to work him harder. I don't know anything about flash cards but the materials we received were outstanding and my son still uses some of them when we have time together - he really likes the golf and the puzzles. We are very happy with our experience and would recommend LearningRx to anyone that asks us.

    0 Votes
  • J
      Sep 22, 2009

    I did research on this company, their claims have no basis in fact. 80% of kids have learning problems! Where's the research? Only LearningRX claims this, most well respected researchers say more like 2-8%. LearningRx is all hype.

    I took my son there to see how they did things, lots of promises, flashy marketing, but short on real substance.

    0 Votes
  • A
      Sep 22, 2009

    Wow! I am having a difficult time trying to decide how to respond. First of all, you complain about the owner being a hairstylist, then say your complaint is "not because of the hair stylist career." Which is it? The rest of your complaint also is difficult to "decode" because your grammar, spelling and sentence structure causes the reader to have to "guess" what you mean. Did you complete the course, how long did you attend, did you work with your child? Did you have an understanding of what was needed and did YOU have the ability to assist? You stated that you are a "hard working parent." Does this mean that you hold down a job and didn't have time to devote to Learning Rx with your child? My family also participated in Learning Rx. My daughter was matched with a consummate professional who possessed he personality and experience that enhanced the learning process. She had short-term memory, auditory, processing problems and other learning difficulties. It was a lot of hard work to pull her through the course. We worked very, very hard on all of the activities together. It wasn't a piece of cake. One doesn't just pay the money and expect the "professionals" at LearninRx to do it for you. But the end was well worth it because you find out it wasn't really the end after all. We finished up with a celebration party about 8 months ago at the Learning Rx facility. Still, today, my daughter is a new butterfly. It is wonderful that it transfers over to other things besides academics. I was just thinking today, wow, thank goodness for Learning Rx. Her piano playing has improved dramatically, she organizes her day and week so that her work gets done AHEAD of time. (How great is that for a 12-year old). The reason she can do this (and if you asked her she will tell you) is because Learning Rx helped her organize her thoughts. For her, it was too hard to sift through them and figure out what to remember, what to do, or how to prioritize. In fact, halfway through LearningRx, she picked up a book and started reading it on her own. This was something I never thought I would see. Her marks are As and Bs, not because she is so smart, but because she can organize her notes, notebook, homework, and study time. The program wore me out, it wore her out too But, she looked forward to the weekly visits in Sanford. She loved it, in fact, as did I. We had terrific experiences there. It was well worth the effort and investment. The results speak for themselves. In fact, my daughter mentions using some of the learned techniques to remember course work. How cool! Don't give up on Learning Rx and don't sell them short. They are very dedicated and knowledgeable people. Just be willing to work as hard as your kid does to pull them through it. It will be the best investment of their lives!

    -1 Votes
  • M
      Sep 23, 2009

    my granddaughter was unable to sit still, unable to focus or concentrate due to having ADHD. When she started the program we were unsure if she would be able to graduate 1st grade or not. Through the perserverance of the staff and their committment to their students, my grand daughter not only was promoted into second grade but she scored in the 88 percentile and above on the post test. She has the required passing score to be permitted to attend college according to the test results. Her ability to read has excelled because of the staff at Learning Rx and them not giving up on my grand daughter. It was a touch 9 months. But with the help of ALL at Learning Rx and myself, husband and her father, she is a wonderful little lady, able to sit still and concentrate, able to focus enough to take exams within the allowed time and pass them with high scores.My grand daughter tests out as a 140 or higher IQ but you would have never known it before she started at Learning Rx and now that she has graduated the programs. I have had both family members and friends who have not seen her in 15 months or so comment on the transformation of this child. They are all in awe. I would recommend this program to anyone interested in promoting and enhancing education with their child. The trainer that worked with my grand daughter was the best and matched up with my grand daughter according to her personality and her ability to be stern and assertive when needed but to give positive feedback for work well done.


    Franklin Family
    Deland, Florida

    -1 Votes
  • W
      Oct 11, 2009

    I love complaint boards (not!). The initial complaint is always so vague and meaningless: "I went there, I didn't like it = A SCAM!"

    Then, when asked to clarify, the OP is never heard from again. Based on the behavior of those who post to complaint boards, we can conclude they really don't care about what they have written, because they don't bother to make it useful for the reader.

    I treat all complaints this way, whether in person or on the 'nets.

    +1 Votes
  • G
      Nov 07, 2009

    There isn't even a LRX in Sanford, FL, nor is there a Suzanne Gory as a franchise owner in the company. Secondly, the 80% is not that 80% of children have learning disabilities, it's 80% of learning and reading difficulties are the direct consequence of cognitive skill weakness.

    +1 Votes
  • G
      Nov 07, 2009

    There is a LRX franchise owner named Suzanne Gory in Lake Mary, Fl. and she's amazing. Does it matter your background or just that you want to be a part of changing lives? Thousands have seen the positive effects of LRX. Learning and reading difficulties don't have to be permanent.

    +1 Votes
  • T
      Dec 06, 2009

    I worked for learningRx in a management position and as a trainer. I can tell you that the relationships built between students and their trainers are genuine and kids typically will see results if everything is followed correctly., .. However i witnessed test scores being changed to persuade parents to sign up or continue after completion... It is grossly overcharged without a flat rate so each family pays what the owners can get out of them! All LearningRx does is play the same kind of brain games you can find on children video games or in toy stores. That coupled with a motivational trainer who does nothing but uplift is positive, its not the program itself that's a problem it is the fact that now franchisees can open up shop, claim to be pseudo-medical and exploit children with disabilities by taking advantage of their desperate families...

    Beware!

    0 Votes
  • N
      Jan 03, 2010

    The charges made by "thetruthbetold" are very serious. The fact the he/she worked within the organization makes them even more serious.

    I was thinking of sending my son to the LearningRx in Chester, NJ, but now I'm not so sure.

    Yes, LearningRx is a for-profit company--there is nothing wrong with that. However, if they are interested solely in profits, and if they are taking advantage of parents' desperation to help their children, then they are guilty of the worst kind of offense: exploitation of children for financial gain; children who are developmentally disabled, no less. They certainly wouldn't be the first.

    I'm waiting for a plausible response from Learning Rx on the comments made by "thetruthbetold".

    +1 Votes
  • E
      Jan 05, 2010

    I worked for them for many years, and they are EXTREMELY corrupt. The trainers are all great people who do exactly as they are told, and help motivate the students. However, they will scam you out of your money and falsify test results. I felt guilty being a part of it after a while.

    +1 Votes
  • L
      Jan 07, 2010

    Wow. I guess there will be all types of opinions here, and here goes mine. I worked for a LearningRx franchise in one state and now own a LearningRx center in another. I have never witnessed, authorized or even thought about falsifying test scores or anything of the like. One of the reasons I have been with this company for over 5 years is for the home office staff and the caliber of people that I have met through the system. Honesty, integrity and a true passion for helping people is the common thread among franchisees. I'm sure there are some out there who have had bad experiences, but I would encourage those parents interested in getting help for their child to check out their local center for themselves. Ask to meet with the Director, take a tour, even talk with other parents who have been through or are currently part of the program.

    +1 Votes
  • T
      Jan 15, 2010

    As part of the LearningRx home office staff I would like to respond to some of the comments.
    I have worked with LearningRx and the programs for 14 years and have never heard of someone falsifying test results. If this did happen I wish that the employee had contacted us at the home office, we would never allow this and would have taken swift action. The reality is that we have wonderful test results, but if parents didn't see the huge changes in their own child the test results wouldn't matter. For over 10 years our company doubled every year on "word of mouth" alone, way before we had any magazines and nice graphics.

    The founder of the company, Dr. Ken Gibson is one of the most giving people I have ever met. There is not a corrupt bone in his body. If you want to get an idea of how this company is run and how he asks his franchisees to run their business I suggest you read his book, "The Purpose Directed Business". I am happy to send you a free copy of the digital version ([protected]@learningrx.com). Dr. Gibson has set up his company so that a large percentage of profit is given away to charities. The company actually received an award last year because or their charitable giving.

    The majority of our franchisees came to us because they have a passion to help people. Many of them have children that had learning difficulties. They didn't just join us to start a business and make money, they joined us because we had a real answer that helped their own child.

    LearningRx has worked with over 25k students. Parents rate us a 9.3 out of 10 for the likelihood of referring their friends and family. (a top score across any industry). I understand that as we grow and help more people it's possible that a few customers leave uphappy. Just know that this is a rare exception.

    +2 Votes
  • V
      Feb 10, 2010

    As a future franchise owner, an experienced Learning Rx trainer, and cognitive skills testing administrator I can tell you that falsifying test scores is something that definitely should have been brought to the attention of the home office. I believe the testing administrator undoubtedly would have been fired, and possibly fined. As a trainer I personally witnessed my students gain self confidence, self esteem, and improved academic skills (due to stronger cognitive skills as a result of Learning Rx). I had letters sent to me from teacher's stating how proud they were of their students' gains in such a short amount of time. From D's and F's to A's and B's in just a few weeks is something we all can be proud of! All of my students and their parents will tell you it wasn't easy: the home trainer must also work just as hard as the trainer at the center in order for these results to be gained. I have seen the tears and a level of frustration like no other. I would not allow my students to say "I can't do it", "It's too hard", or "I'm stupid". I made sure each and every one of them knew they could "do it", and the end result was absolutely amazing! For me, there was an internal reward: to see the smile on their faces when they had scored an "A" or "B" on a test, when they came in to the center ready to work, and upon graduation of the program I would read a letter to them, stating top improvements (which there were many!) and I would get the "Oh, yeah, that was a piece of cake" attitude. All of my students had the guaranteed years gain, some even had scores literally off the charts!
    My background is in Psychology, I research brain cognition and neuroplasticity, and have all the faith in the world in what Learning Rx is doing for people of all ages. In my opinion, it is not necessary to have a background in Psychology or to have conducted research on brain related issues in order to be a Learning Rx owner; what is important is the passion to help others, which includes continued research in brain development and the issues surrounding learning disabilities, faith in what you believe in, integrity, and honesty.
    I thank you all for your posts, positive or negative. I hope each of you continue to research what Learning Rx has done for so many, and let the home office be made aware of such things as "falsifying test scores".

    +1 Votes
  • C
      Feb 15, 2010

    I have a 9 yr old son who has autism. Over the years the school teams have said his non-compliant behaviors have impeded his learning. However, for the last couple of years his behaviors have not been a problem but he is still basically illiterate. He has had DI with the Wilson Reading Program and more recently Horizons for the last 10 1/2 months. My husband and I are thinking he probably has learning disabilities and are looking for additional intervention. PACE (Learing Rx), IM, etc. My question: If he really cannot read, can he even participate in PACE (Learning Rx)? Would he benefit as a non-reader?

    Thank you,

    Carla

    0 Votes
  • T
      Feb 17, 2010

    LearningRx can absolutely help a non-reader. In fact, the CEO's grandson, Max, has Autism, and he went from being a non-reader (the doctors said he'd never read) to reading. Here's the link to a webinar that tells the details of his story: http://webinars.learningrx.com/index1.php. You can register for the webinar, or just watch the pre-recorded version (the link is at the bottom).

    Carla, I'm encouraged by the fact that you're still asking this question after seeing the comments on this thread. Obviously, we're sorry that anyone has a complaint - but the overwhelming majority of our graduates don't have complaints at all -- in fact, quite the opposite. Furthermore, Ms. Sowersby's complaint is inflammatory and patently false. The LearningRx program is not $5, 000 of flash cards. She's making claims that cannot be backed up, and making a straw-man out of Ms. Gory in order to defame her and defame the company. I hope readers will take this into account.

    Ms. Gory, and any of our other Directors, are perfectly qualified to do what they do, no matter their background. They are simply running a business that provides the LearningRx program, which has been proven by multiple professional tests: http://www.learningrx.com/doctors-only. Our researcher, Dr. Oliver Hill, testified to our program's legitimacy before congress at the STEM Education Hearings just last week. You can read the government record of his comments here by following the link I've provided at the end of this sentence. See page 2, paragraph 3. http://appropriations.house.gov/Witness_testimony/CJS/2011_STEM_Ed_Hearing_1_Oliver_Testimony.pdf

    One final note: If you are a trainer and you have a complaint about your center, the ethical thing to do is to contact LearningRx Corporate and get it squared away. Why, oh why, did you not contact us? Will you contact us now so that we can address this issue and make sure it does not continue? We are interested in making sure all our centers are operating above board, and an issue like what you described is grounds for serious action to be taken on our part. Dr. Gibson is a very principled and ethical person, and falsifying test results runs completely opposite to the sort of company LearningRx strives to be.

    0 Votes
  • L
      Mar 02, 2010

    I am really confused. I got a shiny advertizement in the mail, right after I discovered that my 9 year old daughter was not going to qualify for any special education in her class room unless we can get a diagnosis of ADD on her record, and even then, we are not sure. I did the quiz that came with it, on line and submitted it and sent an email inquiring about cost. I am sorry to say that I haven't really gotten a straight answer to that question. I have from the other "learning centers" I have been considering.
    I am also somewhat disappointed that I can't find any scientific studies on Learning RX, that give statistics. I think I would be more confident if the advertisement wasn't so shiny, if the emails were more information and less advertisement and if I could get personalized answers that were not simply "check our website". My husband and I are almost through climbing out of a mountain of debt and not anxious to build another one. I just want to make the right decision for my daughter. I found the initial complaint very offensive, but was unnerved by others.

    +1 Votes
  • L
      Apr 10, 2010

    Hmmm...what was the initial complaint? I just read through 4+ years of comments. As a public school teacher of students with learning disabilities, I struggle to be allowed to provide some of the educational lessons and activities that I see children need because they do not fit into the paradigm of current educational trends. When I had nothing but a college degree and a few years of experience, my LD students made minor gains, no different from those they had made for other years. After I received training in Orton-Gillingham strategies and thinking through visualizing (all part-to-whole) strategies, I started seeing HUGE gains in some students, particularly those with home support; not all students, because not all students are part-to-whole thinkers. I also definitely agree that the rapport between the student & trainer is as important as the program. That includes parents teaching their own children. You aren't going to get anywhere with a kid who just wants to go play video games when you're done, and one-on-one with a private tutor is the way to go. If you are paying high dollar for small group instruction, you are getting ripped off. Also, no one can promise you that after a certain number of sessions, your child will gain a certain number of grade levels. Having said that, I don't know Learning Rx or PACE, and I am very interested in working at a job where I can see what a child needs and actually be allowed to deliver it.

    +1 Votes
  • T
      Apr 11, 2010

    THIS IS TRUTHBETOLD ---- I WANT TO BE CLEAR THAT I HAVE SPOKEN DIRECTLY TO KEN GIBSON AND ROBIN GIBSON ABOUT ALL OF THIS... More on their response below-

    I began working at a LearningRx branch from its conception and climbed the ranks into management within the first year. I ran a group of 9 trainers... Again, the trainers and their relationships are real, and changes CAN be seen but again...

    Test scores are adulterated
    People are exploited for money

    After working in management and still training students myself i was at some point asked to learn how to administer the woodcock Johnson cognitive achievement testing/... A testing i am certainly not qualified to do...

    I was asked to conduct interviews in which racial selection was emphasized

    asked to fire people based on petty social indifference, basically, the owners just didn't like them and for the most part this was because the owner/ director of this center wanted a staff of friends and not employees...

    She manipulated me throughout making me feel as if my position as director of training was contingent on things such as making copies and tying bows onto wedding invitations sometimes even while a student of mine would be waiting to start our scheduled session... Many times parents complained about not starting on time consistently which was always disregarded by the owner scoffed at actually...

    However when i was taught to score the tests within the computer system i was reprimanded when satisfactory results were handed in as NO PARENT WOULD SIGN UP IF THE TEST LOOKS LIKE THAT...

    I tried to quietly resign and told them i would finish out my students who i had obligations with and continued to do so while the working atmosphere was becoming very hostile and i was yelled at in front of clients as it was clearly visible through the glass doors to the Owners office.

    I was taken off of my direct deposit but was assured i would recieve my checks on time... In the end i did not recieve my final pay as i was fired from my position with 3 hours left in my last students program.

    Because of this i was told by the financial officer ( Also the owner's Husband who i have email and text message confirmation of his promising to pay me)- I owed THEM money for breaking contract and not fulfilling my obligations as a trainer by finishing my student. So until i can pay them back i would not be paid the check that WAS ISSUED from the payroll company and withheld from me!

    Again i was purposely fired 3 hours, 2 sessions away from my final graduation...

    I still have wonderful references from parents of children i worked with and continue communication with them.

    I WANT THIS TO BE CLEAR TO ANY LEARNINGRX STAFF THAT IS DEFENDING THIS COMPANY

    _ I Have spoken PERSONALLY to KEN GIBSON himself as well as ROBIN GIBSON ( Who himself chose me as the center's Director-of training, during our first corporate visit at the center.) And neither of them were willing to do anything. They told me i can pursue any direction i need to but other than a corporate name they cannot be held accountable or responsible for the actions of the center.

    WHAT!!!???!!! Even a Dominos pizza will get shut down if the crust i'snt right consistently...

    I CHALLENGE THE OWNERS OF THIS COMPANY TO MAKE A STATEMENT REGARDING THIS- AS WAS TOLD TO THEM BEFORE, I HAVE PROOF- COPIES OF TESTS WITH RADICALLY DIFFERENT SCORES THAN THE ONES RECEIVED BY THE PARENTS AT GRADUATION AND IF YOU ARE WILLING TO CHALLENGE THAT I HAVE THE CONTACT INFORMATION OF THE PARENT WHO IM SURE WOULD BE VERY UPSET AT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HIS TEST RESULTS AND THE ORIGINAL RESULTS THAT I HAVE.

    I CAN VERIFY ANY OF THIS INFORMATION 100% - THIS IS NOT THE ROUTE I WANTED TO TAKE, ACTUALLY THIS IS THE ROUTE I WAS TOLD TO TAKE BY KEN AND ROBIN GIBSON THE OWNERS OF THIS FRANCHISE


    IF anyone wants further information regarding this, especially families considering going to LRX, please leave an email address here i can contact you at...

    I have somewhat tried to not identify myself howwever parties involved will know who i am. Any attacks on me personally
    regarding this or anything else will be 100% prosecuted. After years of dedication I was treated with disrespect unlike any i have ever experienced and probably ever will...

    Good luck to everyone struggling with children with Learning dissabilites, there is hope out there, play brain games, be consistent, set goals, be motivational, YOU can make a difference in their lives!

    I apologize for the grammar and lack of capital I's in this post, i was typing quickly and with passion

    +1 Votes
  • B
      Apr 14, 2010

    I am a high-functioning adult with ADHD issues. I had a number of accentuated problems when I was younger.

    I score better in math and English than most others, but in a pool of my graduate level peers, misconstrue the main points of an essay topic and misfire when solving certain math problems.

    Being that I already am at a high-level of ability, can Learning RX even benefit me? I've spoken to a LearningRX center (who of course sound hopefully expectant) but I remain dubious.

    I would greatly appreciate any information that can be forwarded on. Despite its costs, I am sure the program can benefit some children, and adults. I just don't know if the program can reasonably benefit me.

    Respectfully, Brent

    spudhalvorson @ yahoo.com

    +1 Votes
  • L
      Apr 28, 2010

    My wife and I are meeting with a center in Mn. As a parent and former Police officer it is not only my responsibility to ensure the validity of the program, it's in my training in my blood. It is not yet clear to me about the fact's surrounding the past studies as well as other negative comment's. What I do know at this point is, it does cost about $1000 a month. The actual processes surrounding the learning, techniques, materials and concepts I have see are very encouraging. The offer for facts regarding credible complaints is welcomed and appreciated. As a parent I wish the best for my children and have expectations to receive more than less in and with an investment such as this. It is hard to have credibility without the fact's. The more outrageous the accusations sound, the more the burden of proof lies with the accuser.

    [protected]@gmail.com

    0 Votes
  • M
      May 24, 2010

    Well I was ready to take my 7 year old to the LearningRX in Buchhead, GA. in a few days, but now I am not so sure.
    He is bright but has inattentive ADHD and has trouble focusing in a noisy classroom. If you are a parent and have had any experience with this location or any of their trainers, please let me know.

    0 Votes
  • L
      May 25, 2010

    Motherof7yearold,

    My daughter is very excited and comes home teaching her siblings what she has been doing in the training. I have been at every training in the back ground, listening. I see a confidence about learning in her and she is reading and writing better. We have definitely seen an improvement, she is not embarrassed about what she doesn't know and tries to figure it out. I have trained men for combat, been a cop and now moved on to writing. The process makes sense. It only takes an hour and it seems to fly by. We have seen a difference. It builds on the brain's abilities to create new pathways for functional learning, that's my explanation. With proper conditioning and nutrition and a strong commitment to help your child I believe you will see an improvement. They match your child with a trainer, as with anything your the parent so stay on top of thing's. it's a six month training so I have committed my mind set and time to make it work. My kids are worth it, I'm sure you feel the same way.

    Ask question's, try a few of the methods with the director and get a feel for the material I think you will see your own weakness and be challenged to learn more.. I was talking to the wife and thought the process could help adult's just as easily.

    Good luck,

    LawJoc

    0 Votes
  • E
      May 28, 2010

    I am interested in getting in contact with TruthBeTold as I decide where to take a new brain training program - please contact me at [protected]@hotmail.com

    0 Votes
  • T
      Jun 01, 2010

    I’ve questioned Dr. Gibson regarding the accusations of thetruthbetold and here is his response:

    “I do remember a trainer accusing one center owner of modifying test results but have never seen any evidence to support the accusation. When the owner was questioned about it – they denied it and indicated that the accusation came from a disgruntled former staff. Without evidence there was nothing we could do but watch that center closely – which we did. Since then, other types of ethical accusation have come up about that owner which were investigated and some proved true. That owner is no longer a LearningRx Franchise owner.”

    0 Votes
  • M
      Jun 18, 2010

    Dear Motherof7yearoldboy:

    Have you taken your son to the Buckhead Center? If so, how was it? How much did it cost? Would you recommend it?

    Thanks,
    Momof9yearoldboy

    0 Votes
  • M
      Jul 17, 2010

    I am sure the program can benefit your child if you have $5000 to risk. Learning RX is playing on parents' emotions. Shame on you Learning RX!! I really don't know how the people who work for them sleep at night.

    0 Votes
  • P
      Sep 21, 2010

    When I get a come on from a company like this, the first thing I do is google for reviews. Complaints are particularly useful because they tend to be more specific than compliments. That doesn't mean I necessarily think they are valid, but it still helps to see them. To give an example of a review I recently thought was not fair; a reviewer gave a dvd the lowest possible score because it didn't include features for hearing impaired people (the product was not about hearing or any sort of impairment). I can sympathize with a person's frustration ( and did in that case) but not with an 'it's all about me' attitude.

    It also helps to read the text in the worst possible light. Keep in mind that they are being as positive as humanly possible - your job is to bring the balance back to the truth. Be a cynic. Read between the lines. For example, the website for this company stresses that they are 'professionals'. Do you know what professional means? It means a person gets paid for what they do. Click on their franchise opportunity tab. This one says it will send you a LearningRx Franchise Info Kit, and that this is what it contains (taken directly from their website):

    LearningRx Franchise Info Kit
    The LearningRx Franchise Info Kit includes:

    * An Educational Franchise Comparison Chart including royalties, growth rate, and product results
    * Estimated Initial investment Chart
    * How Much You Can Make, detailed information on revenues and expenses of operating a center
    * Top Franchise Performer Profiles, get actual profiles of top performers and see how you measure up

    Nowhere does it mention what they require from their franchise owners, and I'm willing to bet that that is because they require nothing but cash. I bet that at most they require a background check to make sure applicants aren't registered sex offenders.

    I learned all this the hard way. I had my child in a Primrose Center when he was three. Kind but not terribly knowledgeable teacher - hideous owners who lied and whose approach to the 'educaton' and social skills they promised consisted of all you can eat candy and sitting kids in front of junk videos. I wasn't looking for preschool college prep, but I did want an environment that encouraged exploration and fostered good social skills, and I paid for that - not ghetto level babysitting. Then I stumbled onto a Primrose ad for franchise owners. It said in bold face "No experience necessary" - exactly the opposite of what their ads aimed at parent said. Now, when I see ads that prey on naive parents I just can't help going to look at their franchise and employee want ads - if it says money money money and no discussion of what is expected, that tells me all I need to know.

    The original poster on this company complained that her director was a former hair dresser. That in itself is not a problem (there is good documentation that the best teachers had a different career first) but it does raise questions. I would want to know what took place between the stint as a hairdresser and the one as a teacher. I was a successful fashion designer who retired when I saw my son was going to have problems in school. I studied his condition intensely (about 60 hours a week) for 10 years. I now know more about it than virtually any 'professional' on the planet. I now have more respect for dedicated non-professionals in any discipline than 99% of the professionals. It isn't just dedication - it's also limitation. One example of limitation: medical professionals are limited because pharmaceutical companies sponsor med schools, which neglect to teach nutrition because of it, . Similar things happen in education.

    Another example: Back in the 40's a violent reform school ( they;'d had 3 murders in one year) was itself reformed by a man who replaced the punish system with one based on rewards. It worked so well that it went viral, as we say now. Schools of all sorts all over the country tried it - still do - and it failed miserably. The missing element was that no one else truly understood and believed in it to the degree the originator did. My son was a victim of this system in kindergarten. They used a star system, and every morning he was yanked out of my car and asked " hey, are you going to 'stay on your star today?" Imagine my horror when I learned that the inventor of this horrible practice was my very own perfect grandfather. I stumbled on this while researching education. He did so well at running that reform school that he was chosen to run a displaced person's camp in Austria after WW2. He understood true discipline - self discipline - and inspired it in thousands of children throughout his life, by giving them incentives they were willing to work towards.

    The originators of this system may have had great success with it, and they may have built a reputation on it, but history repeatedly shows that success is not in a program but in the implementation. Because great teachers can not be cloned, terrific programs can't be either. Montessorri after Maria *and* after her time period (also a factor) was never again Montessorri and Learning Rx is never going to be the same from one school to another.

    Moral to the story - don't buy into franchises - find someone you respect and hire them directly.

    0 Votes
  • A
      Sep 24, 2010

    To Poupon: I think you made a great argument as to the pros and cons of such systems and the evolution of branch schools from the founding original. I just have one comment/complaint regarding your posting (which is tangential to the primary argument). You stated "medical professionals are limited because pharmaceutical companies sponsor med schools." I am an MD, and I must dispute this comment. Medical schools are not "sponsored" by pharmaceutical companies. Even when I was doing my clinical rotations, there was a policy prohibiting any goods or services from pharmaceutical companies. Unlike many private doctors' offices or some other schools/programs, we did not have drug company-sponsored "lunch and learns" (where they provide free food in exchange for their propaganda), we did not receive pharmaceutical trinkets (pens, etc.), and we did not even receive free drug samples. Granted, not all medical programs are like mine, but I certainly do not know of "pharmaceutical companies sponsor[ing] med schools." Aside from this, I do appreciate your other comments and observations.

    0 Votes
  • P
      Sep 24, 2010

    Thankyou, amm-m, for responding to my post. A bit of background - For 20 years I've seen every possible type of doctor for steadily worsening atril fibrillation ( not just cardiologists but endocrinologists etc). Not one has ever once mentioned minerals, even though my medical history mentions migraines and other disorders that could be also caused by a mineral deficiency. After over a dozen relatives with the same medical history told me they have never had a doctor mention minerals - or any other nutritional supplement either, I began to wonder why this was so. This summer, I spent a week in the hospital tanslating for my hearing impaired FIL and then two months of daily doctor's appointments for one or another member of my family or myself. I was astonished byy the parade of pharmaceutical sales reps I saw - often more than there were patients in the waiting room, I put two and two together and then asked - first my gp and then my dentist. I expected to get an evasive response, so I was surprised when both went on rants about this. My GP said it's not only true, but it has ruined (especially) endocrinology and cardiology because those fields attract doctors who "only want to do thyroid surgery and heart procedures and can get away with writing prescriptions instead of trying to really help the patient." FWIW, because of where live, a small majority of doctors we see went to Emory, but I've had the same experience no matter where they went. Emory, BTW is considered to be as good as it gets for electrophysiology (meaning they do a lot of pacemakers).

    I don't know the ethics rules of med schools, but if there are any, a blind man could see they aren't honored, any more than rules about recruiting athletes are honored by colleges. In that case, when they had to stop paying money, they bough cars, When they had to stop buying cars, they built vanity museums. It has to be widespread - otherwise, why don't doctors address root causes? Why do they virtually never mention how a patient can use nutrients to help themselves, or test to make sure the ones they take in are getting utilized ( not just showing in the blood, but actually getting where it needs to go)?

    I know this is not relevant to the discussion, but it is relevant to learning disabilities, and cold certainly help others who read this. My AF began with migraines - which my dd also had. Those were caused by a magnesium deficiency and they in turn caused letter reversals and a very quirky math disability. In my case, because it was not understood, it was assumed my on again, off again LDs were behavioral and on the advice of the school, I was punished for years for them - grounded, and ability tracked at the lowest level instead of the highest, where tests showed I belonged.

    I'm really curious where you went to med school, and if you got any training in nutrition - and if you use it or find it isn't a fit with the way you practice medicine. If you indeed went to a school that valued a complete education, then I will go out of my way to choose physicians who attended the same school.

    Thanks!

    0 Votes
  • J
      Oct 05, 2010

    Any one who willing to give these people $5000 to $10, 000 to teach their kids how to behave is stupid enough to join!

    0 Votes
  • P
      Oct 05, 2010

    James HD,

    You're so entrenched in the pompous philosophy that any ill can be beaten out of a child that your post doesn't really merit a response, but I'm feeling generous - not towards you but towards your unfortunate children. Did you ever care for a sick baby? I mean really and truly care for them - not take a turn rocking them when fever kept them from sleeping, but be the person who had to problem solve? Nah, didn't think so. If you had, you'd know that when a child is distressed every effort you make to get them to pull themselves up by their boot straps makes matters worse. The same goes for a distressed older child. You have to stop, regroup, and try a gentler approach. Note, I did NOT say give in to tantrums. I said try a different approach ( toward the same goal).

    I had a child who was born uncomfortable. He was sensitive to noises, tags in his clothes, and most of all heights. That last one threw me for a loop, when at age 7 he told me. For years he'd been climbing everything in sight, how could it be? Because his nature was to defy his discomfort. This was a child who, even more than other children, did not want to be uncomfortable - was willing to face it down. But, he could not. Because he had very advanced milestones (a pediatricians measurement of neurological wellness - does he walk, talk, sit up at about the same age as his peers?). pediatricians ( 50 of them in all) kept insisting nothing was wrong. he was nine, when I learned from a mom of a very delayed child what was going on. Kids with extreme milestones on either end of the spectrum have an imbalance in their sensory system. It was called Sensory Integration Dysfunction. Not one doctor I took him to was familiar with it - except (then) with children who had Downs. Now every one who deals with autism knows it. Kids who simply have very high IQ's also get it, but it is virtually never diagnosed unless they also have Aspergers ( mine doesn't - mine is, highly social).

    Because he often got sensory overload, he had trouble coping with social situations where kids can be unpredictable - indeed, he could not deal with anything unpredictable. Plus, sensory integration dysfunction is the root cause of most learning disabilities. That is why the kids who 'misbehave' in school are often also the ones who have LD's. That and kids with either of the two are very often abused by people who think like you. So much so that the best book on the subject is titled "When Children Invite Child Abuse".

    Sometimes when he was early school age, people would tell me I'm a terrible mother, based on my son's behavior. I'd point to his sister and say "Explain her then." and their mouths would drop and they'd look embarrassed. My daughter, who had some SID of her own, but which manifested differently, was one of those overly good children that people call little adults. Lucky me - I got one of each. Every time we headed anywhere, I would give my kids these instructions: Son, don't be the brightest bulb in the room. Look for whomever is and shine just a little less than him. And Daughter, shine as brightly as you can. Be fearless. Dance on the table tops. "

    Today they are 19 and 15. My son is in college ( homeschooled all the way through because of teachers who thought like you). He is an Eagle Scout, but not just an Eagle - he chose a forgotten art, researched it, taught his crew how to do it and made that object for a museum. It was originally intended to use as a teaching artifact but due to the complexity and rarity of it, it has instead taken a place of honor under glass in the main gallery. Eagle projects are supposed to take about 100 hours - his took over 400. This is a kid who is earnest about everything he does - or he doesn't do it. He has taught all sorts of waterfront activities, where children's lives were in his hands. He has taught the highest level BSA leadership programs. He has done surgery on a rooster after a vet wrote it off ( 18 months and still crowing) . He's a professionally rated musician and has won writing and vocabulary contests. He speaks Japanese. This summer, he used his wilderness first aid training to do first aid on a goat with a punctured lung. The goat had been attacked by a 250 pound bear. Which brings me to the down side - he will always be a risk taker (he ran right past the bear to grab the goat) who gets too rowdy and who leaves his most valuable items lying around where they can ( and regularly do) get stolen. If you read the biographies of Einstein and Edison and many others, you will see very similar profiles - people who were called '[censor]ed( so was my son) in school and are considered incorrigible by people who don't know Jack. People like this can and do grow into extraordinary adults, unless they are destroyed by [censor]s.

    My daughter is as 'normal' a teenager as they come - no sign of any SID now. That is because by the time she came along I had an inkling of what was going on and how to help from the day she came home from the hospital ( they said she was slow to warm so I set about warming her up). She was extremely shy - now she's anything but. She's still mature for her age ( and so is a good student who has taken no interest in sex, drugs and fast cars) . Because of early intervention and a parent who saw that she had something more than 'behavioral issues', she was able to escape SID with all the good and none of the bad. Too bad the world was so full of idiots when my son was born. He will have to balance the good with the bad his entire life.

    Think about it.

    The people who spend that money are desperate . Perhaps they are less motivated than I was but in fairness to them, I had no choice but to be motivated. The only options available to me were in classes with kids who had full blown autism - they would not have met his needs at all.

    0 Votes
  • J
      Oct 05, 2010

    to Motherof7yearoldboy,
    Dont waste your money on this nonsense program. Stop feeding your son sweets and sugars and he'll do just fine.

    0 Votes
  • P
      Oct 05, 2010

    James HD - you've climbed out of the primordial ooze of your last comment to acknowledge sugar can be a factor. Bravo, but it is only one of thousands of things that can affect behavior. The brain is so much more complex than you give it credit for.

    Not every hyper child is sensitive to sugar. But, many are. and absolutely, that should be considered. My son had one who was sugar allergic on his Eagle crew. His mom thought her mission in life was to to bring greasy sweets to every event and send literally a trunk full of candy along on week long camping trips. Nothing could deter her ( the scoutmaster and several leaders tried). The poor kid was made to haul water for days just to keep him out of trouble. But, he showed up to the first crew day with his head on straight. I asked him what he had for breakfast. He said potstickers. I asked him to have that every word day, He agreed, and quickly became a lead crew member. I went to his dad and told him how terrific he was and the agreement we had regarding his diet while on the job. He slowly shook his head up and down as if he finally comprehended what everyone but his wife had said for 14 years. I have goosebumps as I write that his own Eagle project proposal has just been approved. Obviously the sugar druglord has been overthrown

    0 Votes
  • P
      Oct 05, 2010

    Mother of a 7 year old - your description warrants an immediate evaluation by an occupational therapist. Sensitivity to noise is a symptom of Sensory Integration Dysfunction. This is a developmental disorder, meaning that it is not something to wait another day on. He would ideally have been treated before the age of four. You can google it - you will find it associated with autism. That is only because autism groups have very strong lobbiests and support groups. It can happen to anyone ( we're ALL on the spectrum somewhere. But, it happens most often to kids at either end of the IQ spectrum. You don't say how bright he is ( just bright can mean a hair above average or a genius) but the higher (or lower) his IQ, the more likely he is to suffer from this. If he has any unusual social habits, is a picky ( or overly indiscriminate) eater, is more ( or less) visually aware than others, notices smells more ( or less) than usual, and if he has tactile quirks - dislikes seams in his socks or tags in his clothes ( or conversely, fails to notice he's bleeding or bruised), then this is absolutely positively, NOT ADHD. It's SID.

    I'm so sure this is what your kid has, I'll even make you a little bet. I bet your kid has bad handwriting, and is reluctant to try. Again - not an ADHD trait, and a pox on anyone who says it is, professional of not. It's called gravitational insecurity and is caused by SID .

    I live near you - you can contact me if you want a referral or more explanation.

    0 Votes
  • F
      Dec 10, 2010

    Learning Rx is a franchise. Sometimes you will find a particular location that does not conform to the ideal.

    When we were considering Learning Rx for our 2 children, we spent time checking it out in many different ways. We looked at what information was available on line and talked to the owners. The most important thing we did was talk to parents of children who had been through the program at that particular franchise and to parents whose children were currently in the program. Everyone was very positive about the outcomes and there were a few who had enrolled a second child after seeing the results for their first child.

    I am quite sure, as one poster stated, that we could do a lot of the same kind of training on our own. However, I'm sure that many parents will agree that their children respond better when it is someone other than Mom or Dad telling them they need to do something. In our case, we opted not to do the partner program for that very reason. We are about a third of the way through the program and are happy with the results so far.

    I urge you not to paint every franchise with the same brush merely because one franchise does not live up to your standards. Check out your local center and make your decision based on what you find out there.

    I

    0 Votes
  • P
      Dec 16, 2010

    Has anyone had any experience with Learning Rx center in San Antonio off stone oak pkwy? I'm 30 and thinking about going through with this program. I've done the evaluation test and met with who I believe was the director. They paint a pretty picture about how much the program can help. I'm a natural born skeptic. Doesnt mean I'm close minded to the program though.

    Ive never done well at school. Never bothered going onto to college because I thought it would have been a waste of money and time. Have poor attention skills. My long term memory is horrendous among other things. Guess I'm like a lot of people on this site. For the amount of money i'm going to shell out, i'm nervous about it. I'm willing to to do the work asked of me. I would love to go to college and get a degree and stop working at dead end jobs. If there is anyone close to my age or area that has been through this program, can you give me your insight please.

    0 Votes
  • S
      Dec 25, 2010

    Pabo45
    I too am getting close to signing my 8 yr old up for the program in San Antonio, TX . He does not have ADHD or any thing like that...he does pretty well in school just struggles with reading comp and gets frustrated lots especially when his teachers speaks of things they have done in the past and that HE "should" remember...Unfortunetly I too think he has picked up a gene of mine and I have struggled with memory and comprehension etc...for MANY years and could only dream that someone would have provided me with help so that all the past years would not have been so frustrating etc...His teacher recently said to me...he is in trouble if he ever gets a teacher that doesn't have patience:( that makes me sad! Above they mentioned paying 5000$...I was quoted $9175.00 hmmmmm that is much more...that would be them doing all the training...I know I could not and can not help him with this sense I struggle with the whole thing. We are trying to find out if we can use 529 account money and then just pay that back over time for college time...instead of paying any interest to borrow the funds...scarrrrrrrrrrrrryyyyyyyyyyy...

    0 Votes
  • P
      Feb 09, 2011

    Hi,
    We live in Albuquerque NM and are looking into the center here. Has anyone used this facility and have any comments about it? Also wondering if anyone knows this: does LRX ever turn people down for their services? I mean are there people who don't fit their profile for need of their services? We asked this question and the answer we got was that it had happened once and it was an "anomaly". Isn't it strange that having someone who doesn't need their services is unusual.
    Would appreciate comments.

    0 Votes
  • A
      Feb 13, 2011

    In response to the earlier post regarding turned down clients... Yes, LearningRx has turned down potential students because at times, cognitive training is not what the child needs. Several reasons include behavioral issues that stem not from cognitively induced frustration, but from other variables in the chills life, including environmental, family or medically related issues. Another reason a child might not be good fit for the programs would be that the Childs issues are relatively confined to a curriculum issue, where traditional tutoring would be a better resource. In addition, a child or adult must have a certain level of cognition to do the procedures, if this minimal threshold cannot be met on either day 1 or within a reasonable amount of time (as defined by both parent and director) then the child should be referred to a resource better suited for that level of cognition. I am the owner of a LearningRx center and came to know the company because of my sons learning issues. I was skeptical at first when I read the stories of success. I was being told by all people involved in diagnosing and 'helping' my child including teachers, behavioral psychologist, audiologist, and speech therapist, that my sons issues could not be 'fixed' but rather the goal was to create an accommodative environment were he could reasonably succeed. Also, I was told to simply accept his abilities. This was after spending $2500 on testing, which produced a 14 page single spaced report that outlined the tests done, and on the ver last 2 pages, what he had and what accommodations were necessary for him in the classroom. These included, Etta time for tests, a quiet environment for testing and school work, one instruction at a time, direct eye contact when giving instructions, an fm system in the classroom so the teachers voice could be easily heard and a few more. Anyway needless to say, I was not going to accept this mediocracy as my sons future. I found out about LearningRx as a fluke. Long story short, after completing the program, my son has been doing amazing, he is confident, has straight A's, and is being considered for gifted programs. He no longer needs any of the accommodations listed in the report. Since opening our center several years ago we have not only helped our son, but hundreds of other families and children. We are constantly asked 'Why is this not in our schools?' or similar questions.
    As far as the earlier comments regarding altering test results, or other seemingly negative experiences by people, all I can say, is that if those instances are true, it is very disappointing. But those experiences etc represent isolated incidents and are not the norm. The LearningRx center owners are very dedicated to helping children and truly care about providing the best service and outcomes for the children. I have a director who is amazingly qualified that runs our center and speaks to parents, schools, and a myriad of medical practices about our programs. Just like in any profession, (even schools, and medically related professions) there are unfortunately some bad apples, but you cannot judge the entire system simply from these experiences.
    In short, I strongly recommend any parent to check out LearningRx and have their child assessed. The experience should be very insightful into your Childs cognitive abilities. Make up your own mind about whether the programs are right for your child. I would also recommend talking to the parents at are in the lobby and asking for parent references for students that may be similar in age to your. I cannot stress what an amazing change change this made for our son and I attribute 100 percent of his academic success to LearningRx. I found a solution for my sons learning issues, that went against traditional opinion and frankly against the established norms as dictated by professionals.

    0 Votes

Post your comment