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Chauncey Crandall Complaints & Reviews - What a rip off

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Chauncey Crandall

Posted: 2012-05-17 by    Jill Noble

What a rip off

Complaint Rating:  70 % with 20 votes
Contact information:
Chauncey Crandall
United States
Chauncey Crandall is medicine doctor who advertised free consultation but when I was going to apply for that consultation I was asked to pay... What a nonsense, why a hell did he advertise free service??? If he is such a bad person I doubt he will be good doctor.
Comments United States Doctors
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 29th of May, 2012 by   rhoneyman 0 Votes
there is no link to the offer, making it impossible to understand the full context. without being able to understand the context, this is a useless bit of grousing.

then there's the problem of labeling the physician as a "bad person" when there is no way to know what the real issue was. in many cases, a credit card is requested even for freebies because the freebie is a sample that automatically converts into a paid subscription (or something like that). since there are usually opt-outs prior to having to actually start the paid portion, the free sample is, in fact, free. doing what the rest of the commercial world does fails to make someone a "bad person."
 30th of Jan, 2013 by   Jerry.G 0 Votes
I have nothing to do with Crandall in any way - so my question is not tainted. If what he is providing has at least a modicum of credibility, wouldn't it be worth some amount to buy and read? So the newsletter may not be worth the annual subscription. How much is it worth? Fundamentally his sales pitch makes sense. I knew going into the pitch that it was not free (blessed with common sense, I guess!). Don't think of everybody as a crook. Getting all worked up over a few minutes or dollars (both of which are in your control) is not good for the heart.
 27th of Feb, 2013 by   Tak Li -1 Votes
First, I have to be skeptical of Crandall because his "advice" is simply a sales pitch. Is his priority disseminating health information to the public, or is it scoring another sale? The whole thing came off much more like the latter. Second, he openly associates himself with an outfit called "Newsmax" which specializes in highly partisan and easily disproved misinformation and disinformation. Probably best to steer clear of Crandall.
 22nd of May, 2013 by   DirkR -1 Votes
If Chandall had a honest passion to fight against heart disease, he would share his information freely, openly, concisely. Instead he packages a few sensible statements in an incredibly piece of sales crap, robbing his message from every trace of authenticity.
 30th of May, 2013 by   G. S. -1 Votes
You're taking a chance with Chauncey. There is no way to totally prevent heart disease. An ongoing newsletter isn't necessary to explain it if there is. A few simple changes in lifestyle and diet could be explained in his "free book". Nothing more is needed. What is the purpose of an ongoing newsletter that costs $45 a year - forever? If he has a cure for heart disease he should make this available to peer review and have it dispersed around the world as a primary treatment for everyone thus eliminating the scourge of heart disease from the earth. This is a money making con similar to diet fads only more sinister as it involves your life.
 8th of Jun, 2013 by   conroetech +1 Votes
Oh come on 'DirkR ! So you are saying that he shouldn't charge 45 bucks /yr? I tell you what, I own my own company. People hire me for my knowledge. Knowledge that they don't have. My customers don't hire me for my looks. They hire me for my knowledge. It's not about who I am but rather the fact that I know something that they don't but. I went to school for several years pursuing my degrees. And it wasn't free. It also cost money to own a business. Just like it cost's Dr.Chandall to be a doctor/surgeon. You're complaining because he doesn't make his subscription free? You must be one of those 'Occupiers' or at the least a very liberal person. You think that every thing should be free. What is the most important thing to everyone of us? It's our life! You can order a subscription of Sport's Illustrated for around $25.00. But you complain about $45 dollars for information that can save your life. I will never understand people like you. Get away from the computer and go get a Job!
 21st of May, 2014 by   rcjteng 0 Votes
He is already a well-known and respectable doctor, so why is he charging so much? $55 and $88 is a lot of money for a newsletter subscription. His "Free gift" is worth $15 at most. And a digital subscription should be even less expensive but he charges the same amount. This is very upsetting for many people who cannot afford this.

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