The complaint has been investigated and
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B

Myself and a very good friend of mine were talked into signing up for FHTM Canada on the good word of a close friend of mine who was suppose to be our "Sponsor", the only thing is that I found out that she wasn't a very good friend at all, she only had $$$$$ signs in her eyes. Needless to say we unwittingly signed up and had our friends and family sign up only to be left in the dust, scratching our heads saying "what just happened here"? Why isn't anything happening to our team, when we were promised time after time by our "Sponsor" that she would indeed work with us to build our team and told the elderly ladies that she would "build their team for them" NOT TO WORRY. When we started questioning our "Sponsor" she left town never to be seen again, isn't that interesting? Anyway we all ended up dropping out of this great business after never receiving any type of guidance only empty promises and lies. By the way if you are a FHTM Rep in Canada, there isn't a head office in Canada even though they lead you to believe this. And please make sure you read the 35 page policy manual especially the fine print (Scary). We are in the process of trying to recoup some of our losses with FHTM as we feel we mislead our friends and family as they trusted us and we let them down.

Responses

  • Sk
    Skapegoat May 21, 2013

    These doucebags have been shut down by the FTC and soon Orberson & Mills will be heading to the federal pen.

    0 Votes
  • Ke
    keandra Dec 15, 2012
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    In a way the idea is good
    But i find it too expensive to run and not everyone need those services; so it is kind of restrictive.
    You are kind of constrained to use only the services on the website, instead of going out in the market and look for a lower competitive price
    And the only way you get money is through recruitment. You get back about a dollar from the monthly service bill
    Also the training is about nagging you friends...instead of looking for a target market
    The only way to make money is to look for higher income individual that can keep up with the additional fees
    And it is also difficult to sell
    I find it cheaper to go straight to the market and not get anything back..
    than to spend $50 more to get a dollar back
    If you like this...go for it
    But don't join because of money alone...
    Business is all about service and helping people solve problems. If you don't learn that, it will be difficult to succeed
    So ask yourself why you are interested...and make sure it's your passion
    There are a lot of mlm out today...do your search

    0 Votes
  • He
    Heliosvector Nov 04, 2012
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    wow @trust no one do your [email protected]
    Im sorry to hear that you have had such bad luck. I know in my group We NEVER say it costs nothing. whenever i bring someone into the company, i tell them the costs upfront but i also tell them the benefits. IF they dont even recruit anyone, they get tax discounts that are good on their own. 100% off of cell phone bill. my phone bill wax about 90 a month with tax. over a year thats 180 less in taxes and then 50% off meals where the business is discussed, flights and gas.
    What i did was bought daily contacts that came to 31 dollars a month. i spend more than that normally and then taxbot.
    with tax write offs i got an extra 800 dollars back at the end of the year
    299+20(taxbot)*12= 539.
    I dont take the contacts into account because i buy them already but to each his own. ANYWAYS. without recruiting or selling you make a very small but worth it profit. I feel bad for all the people that fail and quit. Perhaps they dont have an as supportive group as me, but if you think you can just give someone money and expect them to make it work for you, you are sadly mistaken.

    0 Votes
  • Tr
    Trust no one, do your homework Apr 14, 2012
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Besides it being a pyramid scheme! The Thing that pisses me off is, they tell you to watch a webaneer/video and the entire thing says it cost YOU nothing. Pay nothing . But then you go to the become a Representative and you have to give all your personal info before you can read the Representative's contract which( if you don't read it screws you over) it then states you have to buy a starter kit and purchases ALL the products you wish to sell and you will get reimbursed from the company once the person you sell it too makes a payment.. If I was going to buy the products before hand then I sure as hell don't need them to hold them for me..I could go to the store buy the item and then turn around and sell it to the interested party at 2% increase in retail price and make my own commissions!!! IT"s A BULL ### Business and these kinds of places need to be taken out of business..they take advantage of people trying to survive and more of them pop up everyday because our country's economy is so crappy..They are vultures Praying on people who are afraid because they've lost their jobs etc..

    0 Votes
  • Jm
    jmho Feb 26, 2012
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    "Your job is a pyramid. Look at your President, Vice President, Upper management, Lower management, your supervisor all the way down to the workers. Where do you fall in that cast of characters? If you think about it every single thing in life is network marketing. Put it this way the food you ate this morning was grown by a farmer. He priced it up and sold it to a wholesaler. He marked it up and sold it to a national retailer. He sold it to National wholesaler retailer. They shipped it to your city. They put it in the warehouse and marked it up some more. The warehouse marked it up some more and put it in local stores. The local stores marked it up and you came along and bought that steak or fruit or whatever you had for lunch or for dinner. It’s been sold 8 or 9 times before it hit your juicy lips. And you have enough nerve to call this a pyramid deal"

    Sorry, this is the oldest MLM / pyramid scam line in the book. You talk about being brainwashed and not to believe everything you read, and yet here you are being brainwashed and believing everything you hear & read from FHTM. I've heard this exact same thing 25 yrs ago with Amway, another one called World Wide ?Dreambuilders? that was a mix of Amway, and what sounds a lot like this FHTM, doesn't matter, they ALL say this exact same thing. Make money by using products and/or services you already use, "own" your own business, be your "own" boss, and make "own" hours. These are key phrases EVERY SINGLE MLM company uses. You still need to put in the time and effort to make the money. The more time & effort you put into it, the more money you will make... true. You will be working the exact same hours as your "regular" job, maybe even more, and no guarantee of making the exact same salary as you once earned with a "regular" job, especially if you suck at it. Let's face it, this is NOT for everyone. I knew someone in Amway who always said "Some will, some won't, so what". But then would go on & on about how great he was because he did, and how stupid were those who didn't sign up. Bully tactic? I think so. The "some" of us that "won't" don't see it that way. I'll bet there are those in FHTM who say the exact same thing, maybe even the same guy, LOL! And if you are looking to open up your evenings & weekends so you have more free time with your family, forget it. Evenings & weekends are when all the seminars & meetings are. Also, those who will take the time to listen to you will only do so on evenings & weekends. Sorry, but I don't want to spend my whole entire day cold-calling, and spend my whole entire evening recruiting and my weekend at seminars. It's not for me, and that's fine by me, I don't see it as being brainwashed or being stupid passing up an opportunity. And if you like what you see & hear & go for it, then please, do not have that crap "holier than thou" attitude, just be happy in your own choice.

    0 Votes
  • Ra
    RaymondW Jan 21, 2012

    Since my last post, Texas forced FHTM to pay $1.5 million in refunds to consumers back in November and another $200, 000 to Texas A.G. for attorney fees, expenses and investigative cost . What is up with all these States FHTM was in trouble with? That makes three States FHTM had to pay up for allegations that it was operating like an illegal pyramid scheme. Each time FHTM's hands are forced to change the design of their pay-plan and marketing methods. Montana was a real eye opener on the truth. If things wasn't bad enough with State investigations, the FTC still has FHTM on their list called Operation Empty Promises. Then North Carolina Attorney General has an investigation ongoing. I don't know about you all, but there is way too many red flags, enough red flags to warn consumers to hold on to their money and friends. There are still two pending class action lawsuits and an individual lawsuit. The class action lawsuits consist of several consumers from different States who feel FHTM is a pyramid scheme and that FHTM has lied about many things, all which is available to read online for free. I highly encourage someone doing their research to read the class action lawsuits to know the truth. The individual lawsuit is about someone who was terminated because they was involved in another MLM to make money from home. The income they was making in FHTM went down, like it has for so many involved. Again, that lawsuit is online free to read as well. In fact you can find all the troubles FHTM is in at http://www.fhtmscamnews.com/ All the info on that site are linked to reliable sources. You can also view some videos on that site. Also review FHTM's income disclosure statement. It will show that 95% of those will make far less than someone who could be working a second job making below minimum wage. The IDS excludes the 30% that made nothing with FHTM and the months reps didn't earn a check. Talk about trying to hide the facts. They don't want you to know what the real numbers are, they don't even include the actual number of reps for each level. What are they hiding? Red Flag!

    0 Votes
  • Ra
    Rach29990 Nov 01, 2011

    FHTM is a network company like any company ex. Monavie, isagenix, Mary Kay etc.
    There is no guarantee success in the company it is solely by an individual's effort is how you will see the results. Just like one buying a gym pass isn't guaranteed too see results it is all done solely by the individual. A student in school isn't guaranteed to be an honor student it is solely done by the individual's efforts. Network marketing I s the way to go but isn't for everyone. FHTM has beat the 10 year mark and is growing more then ever. I am sorry if you did not see the results you wanted and feel the need to call it a scam. No business grows over night and hope you all know that.

    0 Votes
  • Ml
    MLM Truth Sep 12, 2011

    It appears to me that the world is filled with negative, pessimistic and nagging people who make up the majority (97%) of the population today who complain, nag and whine and have critical things to say in tearing down the credibility of businesses in the MLM industry and then profess to speak the “Truth”. Opinions that are visibly bias are never truth. It’s preposterous to think that such post and comments hold any validity of truth whatsoever. What is obvious to me in reading through ALL of the post on this site as there are many is that those who FAILED with FHTM and are ex representatives of the company who hold a grudge now because of their apparent failure, have found a place to vent their anger. People ARE succeeding with FHTM whether others failed, got scammed, lost out, and whatever EXCUSE people have accepted and convinced themselves to believe. If people are succeeding and others failed, it’s time to look in the mirror and realize who didn’t have what it took to make it. People blame the weather, the government, their spouse, their boss, their neighbor, their relatives, ANYTHING but themselves! In a world filled with an entitlement mentality, it amazes me that irregardless of what company you Google online, there is ALWAYS naysayers and sites like this filled with people who blame companies and others for their lack of success. Self Responsibility is a dying trend in this world. Blaming others is the only way for people to apparently feel good about themselves. But technically if anyone is ever scammed in dealing with any opportunity, it simply means they were not smart enough to diligently pick something they could succeed at knowing the cost (sweat equity) involved. No one complains because they didn’t hit the lotto and their numbers were duds, ROTFL…. Why not post about how the State Lottery is a scam and took your money? The cashier who suggested you play the Lucky 3 and used persuasion in up-selling you to buy more tickets, why not post about him/her? It is just ridiculous. I am NOT an FHTM rep, but I do when reading and researching things online love a real site that speaks the truth and this is not one of them. Seems to me that if people spent as much time in building their business a they do writing such nonsense, they “might” have succeeded after all. This PROBABLY won’t get approved. Go figure ;-)

    0 Votes
  • Ml
    MLM Dude Aug 14, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I could not help but notice that in all of the pictures from the convention that it was not held at a convention center like last year but a large rented room at a nice hotel. I saw bleachers set up for people to sit in. I am sure this was done to show people if you dont want to sit here in pain next year and sit with us on in the priviledged area you need to promote. While that might be motivation for some, I would have been very upset that this was promoted as the largest and best and then find out it was not. From what I can tell everyone the person that I know could not tell me much other than" will be getting soon stuff", I know people heard the same thing last year and the coffee company and other stuff never happened. Actually it looked like Paul's girlfriend, Woodson Garner has taken over and it should be called the all about "Woodson and FHTM show"
    I feel for all of those who are in FHTM. It is way to hard to stand up for them as a rep when everytime you turn around the negative press and the legal problems are just way to hard to overcome.
    I see where Trey Knight ( pres Ambasador) and several other big named people have left. Now why would you leave FHTM if you were making the big bucks to start over with another company? I think the answer is clear..FHTM is not going to be around for the long haul as expected and no one can afford to bank on a company that is continually being found to be lying and getting in trouble with the goverment. 3 Lawsuits have been filed and more I heard are coming. The one filed in Texas by Suzzanne Combs sounds like exactly what happened to the lady in Texas who lost everything while waiting to get paid from the team she had built and then found out the team had been stolen!. They cheated her out of over 100K I heard. The company has been found to move people out of downlines and cheating people out fo their due pay. The lawfirm who is handling this case is huge and they only take the best of cases. This maybe the one that takes Paul and his team of liars down.
    I dare any of the people who have been posting on here for the last 3-4 years about how wonderful FHTM is and tell us the truth about what you made in bonuses and what you made in residual. I bet not one of you can say you are still with the company and that your income from residuals is greater than what you are making ( or have made) in Bonuses resulting from sign ups.

    I look forward to hearing from everyone so we can finally see the truth.

    0 Votes
  • Ub
    uberzero Jul 27, 2011

    Another comment Lexus is no longer the leased car for FHTM, now it is BMW.

    0 Votes
  • Ub
    uberzero Jul 27, 2011

    Greetings,
    Four days ago, I have recently joined under the pressure of one of my friends just because he knows some my neighbours in apartment. Before I met that friend, I quietly requested FHTM to withdraw my independent representative status after investigating further about that company which leads me to this website. During that training, I felt nothing than headache and notice how unethical the approach was. When he showed the drawing, I recognized the pyramid scheme. I noticed how he emphasized about part of team and his buddy will be there to help for my training to reach regional representative. When I mentioned none of listed services were interesting, he suggested to call his buddy. I have an impression he was manipulated.
    I am in process to entirely leave FHTM behind. I may lose money but I do not care. I filed fax and will return the kit. I know I took a risk but I learned what not to do.

    0 Votes
  • Do
    DontBelieve What U Read Jul 24, 2011

    People who believe what they hear are so ignorant do some due diligence. FHTM is the best company in the world. All of you guys who claim its a pyramid look at everything in life. Your job is a pyramid. Look at your President, Vice President, Upper management, Lower management, your supervisor all the way down to the workers. Where do you fall in that cast of characters? If you think about it every single thing in life is network marketing. Put it this way the food you ate this morning was grown by a farmer. He priced it up and sold it to a wholesaler. He marked it up and sold it to a national retailer. He sold it to National wholesaler retailer. They shipped it to your city. They put it in the warehouse and marked it up some more. The warehouse marked it up some more and put it in local stores. The local stores marked it up and you came along and bought that steak or fruit or whatever you had for lunch or for dinner. It’s been sold 8 or 9 times before it hit your juicy lips. And you have enough nerve to call this a pyramid deal? It’s on the back of the American dollar bill with a government of eye looking right at you it’s on the back of the bill because it’s the most sounded structure in the universe. Right underneath it in Latin it says may god bless our undertakings. Why you ask? Because we work for a pyramid deal we won't need his blessing. Which is your job? And remember everything in life is network marketing whether you want to wake up and smell the coffee or not. Forget the BBB if you think its such a great rating system look on you tube and type in BBB Scam. I'm not going to argue with anyone because a lot of people want to sign up and get rich without any hard work. 80% of heart attacks happen on Monday mornings. Hmmm I wonder why?

    0 Votes
  • Ne
    New and Improved Jun 28, 2011

    Hi Tech Pyramid Scheme.

    FHTM is the new and improved version of an old scam.

    When I was approached with the sales pitch (and that is not a "knock" I am in Sales; and also therefore willing to listen to pretty much anyone's sales pitch), I was just glad they were not trying to pitch Amway.

    FHTM is ingenious, in that, it starts with major brand names you already use, then perpetuates it with monthly purchases. BUT then the pitch transitions to the "fortune" which only comes from new "investors".

    The problem with any MLM (aka pyramid scheme) is that there are not enough people on the face of the earth to make it sustainable. Per FHTM, you will need at least 12 people under you to make any meaningful money. Do the math - you'll need 60 Billion people to reach level 10. But that does not mean that I will get left holding the bag. I was still interested.

    BUT then, it become brutally obvious that it is a scheme when "to start getting rich" you need to first purchase some skin products (not transfer your cell phone bill). And by-the-by you will need to purchase them every month. WAIT A MINUTE, did I say this was NOT Amway?

    IN A NUTSHELL, basically you are either going to lose your money - or make money by talking your friends and family into losing theirs.

    It may be worth noting that there are some potential legal issues related to this "business". And it does not matter that YOU don't believe that it is a scam. And if you are a real "go-getter" you will be better off starting your own MLM business and be at the top.

    0 Votes
  • Ke
    kentucky fraud Jun 26, 2011

    Did you see the new news report posted on the fhtm class action website? It was an investigaion by Fox News in LA. I also heard that the big leader Trey Knight left FHTM and a 3rd lawsuit ( that we know of) has been filed in Texas this time mainly naming Todd Rowland as a crook who stole this ladies downline and income. With so many of these Presidential people being named in lawsuits for doing illegal acts, it makes you wonder why Paul is not cleaning house to save his company, but he would have to fire himself and Tom and his own son for lying about what they are doing. www.fhtmclassaction.info

    0 Votes
  • Ha
    Happy as heck in Mobile AL Jun 25, 2011

    It completely amazes me how negative people can be about the most awesome opportunity they will ever see. I have some of in my own family. I was introduced to FHTM in Nov 2008 by a friend of mine. I am so glad he did. Within 90 days part time, FHTM had matched my salary at a granite fab company I had owned for 8 years. I was a full time FHTM rep with in 6 months and I have been full time for over 2 years. The world has enough "devil's advocates" telling us 50 reasons why something won't work. The absolute truth is, FHTM does work and will work but YOU have to work and do something extra and that's the problem. Most people are duped into believing that working 45 to 50 years at a J.O.B. swapping hours for dollars and having no leverage or residual income is the answer. Wake up and learn how smart business is done. Everyone won't go REALLY win for their family. They're just like crabs in a bucket. Just when one crab decides there's got to be a big ole world outside this bucket and tries to crawl out, the other crabs reach up and pull him back down. When you dare to dream and actually do something about it, people will pull you down. You make them nervous and shine a light on their lack of ambition and vision. Don't be afraid to do something different to get a different result.

    1 Votes
  • Se
    Secret Millionaire Jun 19, 2011

    Suzanne Combs tells Dallas court in new lawsuit that FHTM screwed her out of her downline to make #2 idiot Todd Rowland more money. This type of behavior is condoned by the gay porn star Paul Orberson and his team of ###. Why would you put your family's future in the hands of such crooks?

    1 Votes
  • Li
    Lisarbrittian Jun 15, 2011

    I'm not sure about this company and never heard about it before today... but my advice to anyone looking to partner up with a network marketing company is to do your research on the company first. Don't just believe the "hype" because there is a lot of money to be made out there with a lot of companies... but what you have to ask yourself is... 1. What is the product and services on the table. It it is just a lot of money exchanging hands... then it is not a network marketing company but a pyramid. 2. Who is running the ship? Find out how many years experience the founders have combined in the industry. That is important... anyone can start up a company and sound like they know how to guide the ship... but documentation will always beat conversation. 3. Find out about the leadership!!! that is so important... many are left in the dust after signing on the dotted line... and 4. Find out about the training system... not just a book list or CD/DVD's... real real-live training... for more go to my website: www.lisarbrittian.info

    1 Votes
  • Ni
    Nic C Jun 13, 2011

    Hi Everyone!!

    Exciting to read all the comments, good and bad!! I joined FHTM a couple months ago and only recently started actually putting some effort into it. Yes people, it does take work. I am happy to announce, I've made my money back and am working my way up to Regional (if you don't know what that is maybe you should educate yourself). If you're looking to "get rich quick", please for the sake of the person signing you up, don't sign up. This is a business. Your business, which requires you to work hard, educate yourself and a lot of the time be your own motivator!!! I'm so tired of hearing people complain about their job, their life and how people treat them but there not willing to do anything about it!! This is an opportunity!! A great opportunity to work with people you choose, to be your own boss and make some money!! Yes, unfortunately bad experiences happen with people joining and not getting the support they need. But shame on you for not taking control of your life, going out there and getting the information you need to make this work! Obviously there is something about this that excited you, you saw the value that FHTM has to offer! Step out there and do it!! Listen to the meetings, watch the videos and push yourself to run your business the way you want to and do it for yourself!!!

    Stop complaing, get out there and do it!!

    And don't listen to the critics, the Better Business Bureau just gave us an A rating. There is information regarding this business, where the money comes from and where it goes. Everything is transparent. We deal with some huge corporate businesses out there! Trust that their team of lawyers did their homework before joining with us.

    In closing, in a short few weeks I have made back my initial fees and monthly and am now on my way to becoming Regional. The best part, I'm helping people do the same and make money too. I work hard, I am dedicated and I have the tenacity and discipline to do this. That's why this works for me. Challenge yourself to do the same. Quoting the 2nd highest earner in Canada, regarding people out there that are trying to bring you down:

    "They don't pay your bills, you do"

    Do this, challenge yourself... those people that are waiting for you to fail will be watching when you achieve your goals and surpass them!!

    Have fun!!

    0 Votes
  • Je
    JessSC Jun 10, 2011

    I have been involved with quite a few different MLM or "pyramid" companies, and haven't yet created the success I've wanted. But there is only one reason why this has not happened for me...because of ME. Can you make money doing them? --yes. Can you do it without support? --yes Is it harder to do it without support? --yes Having a good "sponsor", I believe, is very vital in creating your own success. It is unfortunate that some people promise the world and then never back up what they say, but if you want to blame someone, blame those people, not the company. You can't just sign up and expect the checks to roll in...that isn't how it works. You have to put time and energy into it just like ANY business. If you ask any business owner how much time they have put into their business it is always a lot of extra hours. If they don't succeed then there is something they (the business owner) are doing wrong. It is very easy to blame the company and I have found that that is what most people who don't succeed at a new business do. They blame circumstances, or whatever else they can come up with instead of taking a look at what it is they them selves can do different. If people would take accountability for themselves this world would look a lot different.

    0 Votes
  • Ra
    RaymondW May 31, 2011

    Let's not forget that FHTM made the "Operation Empty Promises List" put out by the Federal Trade Commision (FTC) a few months ago. Here is the link that provides the facts:

    http://www.ftc.gov/os/2011/03/110302emptypromisesstate.pdf

    I hear several Attorney Generals are investigating FHTM at this very moment. The Lexington Herald Leader located in FHTM's home State wrote an article recently about it.

    Fact/source:
    http://www.kentucky.com/2011/04/05/1697047/local-marketing-firm-being-investigated.html

    1 Votes
  • Le
    Level Headed May 30, 2011

    BOTTOM LINE: FHTM does pay, it is not a scam, it does take work, and FHTM cannot possibly be responsible for the allegations that independant representatives make on their own behalf, (this being stated, the use of trademark names is not authorized by FHTM nor does FHTM Corporate claim this to be so). If you are looking for a credible relationship marketing company with a diversified market of high quality consumable products and highly demanded services, where success is achieved through consistent work efforts, led by a caring owner who battles daily to find ways to give more back to the independent representatives, according to the guidelines and regulations set by our own Federal Trade Commission, then I would like to set your mind at ease and welcome you to join the FHTM family.

    -1 Votes
  • Se
    Secret Millionaire May 19, 2011

    1. Call your bank or credit card company and report your card lost. They will cancel it and issue a new one. This will stop the $100 a month bleeding.
    2. Cancel your FHTM membership by sending a certified letter to FHTM corporate.
    3. Good luck and sorry you were scammed

    1 Votes
  • Aj
    ajh123 May 17, 2011

    I WANT out but i dont know how... ive asked my rep who has lied to me about the entire process. told me it was a one time payment and anytime thereafter had to be authorized... clearly he was mistaken because ive been getting 100 dollars withdrawn out of my acct every month! I am a new graduate with no time to mess w this crap. He made it sound like a sweet deal when he explained things to me, but the way things were explained were not the way things have been going. I am not lazy... I am busy. With a 3 year old, my family, two jobs... no time! I realized this could not be for me after about 3 weeks of the hassle. Now I cannot get out. I would really like to know the steps, perhaps legal steps, i should take next. I can not afford any more than I am already dealing with in my finances. Someone who has terminated their fhtm acct pls tell me how to do so.

    Thank you much

    1 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe May 07, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    At a time when the current, elected leadership of the USA, and many Americans, have been claiming absolute moral authority in the wake of the US military's summary execution of Osama Bin Laden (the latest in a long line of megalomaniacal, psychopathic cult leaders guilty of perpetrating, and/or directing, evermore heinous crimes whilst steadfastly pretending absolute moral authority), yet again we have come back to an important question concerning America's wider moral-standing in the world, which the current, elected leadership of the USA, and many patriotic Americans, still seem incapable of comprehending, let alone addressing -

    1 Votes
  • B9
    B95_L66 May 02, 2011

    When you sign up for stuff through FHTM you commit for a year and will need to cancel your credit card in order to assure that no more charges are put through. Many of my friends had the same issue. They make it impossible to cance the services.

    1 Votes
  • To
    topjonny Apr 21, 2011

    what it sounds like is that it was not the FHTM companies problem, it was her sponsor that was not true to her friend. her friend that screwed her.

    0 Votes
  • Do
    Doing my due diligence Apr 18, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I am trying to find out if you sign up for one of these services, are you committed to that service for a whole year? Or can it be monthly until you cancel it? I noticed the cancellation clause of the Amusement Pack says "I understand that I may cancel this authorization by providing written notice to Ocenture, LLC at least seven (7) business days prior to the payment due date. I further understand that canceling my authorization does not relieve me of the responsibility of paying my account in full."

    This language is apparently saying I can cancel this payment AUTHORIZATION (ie: instead of my VISA, I can use my Discover) but I'm still responsible for the payment in full. What payment in full? I can't seem to figure that out! How much am I going to be committed to if I sign up for the Amusement Pack? 12 x $24.99? +20 nonrefundable something?

    And if you sign up with FHTM, and then want to resign your distributorship, do you still pay those service fees for a year? Or can you get out of all of them at the same time?

    thanks!

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Apr 08, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Courtesy of Corporate Frauds Watch...
    In 'MLM business opportunity' frauds, direct association with trusted brands has been a lie by Shyam

    In a previous post, I drew your free-thinking readers' attention to some remarkable optical illusions which clearly demonstrate that the human mind can be easily deceived simply by changing the context in which we see things http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-11553099 . A stalking-panther, when photographed in a jungle environment, is almost invisible to the human eye if shown only in black and white, but the same dangerous predator is immediately obvious to us when shown in color. Two squares of identical color and shade, appear to be of completely different color and shade when each one is surrounded by squares which alter the context in which our minds automatically see them.

    No one now seriously disputes that deluded, core-'MLM' adherents look at 'MLM business opportunity' frauds only in two dimensions, 'positive' and 'negative.' A growing mountain of quantifiable evidence proves that vast numbers of ill-informed people have been deceived into entering this style of camouflaged totalitarian cult, then, on the pretext that 'the duplication of a step-by-step positive plan will lead to success, ' they have been intellectually-castrated (without their fully-informed consent) so that their minds will only accept what their leaders have arbitrarily defined as 'positive, ' and to exclude what these same charlatans have arbitrarily defined as 'negative.' When seen only in the fake 'positive' context of: 'Business', 'Independence', 'Financial Freedom', 'Direct Selling', 'Low Risk', 'Income Opportunity', etc. 'MLM business opportunity' frauds can appear to be authentic. This dangerous inversion of reality has been further confirmed by (apparently independent) : celebrity endorsements, glossy-advertizing, 'Direct Selling Associations', etc.; all of which form a pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity, because all these artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts have actually been financed by the profits of fraud in order to continue to perpetrate the same fraud. It is only when you take 'MLM business opportunity' frauds out of their artificially-created, fake 'positive' contexts, that their true, predatory nature becomes immediately obvious.

    One of the most-deceptive, fake 'positive' contexts in which 'MLM business opportunity' frauds have been presented is there apparent direct association with trusted brands. Currently, in the USA, the millionaire racketeers behind the 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' lie are being challenged in court for having pretended direct association with some of America's most famous companies: including: General Electric, DuPont, Time, Verizon Wireless and AT&T, Travelocity, Peter Lamas and BSP Rewards Mall. For, according to documents presented in court, none of these companies has ever had a direct association with 'FHTM.' Furthermore, the officers of all these companies were actually unaware that their valuable brand-names and trademarks were being used by racketeers to commit fraud. The only connection that the 'FHTM' fake has had with all these authentic companies is that 'FHTM' has been a corporate customer of their products and services. Yet again, the use of this devious technique of psychological persuasion has been copied from the original 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, 'Amway.'

    According to an 'FHTM' whistleblower, Joseph Isaacs: 'When these companies find out that their trademarks, names, logos and reputations are being used by FHTM in order to aide FHTM in proving its legitimacy they will issue a cease and desist order, insist on actions to stop or not allow FHTM to market their products'. Indeed, currently every one of the companies listed above has either issued a cease and desist order against 'FHTM, ' or no longer allows itself to be aligned with 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing.'

    Again, according to Joseph Isaacs, 'FHTM leaders would systematically tell prospects during presentations that FHTM must be legal, because no iconic Fortune 100 company would affiliate with a scam' and that 'all of these major companies had sent their CEO’s and legal teams to meet with FHTM founder, Paul Orberson, to evaluate his MLM company.' Self-evidently these scripted-lies were part of an overall pattern of ongoing, major, racketeering activity.

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

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  • Th
    Threadhot Apr 05, 2011
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    I can understand why some people will be sceptical of MLM's but they all work on the same premise. YOU NEED TO RECRUIT. They however have a game plan to follow and if you do what they train you to do, it is not hard. Fhtm has a varied amount of products you can sign up for to get your points and earn commissions. You are supposed to use what makes sense for you and not sign up for what doesn't. I have been in for two months and have made it to regional and have 5 signed up since then. They have paid me everything they have promised. We were probably lucky that we have a great sponsor who truly enjoys driving wherever and giving the presentations for us. He even offered us $200 bonus out of his own pocket for getting 3 people in in one month. He's awesome. This way we were paid back what we put in the first month. And he tells everyone straight up, if your not willing to do the work, dont join, and if your not willing to help someone else we dont want you. He even does online webinars for us if people live to far to travel. We will soon be prepared enough to show the presentation ourselves very soon, but if we didnt want to, he would as long as he wasnt booked already, he loves it. I tell my people to use him as your tool he is here for you and he is a trustworthy person who follows thru with what he says. I have researched the services and here in Sunny CA. the prices are the same as if I went to the verizon website for my internet service and cell phone. The only company that wont let you resign is dish net. This was not a problem for us we were on direct tv. My monthly bill will be about 1/2 the price for the first year so I will be saving money over directv. So you may need to sign with directv for two years before you can switch back. But how hard is it to get your friends to sign up with you when it is time to renew their cell plans when it is the same phones and same plans? My girlfriends husband copied the website and made his own cell phone service book and took it to work. The employees were fighting over it and he had 5 people sign up for renewing their phones in two weeks. They now have more than enough points. You have to be creative. Do you need to work this business to make money? Yes you do.
    They arent going to hand you money on a silver platter and feed it to you. There will always be people who complain because they dont have what it takes, if you know you will not be able to go up to someone you hardly know and ask if they are open to making extra money, then dont join. And it is unfortunate that someone got taken by an unscrupulous member who should be kicked out immediately. This company is about paying it forward and helping others. If I had any advice it would be just make sure you trust your sponsor or don't sign with them. Just remember most companies you start take two years to make a profit. It takes time like anything else. Am I going to complain that I have to buy some vitamins to keep my points (lets say someone canceled their phone) when I'm making 3, 000 a month? no I dont think so. If you really have a sponsor that is not very good at helping you should be going to your website and watching the videos because the same information is on there your sponsor should be telling you. Its actually better because you can replay it over and over. We also have calls twice a week and recorded calls for your training. So if you have the innitiative there is no way for you to fail except to quit. Dont be brought down by negativity, it loves company.

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  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Apr 04, 2011
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    Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing loses Verizon Wireless from product offering
    ________________________________________
    http://www.articlemonster.com/busine...-offering.html

    So many questions and not enough answers. In a world fighting for customers and companies watching over their reputations like a hawk, what do these companies all have in common? I am referring to major Fortune 100 icons like General Electric, DuPont, Time, Verizon Wireless and AT&T as well as some smaller ones like Travelocity, Peter Lamas and BSP Rewards Mall.

    The answer is simple, somehow over the past 10 years and probably unbeknownst to them, they became aligned with a Multi-Level Marketing company known as Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing (FHTM). This was mainly accomplished because Fortune Hi-Tech does business with some of their authorized dealers and 3rd party affiliates. Fortune’s attempt to prove it’s legal by association has backfired, as it normally does. It is very difficult to build your reputation at the expense of someone bigger, when they have no idea who you are.

    Should these companies have a say in who gets to use their brand in the pursuit of the almighty dollar? For the first time in FHTM’s history the number of companies represented by it on the menu board at fhtm.net is shrinking. How can that be good?

    According to court documents and a major USA Today expose, last September, none of these companies had direct relationships with FHTM.
    In March 2010, Monica Lindeen, the Securities Commissioner for the State of Montana, issued a cease and desist against Fortune HI-Tech Marketing for operating an illegal endless recruiting pyramid scheme. Since then Texas has demanded documents in an investigation, South Carolina AG Roy Cooper, has opened an investigation into Fortune’s business practices, as part of the FTC’s “Operation Empty Promises”, and its own home state of Kentucky has done the same.

    Two blistering heart pounding class-action lawsuits have pummeled FHTM in 2010 as well. The first was filed in Federal Court in Kentucky in September 2010 and the other in Federal Court in Southern California two days before Christmas last year too. Neither of these lawsuits have been certified as a class yet, and mainly due to some extensive manipulation of the legal system by the Fortune legal team.

    What is the cost of that battle? Some estimate legal costs upwards of $500K monthly. That certainly will take a huge chunk out of any business’ cash flow. Fortune is not the first MLM or pyramid scheme to be involved in major lawsuits. Amway just agreed to pay a record settlement of close to $150 Million. Most top law firms and executives know they can’t win these types of suits, and mainstream media leaves a negative impact on their business. Attorneys have very little defense to RICO and pyramid scheme allegations, and after spending millions trying to defend the allegations, usually make arrangements for settlement conferences. They may win some of the small battles but not the war. What is the depth of the scars these lawsuits leave to deter others to join?

    So the important question now remains, why did these huge conglomerates allow their names and reputations to potentially be smeared by a company like FHTM? The answer is simple - they didn’t know what was happening.

    According to ex-representative, Joseph Isaacs from Tampa, Florida, “When these companies find out that their trademarks, names, logos and reputations are being used by FHTM in order to aide FHTM in proving its’ legitimacy they will issue a cease or desist, insist on the actions to stop or not allow FHTM to market their products”. Which others will walk when they find out the real business model and litigation history of Fortune Hi-Tech?

    As of March 2011 every one of the companies listed above has either issued a cease and desist or no longer allows itself to be aligned with Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing. How has this affected their aura of legitimacy? How do they explain all of this to new and even existing independent representatives?

    In reviewing some FHTM business presentations on YouTube, it was apparent that the logos of GE, DuPont, Verizon and AT&T were there for one reason. What are the repercussions of only being legal by association? According to Joseph Isaacs, “Top leaders would tell prospects during the business presentation that they must be legal because no iconic Fortune 100 company would affiliate with a scam”. “All of these major companies sent their CEO’s and legal teams to meet with founder Paul Orberson to evaluate FHTM and check out their books. This cannot be so and was nothing more than a lie used to recruit”, he added. What rhetoric do these leaders use today to explain the loss of such major brands? Only time will tell.

    Will FHTM leaders and owners blame the latest Verizon fiasco on the reps like they did in their announcement pertaining to DuPont only a few weeks ago? How long will this saga continue? Which other company will research the true business model of Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing and un-align themselves next? It is too early to tell but this story is far from over.

    If the massacre continues then Fortune will be nothing more than a vitamin and dog food MLM. That is not very hi-tech and not too many fortunes will be made by affiliation. How much representative revenue has been lost as a result of these major companies walking away? How many current representatives are scrambling to replace so many customer points? How many Regional and Executive managers won’t get bonuses because their team points are greatly depleted because of the latest loss? We searched high and low for the answers but didn’t find any.

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  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Apr 01, 2011
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    Courtesy of Corporate Frauds Watch:

    For 50+ years, virtually no 'MLM' wampum has been sold to the public for a profit by Shyam

    Last year, we posted an exposé of a grotesque, narcissistic charlatan, Alan Kippax, and his pernicious 'MLM business opportunity' cult, known as 'Business In Motion.' We later informed readers that Mr. Kippax had been jailed in Canada for causing the death (by wreckless driving) of his cousin and for maiming an innocent young couple, and that his ongoing 'MLM/BIM' racketeering activities were finally facing limited, criminal investigation in Canada. At that time, I severely criticized UK government trade regulators who (6 years previously)) had caught Kippax red-handed, running the identical 'Amway' copy-cat cult in Britain behind an absurd corporate front known as 'Treasure Traders Corp.', but who had then allowed this dangerous little liar to flee to his homeland of Canada with stolen funds totalling several millions pounds which he used to set up the 'BIM' fraud.

    In 2005, instead of the UK police immediately arresting Kippax under the Theft Act and seizing his ill-gotten gains, this affair was left to UK government trade regulators who have absolutely no powers to make criminal investigations. Consequently, legal advisers to the UK Dept. of Trade and Industry could only to file a civil, public interest bankruptcy petition against Kippax' front company. It was then revealed in court that the 'Treasure Traders Plan for Financial Freedom' was, in point of fact, a dissimulated closed-market swindle, contrary to UK Trading Schemes and Lotteries legislation, in which Kippax had arbitrarily defined unlawful internal payments (in exchange for effectively-unsaleable wampum) as lawful external 'sales.' http://www.insolvency-service.co.uk/viewpiucasedetails.asp?companyname=Treasure%20Traders%20Corporation%20Limited . In this way, Kippax had deceived several thousands UK citizens into handing over regular cash payments to his counterfeit 'direct selling company' on the pretext that anyone could retire from work by being their own loyal 'Treasure Traders' customer and by recruiting their friends and relations to be their own loyal customers, etc. ad infinitum. In simple terms, Alan Kippax was proved to be a common thief who had stolen millions of pounds from thousands of UK citizens, but he never faced the slightest criminal charge in the UK.

    Corporate Frauds Watch received various supporting comments from a middle-aged American couple, Mr. and Mrs. Basset, who were, apparently, former, deluded adherents of Mr. Kippax' unoriginal, economic pseudo-science. However, these same people have subsequently posted unsubstantiated material on the Net denying the reality of our wider-analysis of 'MLM business opportunity' Fraud, in which they steadfastly pretend intellectual authority, by insisting that I have not conducted enough research to pronounce all MLM companies to be hiding esentially the same racket. However, Mr. and Mrs. Basset would appear to be under the spell of yet another gang of grinning 'MLM business opportunity' racketeers http://togethertothetop.com/ . The fact that senior agents within the US Federal Trade Commission have recently issued a blanket-warning to the American public about 'MLM business oportunity' fraud http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoB2PKYbu4Q, whilst, for years, other senior FTC agents have refused to enforce criminal laws which prohibit it, has had the effect of authorizing major, ongoing racketeering activity not just in the USA, but also around the globe. Essentially, the FTC currently holds the same reality-denying position as Mr. and Mrs Basset. On the one hand, US government trade regulators (like Eileen Harrington) fully-accept that 'MLM business opportunities' are fraudulent, whilst on the other hand, these same officials need to cling to the fairytale that other 'MLM business opportunities' are viable. Indeed, if senior FTC officials (like Eileen Harrington), were publicly to face up to the ugly truth that their own colleagues have been acting under the influence of racketers, the US government would be buried under an avalanche of litigation and certain corrupt FTC officials would risk disgrace and long prisons terms. Tellingly, I have recently tried to speak with Eileen Harrington, but I was told by her Orwellian assistant that she doesn't accept calls from the public. Yet the public are her employers.

    Meanwhile, in the adult world of quantifiable reality, the mountain of evidence proving our wider-analysis of 'MLM' to be accurate, continues to grow.

    Like the bosses, and reality-inverting propagandists, of the 'Amway' mob, the bosses, and reality-inverting propagandists, of the 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' mob have steadfastly pretended that:

    Their direct selling company is perfectly lawful and is associated with all manner of trusted household-names in the USA.
    They cannot be held responsible if some rogue 'Independent FHTM Business Owners' do not obey the company's own rules which oblige them regularly to sell significant quantities of good-value products, and services, to the public for a profit.

    At the same time, numerous dissidents, testify that the 'FHTM' plan for financial freedom is, in point of fact, a dissimulated closed-market swindle, in which unlawful internal paymets (in exchange for effectively-unsaleable wampum) have been arbitrarily defined as lawful external 'sales.' In this way, tens of thousands of 'FHTM' adherents continue to be deceived into handing over regular cash-payments to a counterfeit 'direct selling company' controlled by a little gang of sanctimonious racketeers, on the pretext that anyone can retire from work by being their own loyal 'FHTM ' customer and by recruiting their friends and relations to be their own loyal customers, etc. ad infinitum.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UIHmRvK1chw

    Independent evidence from all around the world proves beyond all reasonable doubt that, for the previous 50+ years, virtually no 'MLM' wampum has been sold to the public for a profit, and that all so-called 'MLM companies' are absurd fakes which have actually been peddling variations of essentially the same 'business opportunity' lie to tens of millions of constantly-churning victims.

    I have previously been criticized as 'grossly over-reacting, ' for describing this multi-billion dollar global-fraud as a financial holocaust (with a small 'h') of which many people are in denial, but how esle would one accurately describe it?

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

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  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 25, 2011
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    I found this in another blog and thought I would share it:

    'Amway' and 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' are the American Dream made Nightmare

    Here are two recent articles from 'USA Today' for your free-thinking readers.

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/retail/2011-02-07-multilevelmarketing03_CV_N.htm

    http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2010-10-15-multilevelmarketing14_CV_N.htm

    The criminogenic organization known as 'Fortune Hi-Tech Marketing' is an 'Amway' copy-cat. i.e. 'FHTM' is the reality-inverting label over the entrance to yet another self-perpetuating 'MLM business opportunity' cult. 'FHTM' was instigated, and is run, by a gang of exceedingly-greedy, but otherwise-mediocre, little raketeers from Kentucky. These narcissistic parasites have begun to grow rich by peddling an unoriginal lie whilst steadfastly pretending moral and intellectual authority.

    In the adult world of quantifiable reality, the authenticity of the 'FHTM' lie is currently being challenged all over the USA, after the State of Montana charged that 'FHTM' was actually a dissimulated pyramid scheme. However, exactly like the billionaire bosses of the 'Amway' mob, the millionaire bosses of the 'FHTM' mob posed as innocent Christian businessmen/philanthropists under attack and instructed their aggressive echelon of attorneys to negotiate a 'settlement' with the plaintiffs. i.e. Without admitting any fault, they agreed to hand-over a significant chunk of their ill-gotten gains in Montana, in order to continue their clandestine criminal activities elsewhere.

    It is common knowledge in the USA that 'FHTM' is a pernicious blame-the-victim scam http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZxCK4adtuA . Indeed, it is common knowledge in the USA that all so-called 'Multi-Level Marketing' companies are shielding essentially the same, premeditated, closed-market swindle.

    This general video warning has been recently produced by the Bureau of Consumer Protection at the US Federal Trade Commission http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoB2PKYbu4Q . However, it beggars belief that senior FTC officials like Eileen Harrington can use public funds to pretend that the FTC wants to protect the American people from 'MLM business opportunity' fraud, when, for decades, other senior FTC officials have allowed this cancer not only to gnaw its way into the USA, but also into the rest of the world.

    Despite more than half a century of damning-evidence, senior US government trade officials prefer to remain blissfully-ignorant of the fact that behind so-called 'MLM' companies has lurked the ongoing historical phenomenon of criminogenic, or pernicious, cultism. Meanwhile, the self-appointed bosses of these reality-inverting, totalitarian groups continue to rake-in vast fortunes by peddling variations of the same Utopian fiction as fact.

    'MLM business opportunity' fraud is undoubtedly a form of major organized crime spawned in the USA. It should never have been left to ill-informed, and/or corrupt, American regulators to deal with this internal threat to democracy and the rule of law.

    'Amway' and 'FHTM' are the American Dream made Nightmare.

    David Brear (copyright 2011)

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  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 23, 2011
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    FHTM has been lying about its D&B rating since 2004. It does not hold a 3A1 rating from this agency. See current report here:

    http://www.fhtmclassaction.info/FHTM_2011_D&B%20Report.pdf

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  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 22, 2011
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    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers - More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners including FHTM!

    Attorney General Roy Cooper today joined state attorneys general from across the country and the Federal Trade Commission to announce a national sweep targeting business opportunity scams, including actions against four companies that have targeted North Carolina consumers.
    “When jobs are scarce, claims to help people make money fast become plentiful, ” Cooper said. “Consumers think they’re buying into a great way to earn a living, but they could end up paying far more than they’ll ever make.”

    In challenging economic times, many people in the state are looking for work. Unfortunately, sometimes they find scams instead of legitimate opportunities. Complaints to the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division about business opportunity, work-at-home schemes, and other employment related scams were up 11 percent last year, from 177 complaints in 2009 to 197 complaints in 2010.
    Operation Empty Promises is a national sweep by the FTC, Cooper and other state attorneys general aimed at stopping business opportunity scams and educating consumers about how to avoid them. Announced as part of the sweep are actions taken by Cooper’s Consumer Protection Division against four companies including Fortune Hi Tech Marketing who claims that people who buy into its business earn thousands of dollars a year. Based on consumer complaints, Cooper’s office launched an investigation into FHTM in mid 2010. Consumers say they paid money to the company but were only able to make money by recruiting others into the scheme, not by selling any actual goods or services. A total of 25 consumers have now complained about FHTM, and Cooper’s office is investigating the company. Although this case is currently under investigation, it’s important for consumers to know that a pyramid scheme is a violation of the law and is defined as any plan in which a participant pays money for the chance to receive money upon the introduction of new participants into the program.
    “We’re looking closely at business opportunities that seem to offer false hopes, and also reaching out to educate consumers on how to recognize and avoid fraud, ” Cooper said.

    Later this month, Cooper’s office plans to launch a tool kit to educate consumers on fake business opportunities which will include print, web and video materials. The goal is to prevent North Carolina consumers from losing their hard-earned money to scammers trying to take advantage of a tough employment market.

    “Don’t let scammers use empty promises of jobs with high earnings to take your money, ” Cooper warned consumers. “Before you agree to invest in any business, check it out thoroughly and always be skeptical of claims of guaranteed profits.”

    Cooper has taken action against a number of other kinds of scams fueled by hard times. For example, his Consumer Protection Division has won 13 cases against foreclosure assistance and loan modification scams in the past five years, including two so far in 2011.The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at the FTC website.

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  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 21, 2011
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    FTC Steps Up Efforts Against Scams That Target Financially-Strapped Consumers

    More Than 90 Actions Brought By Commission and Its Law Enforcement Partners including FHTM

    Attorney General Roy Cooper today joined state attorneys general from across the country and the Federal Trade Commission to announce a national sweep targeting business opportunity scams, including actions against four companies that have targeted North Carolina consumers.

    “When jobs are scarce, claims to help people make money fast become plentiful, ” Cooper said. “Consumers think they’re buying into a great way to earn a living, but they could end up paying far more than they’ll ever make.”

    In challenging economic times, many people in the state are looking for work. Unfortunately, sometimes they find scams instead of legitimate opportunities. Complaints to the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division about business opportunity, work-at-home schemes, and other employment related scams were up 11 percent last year, from 177 complaints in 2009 to 197 complaints in 2010.

    Operation Empty Promises is a national sweep by the FTC, Cooper and other state attorneys general aimed at stopping business opportunity scams and educating consumers about how to avoid them. Announced as part of the sweep are actions taken by Cooper’s Consumer Protection Division against four companies including Fortune Hi Tech Marketing who claims that people who buy into its business earn thousands of dollars a year. Based on consumer complaints, Cooper’s office launched an investigation into FHTM in mid 2010. Consumers say they paid money to the company but were only able to make money by recruiting others into the scheme, not by selling any actual goods or services. A total of 25 consumers have now complained about FHTM, and Cooper’s office is investigating the company. Although this case is currently under investigation, it’s important for consumers to know that a pyramid scheme is a violation of the law and is defined as any plan in which a participant pays money for the chance to receive money upon the introduction of new participants into the program.

    “We’re looking closely at business opportunities that seem to offer false hopes, and also reaching out to educate consumers on how to recognize and avoid fraud, ” Cooper said.

    Later this month, Cooper’s office plans to launch a tool kit to educate consumers on fake business opportunities which will include print, web and video materials. The goal is to prevent North Carolina consumers from losing their hard-earned money to scammers trying to take advantage of a tough employment market.

    “Don’t let scammers use empty promises of jobs with high earnings to take your money, ” Cooper warned consumers. “Before you agree to invest in any business, check it out thoroughly and always be skeptical of claims of guaranteed profits.”

    Cooper has taken action against a number of other kinds of scams fueled by hard times. For example, his Consumer Protection Division has won 13 cases against foreclosure assistance and loan modification scams in the past five years, including two so far in 2011.The Federal Trade Commission today stepped up its ongoing campaign against scammers who falsely promise guaranteed jobs and opportunities to “be your own boss” to consumers who are struggling with unemployment and diminished incomes as a consequence of the economic downturn.

    “Operation Empty Promises, ” a multi-agency law enforcement initiative today announced more than 90 enforcement actions, including three new FTC cases and developments in seven other matters, 48 criminal actions by the Department of Justice (many of which involved the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service), seven additional civil actions by the Postal Inspection Service, and 28 actions by state law enforcement agencies in Alaska, California, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Montana, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and the District of Columbia.

    In a press conference at the FTC, David Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, was joined by Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice; Greg Campbell, Deputy Chief Inspector of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service; North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper; and a California consumer who had bought into a program to start his own Internet business.

    “The victims of these frauds are our neighbors – people who are trying to make an honest living, ” said David C. Vladeck, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Under pressure to make ends meet, they risked their limited financial resources in response to the promise of a job, an income – a chance at a profitable home-based business. But these turned out to be empty promises – and the people who counted on them ended up with high levels of frustration and even higher levels of debt.”

    The FTC has updated consumer education materials to help consumers avoid falling victim to these scams. Screen shots from the websites of some of the operators charged in this law enforcement sweep, as well as video footage of FTC Consumer Protection Director Vladeck and FTC attorney Daniel Hanks, are also available at the FTC website.

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  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 21, 2011
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    Good answer Raymond. Does anyone know why Paul fired Judy Hammerschmidt a couple of weeks ago? Is that funny that she was relieved of her responsibilities as General Counsel just as the FTC was putting FHTM (the only MLM) on its "hit list" in Operation empty Promises?

    During her watch at Herbalife that company was hit with AG investigations and multiple class actions...for the same thing. Now she is responsible for creating the same disaster at FHTM. Maybe she should have been more adament when she told Paul the pay plan was a pyramid scheme instead of taking a piece of True Essentials to keep her mouth shut.

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  • Ra
    RaymondW Mar 17, 2011

    Sorry to break your mojo sjt61, but that is not what a typical expectation would be for the average FHTM rep. Think about it, if it was, then FHTM’s income disclosure statement would reflect the positives that you alone experience, but instead 95% of those that sign into FHTM are going broke and that does not include the 30% of those that made nothing and it doesn't include months reps didn't earn a check. If it did then I'm sure the numbers would look devastating. Also if it was all sweet and rosy as you would like to paint for yourself then a handful of Attorney Generals from across the States would not be investigating their alleged pyramiding and the FTC would have not have placed them on a list called “Operation Empty Promises.” Then there is a the question of why some of FHTM's top leaders are leaving if they are making all this money. Keep signing them up sjt61, after all, that is the focus and now the FTC is taking notice of it. What more information does one need?

    0 Votes
  • Sj
    sjt61 Mar 16, 2011

    I am an independent rep. for FHTM and like one of the other reps was saying I have had only positive experiences with FHTM. The amount of money you make depends on how hard you want to work. If someone took money from you and you never saw them again they were scamming you, not FHTM. FHTM has a very high code of ethics that they follow. You don't follow them then you are out. My sponsor and his sponsor have both been very helpful to me. I have people sighned up in my downline that I have never even met before. And if you think it takes $250 to get started in this business you're worng. Do your research.
    st

    0 Votes
  • all I need to Known, how do you trust all this people from FHTM with your personal information like your social number or your bank account, how safe is this?

    0 Votes
  • Ba
    Barbara Bushe Mar 09, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Attorney General Roy Cooper of NC joins FTC for a nationwide crackdown on business opportunity rip off known as "Operation Empty Promises." FHTM was listed as one of the Top 4 Rip Off Schemes.

    Based on consumer complaints, Cooper’s office launched an investigation into FHTM in mid 2010. Consumers say they paid money to the company but were only able to make money by recruiting others into the scheme, not by selling any actual goods or services. A total of 25 consumers have now complained about FHTM, and Cooper’s office is investigating the company.

    It's about time FTC is getting involved.

    0 Votes

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