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Florida Child Support / Child Support Enforcement

1 2428 Clearlake Rd.Cocoa, FL, United States Review updated:
Contact information:
Phone: 1-800-622-5437

I have four children the first childs father didn't pay child support till she was 13 she's 18 now and he has only ever paid 80.00 a month I have requested several times for them to please appeal for more and the worker tells me they can't find him... Um then how is he paying every month? My 12 year olds father gets weekend custody but, didn't start paying till she was 11 and he pays 160 a month and no back child support was ordered. I now have twins with the father who abandoned us... to move back with his mother in Massachusetts. I talked him into coming back and trying to work it out... meanwhile I brought him in for DNA testing knowing he might try and leave again, needless to say he did, but, they refused to do it and said we had to do it in Mass. Now he's hiding at his mom's house they say they have sent the DNA test there but there's nothing else they can do!!! I don't believe it I wrote a letter to Mass child support department and they started to work with me ...They actually answer their phones, But when I talked to my Florida Rep. he practically threatened me telling me I was not to call them that I had to go through him!!! Well, this is rediculous I am very ill with Chrons right now and haven't been able to hold a job due to the illness and it is impossible to live on 240.00 a month we recieve food stamps but nothing else...I have begged a pleaded for help they don't give a crap about these children and I am living in poverty... This is rediculous I am trying to raise 4 girls with little to no help I am educated and have been the soul provider for my children. Please any suggestions I cannot raise twins with no father and no support, I have to find some help. Any solutions please email me shannonlynnnolan@yahoo.com

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Comments

  • Ck
      28th of Aug, 2010
    0 Votes

    My ex has paid some of the time but never the full amount that was court ordered. In 2006 he moved to New York and stopped paying altogether. It took almost 2 years for the State of Florida to adopt my order from another state and then get New York to honor it. He was court ordered to pay $1125 per month and then 1 month after they garnished his checks he got the state of New York to reduce his payments to $200 per month because the State of Florida had emancipated my son on his 18th birthday which was 6 months prior to his graduation. My ex failed to respond or appear to three court hearings and now has moved back to Florida and when he missed making 2 months worth of payments the state of New York started garnishing him for over $1500 a month and so he filed for a modification and we are waiting on a hearing. The State of Florida contacted New York and severed their relationship because he was in Florida but New York failed to notifiy his employer to stop garnishement. Two days after the first check was late I went into the local office and they were supposed to call his employer but waited for 7 days before they did. When they heard back from the employer that the money had been sent to the State of New York they waited some more and told me that the State of New York would send the money back to his employer and the employer now knew to send it directly to Florida. Wrong! The State of New York refunded the money directly back to my ex. I could write a book on how much the State of Florida has screwed up every step of this process. My children are grown and I am just looking to get paid back aprox $60, 000 that is owed to me but I cannot imagine dealing with the State of Florida if my children's lives depended on it. Knowing what I know now about everything they do - or don't do I would never let them represent my children. The system in Florida is seriously flawed. The people working the system don't care that your children are starving. My only suggestion would be to not continue to put yourself and your children through hell and move to Utah and go on welfare.

  • Re
      21st of Jul, 2012
    0 Votes

    I think when the absent parent lives in another state it is harder to get child support from the absent parent. My daughter and her kids live in SD and when she got divorced her "ex" went to Florida and married a woman he met online and within six months they had a daughter. He is one of these people that is always changing jobs and knew how to play the child support game because he had been through it before he married my daughter. He would let himself get $2, 000-$3, 000 behind and then start paying because he knew that being he was out of state, SD wouldn't go after him unless he got something like $5, 000-$10, 000 behind, because of what it would cost the state. Thankfully, my grandkids are now adults, so we don't have to worry about child support.

    As far as the father who says he is a seasonal worker, he could get a job that isn't seasonal or move where the weather doesn't affect construction. However, when he is unable to work he should be able to collect unemployment benefits. I know a young woman who has a baby by a seasonal worker and he has two other kids by two other women, and he has never been married to any of them. Child support collection has money garnished from his checks for each one of these illegimate kids. If I was the custodial parent I would have child support garnished, that way there would be definite proof of what had been paid and when.

    Back in the 80s when I got divorced, my attorney and the child support collection office required that my "ex" take the monthly checks to the clerk of courts office where I had to go and pick it up.

    I don't feel at all sorry for the whining non-custodial parents, it is their responsibility to support their kids, unless they are absolutely positive they aren't they parent. It seems like I have heard that there are some states that state if a person signs the birth certificate that means they are the legal parent, even if it is proven later on with a DNA test that they aren't.

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