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The Freije CompanyFraudulent &water 'conditioner'&

My boss purchased a device she believed would make water "soft" merely by wrapping a wire from the device around her water pipe. This is impossible; I did not know she had purchased the fraudulent device until a year after she had done so and I saw it "installed" in her house. If she had asked me first before buying the device I would have explained to her the basic physics involved and why the device cannot do what the sellers claim it can do.

The device's web site claims the device can perform the impossible: however, no electromagnetic field can perform ion exchanging and "soften" water, no matter what frequency that field might be subjecting to the water, no matter what gauss.

The web site claims "EasyWater is a water conditioner that physically changes the minerals in water to prevent them from forming scale." That is not possible with any electromagnetic field: water is paramagnetic, not ferromagnetic. Nor can a little wire wrapped around a water pipe apply any inductive field, no matter how clever the engineer, that will modify the water in any way.

It's a scam; a fraud; a crime, and the seller should be prosecuted as such. Yet the person selling these worthless devices is selling them for as high as $1, 979 each.

Please ask any of your hydroengineer or chemical consultants to look at the claims on the web site: that consultant will tell you it is a fraud and that the device claims to perform a miracle.

Responses

  • Da
    Dals54 Oct 22, 2014
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I am a former Geo-Science guy with a background in ground water and wells ( last 28 years construction contractor). Too much real science to research for this comment. "Rude Man & Roger Ramjett" are asking the right questions followed by "what is known". In particular, the variable of mass and I will add "time". The "Black Box", look up Def., that is the Easywater 2000 apparently works on the the principal of precipitating Calcium out of solution via electric induction to produce Calcium Carbonate. As a quick example, an electrified metal fence will produce CaCO3 (concrete) slowly when immersed in saltwater. A myth exists that the flushed water in your toilet circulates clockwise ( in the Northern Hemisphere) due to the well known phenomena of the "Coriolis Force" which determines the current direction of the Earth's Oceans and Atmosphere. If this was true you would never know because you would never make it to toilet to find out due to the fact you would be spinning like a top with every step you took. I will skip on to my point that assuming you could precipitate Ca & Mg out of solution via electric induction (120 watt power supply) with water flowing in a 3/4" pipe at 3 GPM I would not get within 50 feet of such a device for fear it would crystallize the dissolved minerals flowing in my veins & arteries.
    The previous post by "conspiracy theory" is interesting. In a Close Loop System there may be enough time for this process to work.
    Finally, for the confused: As I tell my customers, " go with proven technology." Test your water, go with Softener that produces 800 gallons per cycle for family of 4 (500 min.). Treat the system with an Iron Out type product if you have Fe/Mg. Well users like me, Chlorinate every 2-3 years but, specific precautions required (Chlorine will ruin your Softener) get a well guy. Add a Activated Carbon tank to the system if you can afford it ( the stuff is amazing). RO in lieu of the big tank of Activated Carbon, if, yes, you can afford it. I got to get back to work. Happy Water Supply, happy life.

    0 Votes
  • Co
    conspiracytheory Nov 26, 2013

    I have seen this product used in several commercial buildings in Indianapolis, the systems were put in these buildings long after they were originally built. Anyone with good sense must understand that this product is not a water softening system, but more along the lines of a descaler. What a descaler does is to keep lime and calcium from building up on the inside of pipes and water heaters and such. The buildings I have came in contact with where this system was installed after the fact all have one major problem in common. The pipes are being (for the lack of a better word) sandblasted from the inside and eventually develop leaks and have to be replaced. This happens as the calcium and lime build up is broken loose and starts flowing through the system. This is not good if you have a closed loop heating system as the same water is continuously circulated for heating purposes.

    0 Votes
  • Tr
    truthseeker123 Jun 15, 2013

    Here is a study done by Arizona State University comparing several different water softening technologies. They concluded the TAC technologies are the most effective at removing scale caused by hard water. TAC is an acronym for template assisted crystallization. I am not a seller or proponent of any particular device or methodology. I need to buy a water softening system for a new house I just built and I am amazed at the lack of factual info available. I am still confused about what to do. The systems also seem to come with an annuity for the installer in the form of filter replacement services or other supplies. When you look at the materials used to make the filtration systems, it's clear the mark-up is really outrageous.

    0 Votes
  • Xl
    xladlk Sep 10, 2012

    I have nothing against salt based systems, had one in our last house even. Our new vacation home however uses well water which is hard and contains lots of minerals, principally iron. But the issue for us is the well only makes about 1 GPM and our water drains into a septic tank/leach field. I overcome the 1GPM with a large storage reservoir in the basement but pumping salt into a leach field just isn't a good idea. Our plumbing contractor has been pushing to install an Easywater system (yes, he gets a commission) and has worked our area (CO mountains) for 30+ years. It is a very small community where everyone knows everyone and word gets around very quickly. If the EW systems didn't do at least some good, granted, maybe not as much as a salt based system, I don't think he would still be selling them or even in business. But it all comes down to "If a salt based system is out of the question, what are the alternatives?". That is what I'm trying to ascertain.

    0 Votes
  • Ry
    Ryan1978 Aug 14, 2012
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I have had a Freije Easywater 2000 system installed in my central Indiana home since February of 2008 (Now Aug 2012). My biggest complaint up to now is that there has been no way for me to figure out if the thing is actually doing anything. My usual response when asked about it has been "well, I don't see any scale build-up on anything so I assume it is working". The unit is installed in a cellar area, and so I don't see it very often (maybe every couple of months), but every time it had the power lights on. So, I had to assume it was working. I'm guessing this is the biggest reason that people think they've wasted their money.

    The last couple of months I have noticed scale building up on my sink faucets, shower fixtures, and in the toilet bowls. I went down to the cellar, and sure enough the "overload/error" light was on. I am dealing with customer service now on getting the unit fixed, and when that happens it will be interesting to see how long before I notice the scale going away, but I'm now convinced that it was working.

    For those who are wondering, we installed the system in the house when we moved in. So, no salt system to compare it to there. However, we were on the same city water supply a few blocks away in our last house, and had a salt system. I've never noticed "silky smooth hair" or any of the other things with either system. I will say that on shower doors and things that do get mineral deposits on them they are much easier to wipe off with the Easywater system than they were with the Culligan salt system.

    0 Votes
  • De
    De82 Aug 05, 2012

    We purchased the easy water system for our new house because we were tired of the salt system. After 1 month with the easy water system there are hard water deposits on shower glass, sink fixtures and the result on my hair has been horrible. I am ready to go back to a salt system.

    0 Votes
  • Je
    jerryj10 Apr 25, 2012

    I am new and just signed up today as a (complaint) member.)
    (peoplelover) I saw your post on the (gardenweb) website regarding the (scalewatcher) unit, I sent you a message on the gardenweb website but did not hear from you, another member sent me an email saying you have all but disapeared from posting with their website. I then ran across you on this site so I thought I would try and make contact again regarding my delimma. I am interested in the scalewatcher myself and since you have had yours for some time now I was wondering if it has performed per manufacturers spefications and if you are completely happy with the scalewatcher and if not perhaps you can tell me why so I can make a better informed decision. Eagerly awaiting your reply. Thanks, jerryj10

    0 Votes
  • Ro
    Roger Ramjett Nov 02, 2011

    "Rude Man" has it right... having spent 25 yrs in aqueous chemistry (electrochemical) I have had a traditional resin-bed water softener on both coasts. It isn't that much salt (100 lbs a year) and it's reliable technology, used in labs even today in combo with RO.
    Yes, you can induce a variable current and "disassociate" ionic compounds but Ca and Mg ions have lots of opportunity to form again.. they rarely hold this charge of disassociation ... but if "peoplelover" is correct (and there is the possibility) of forming "minerals such as Ca and Mg.." and form calcium carbonate, this is exactly what we are trying to avoid... just wiki CaCO3...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_carbonate.
    There is a concept in chemistry known as "mass balance"... mass must equal going into an equation as well as exiting the equation... So, follow me... you must sequestor/chelate and remove the resultant compound, soluble or not. This is the only way water is "soft" or "conditioned", meaning the reduction/removal of these compounds...not their transformation...Period.
    If it makes people feel better... wave a wand over the hot water heater.

    1 Votes
  • Ma
    master mark Sep 17, 2011

    this product is a joke, we see them all the time... they do not work, but because people are lazy and do not want to haul salt down the stairs every few months, they convince themselves that they acutally work... People lie to themselves all the time about all sorts of things, especially when they shell out 1800 bucks and need to convince themselves that they did the right thing...

    1 Votes
  • Pe
    peoplelover Jul 29, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I am tired of so many people acusing an honest company of fraud. You electronic wizards should focus more on real world results than in Faraday’s Law or the Lorenz force (which you seem to ignore). The fact is the Easywater technology produces the advertised results in the majority of the instalations, that is why they are a growing business who advertise actively on TV. Easywater uses the same technology as Scalewatcher and here is another version of how it works: “Electronic water conditioning treats the hard water by inducing variable electric fields. This causes the dissolved minerals such as Calcium and Magnesium to crystallize and remain in suspension instead of adhering to walls of piping, faucets or heating elements of water heaters. The hard minerals now in suspension flow with the water and are discharged through the drain.” Note that the dissolved Ca++ and Mg++ are in form of ions which have an electric charge, as the electric field converts them into calcium carbonate they remain in suspension like a very thin powder with no electric charge floating away to the sewer.
    We bought our Scalewatcher system from Aqua Genesis Co in California and all the scale in showerheads and faucets disappeared within a few weeks, our water flow increased, water gets hotter faster and my hair and skin are nice and soft. We also know that Scalewatcher systems are successfully working in many cooling towers where chemical treatment is not allowed due to environmental concerns.

    -1 Votes
  • Ru
    rude man Jul 16, 2011

    The company mentions the Farady effect. As a holder of an applied physics degree from the major ivy league university I happen to know what that is. And folks, it's not magnetic, not directly. Specifically, it says that a time-variant magnetic field induces an electric field. Yes, ELECTRIC. The electric field lines are concentric within and outside the pipe if the wire is wrapped around a pipe, creating what physicists call a solenoid. Furtehrmore, if the water is ionized, there WILL be currents flowing concentrically within the pipe in the region of the wrapped wire. Hard wire is ionized. Resin-based water filters have been used for years based on this fact.
    Want to know the equation? emf = -d(phi)dt, phi = B*A where B is magnetic field strength and A the area of the circular path.
    What is the current? Just emf/resistance of a circular path.
    B is proportional to current i so i must be time-varying. The company apparently runs time-varying current thru its coils. The higher the frequency of the coil current, the higher the ion current because i ~ dB/dt so if B = B*sin(wt) then dB/dt = w*cos(wt). Physicists and engineers won't have any trouble understanding these equations.

    Now, question - does running a current thru an ionized solution neutralize that solution? I'm not a chemist but I know electrolysis separates ions into uncharged molecules, so I suppose it's at least POSSIBLE.

    My main point though it's that we're not dealing with magnetizing the water but generating an electric current in it via induction. The thing doesn't sound entirely implausible to me from a scientific viewpoint. But if water experts at universities attest to its uselessness, I would go with that. Make sure they aren't funded by the Culligan man, though! University staffs have unfortunately been wholesale corrupted, routinely publishing reports funded by special interests without disclosing the source of the funding. If you haven't seen the documentary "Inside Job" yet, do it. These guys incriminate themselves in their own words so you don't have to worry if it's propaganda.

    0 Votes
  • Ne
    Nelson Lora Jul 04, 2011

    I agree that the sponsorship of the product may be playing a part on the discussion, but in an opposite way; as expressed by- "Objective"- intent. People who vehemently dislike the likes of Hannity and Beck are a lot more militantly devoted to torpedoe any endeavor this people are envolved or related to than those who support them.
    Just a thought!

    0 Votes
  • Bo
    Bozo on the bus Jun 23, 2011

    Check out Evapco and go GoGreentechnologies then tell me if you think this doesn't work. Just another bozo on the bus.

    0 Votes
  • Ra
    Rare Wisdom Apr 13, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    If you're a home appraiser and you ask the home owner whether he likes a built in appliance, you're usually asking the home's seller. The rest of the time you are asking someone who is working to obtain a loan secured by a mortgage on the home. What's he supposed to say?

    0 Votes
  • Ne
    NeutralVote Mar 29, 2011

    You guys realize that "Animal Grandmother" and a few others actually work for Freije Easywater.

    0 Votes
  • Gt
    gtholliday Mar 21, 2011

    I don't care about reports from studies done in 1985. I'm a home appraiser in Central Indiana and come across the Easy Water system quite often, and I always make it a point to ask the home-owner what they think of it. It every case so far I've got a "love it" response. We are in hard water country in central Indiana and it seems to be working. I'm am unbiased and don't care either way, but I am checking into the system to replace my old salt system within the next year.

    0 Votes
  • Da
    daisy-dog Mar 02, 2011

    Again-
    I am a senior microwave engineer.
    I repeat-a dymamic electro magnetic field can not penetrate a metallic pipe. No less an authority than Faraday says so. Easy Water is a fraud.

    The metal pipe shorts out any electro magnetic field. So the question as to whether the field can change calcium ions is meaningless.

    Easy Water is a scam. If you bought one you are a sucker. Sorry.

    0 Votes
  • Ea
    EasyWater Customer Care Mar 01, 2011

    Hi Irmi,
    We’re sorry to hear about your experience with EasyWater. The EasyWater 2200 no-salt conditioner has an excellent track record treating tankless water heaters of all types, and we would like to reach out to you and speak with you further about the issues you have experienced. Please contact us at 877.708.3338 x101. Thank you, and we look forward to making things right for you.

    EasyWater Customer Care

    -1 Votes
  • Ir
    Irmi Feb 28, 2011

    We had an Easy Water unit installed over 2 years ago after our very old water softener started leaking, thinking the saltless feature was more environmentally responsible, cheaper to operate, and healthier than drinking salt water. Even though our plumber did an annual flush, our pipes became so built up with scale that the flow rate of our tankless water heater was so low, it often wouldn't kick on when taking a shower, unless we would turn on the water at the sink at the same time. We just now purchased a traditional water softener, and the difference is amazing. Hot showers again, with actual water pressure, no calcium deposits on the faucets, I can comb my hair easier. We definitely wasted our money with Easy Water.

    1 Votes
  • Oi
    OingoBoingo Feb 22, 2011

    I live in Ohio where we have extremely hard water and purchased a house about one year ago that has an EasyWater 2200 system in it. The previous owners had it installed at the same time as a Rannai tankless water heater. I am a chemical engineer and was totally leary about the whole thing when I saw it.
    One year in and I'm about to junk the thing and buy a salt water softener. EasyWater is an absolute scam. I figured I'd give it chance even though my brain says that scientifically there's no way it can work. I've now had plumbers come out four times to flush my pipes (every time finding scaling and deposits). I have to clean out my sink aerators weekly and clean the cartridges in my bathtubs about monthly. My Rannai also has flagged an "LC" trouble code five times in the last year - that code means "Scale Build-up in Heat Exchanger." There are water spots on all of my plates and glasses and my dishwasher (which I purchased a new one when I bought the house) is totally scaled up inside with white residue.
    I've called EasyWater and questioned them about the technology and the fact that I've had all these troubles. Their answer - it must be sand in my city water supply, which of course EasyWater doesn't address. The guy I spoke with would not (...could not?) answer ANY of my technical questions except for the same crazy balony on their website.
    BTW - EasyWater claims to use Faraday's Law to cause molecular agitation. I assume they are referring to Faraday's Law of Induction which bascially (in super simple language) says that changing a magnetic field can induce a charge. Running a magnet through a metal coil will create a charge - you can do this experiment at home (Google it). I have no clue what EasyWater is actually doing to "alter the shape of the particals" using Faraday's Law. I truly think that the EasyWater people have no clue about the field of electromanetics. But it sure sounds "scientifically sound" when presented to the general public!!

    0 Votes
  • Me
    Megalops47 Feb 11, 2011

    I find this all interesting. I just installed one of these my home which we build just over a year ago. Though I'm very skeptical, the jury is still out. I'm reading these threads trying very desparately to find a reason not to send the thing back to them when the 90 day trial is up. What I've observed so far is very simple. We are in west central Indiana and had no softner system in place prior to this EasyWater system. It's been in place since approx. mid-Jan. 2011

    My wife say's her coffee maker needs cleaned less than it did before.
    There's no noticable reduction in the amount of soap we're using.
    Spots on dishes and shower doors seem to be about the same.

    With regards to one comment that the Penn State review is 20-30 years old, someone could try to sell me a magic carpet and claiming that the science has changed since the apple hit `ol Issac Newton on the head but it just ain't so. The basic science used in the Penn State review was in place thousands of years before the review and it hasn't changed in the past 20-30 years.

    With regards to a field not penetrating a copper pipe, that's not completely accuate. Simple test... (I did this yesterday after reading the comment), take a rare earth magnet, place a piece of 1/8" thick copper over a steel drill press table and see if the magnet will stick. The strength is greatly reduced but still there. I have no idea whether the EasyWater generates a sufficient field to pass through a gnat's wing but to indicate that a field is completely blocked by any copper pipe, just isn't so. Just go to the hospital and ask your friendly MRI tech what he can do with the field generated by an MRI. That being said, I strongly doubt the EasyWater generates a sufficient field to penetrate copper pipe.

    I like technical, scientific data. I've been unable to find any on EasyWater or their kin. What little I can find strongly suggests it's bogus science. There seems to be an overwhelming reluctance to supply solid science by the manufacturers. What they offer sounds very good but, though I'm a self educated design engineer and have ran my own manufacturing business for 30 years, I have no college education. Yet I'm good enough at what I do and have picked up enough over the years to be convinced that I can put together a techical paper on any subject which would fool 90% of the population, would be completely bogus and offer more facts and sound science than anything I've heard from EasyWater.

    Had I been less lazy and just bought and installed a water softner, I wouldln't be in the experiment now. However, my wife heard about it on Hanity, called the rep. and now I'm trying it for 90 days. I'm going to give it the benefit of the doubt and see what it does.

    Feel free to contact me at [email protected] around the middle of Apr. (end of my 90 day trial) to see what I think.

    0 Votes
  • Ll
    Lloyd Feb 03, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Thank you for your kind reply. You helped me save several hundred dollars. I was really looking forward to not having to deal with heavy bags of salt anymore, which is why I tried not to beleive it was a fraud.
    Thanks again

    0 Votes
  • Da
    daisy-dog Feb 03, 2011

    I am a senior microwave engineer.
    I repeat-a dymamic electro magnetic field can not penetrate a metallic pipe. No less an authority than Faraday says so. Easy Water is a fraud.

    0 Votes
  • Ll
    Lloyd Feb 02, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I have got to ssssstop these rantings... may i be excused?

    0 Votes
  • Ll
    Lloyd Feb 02, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    It says no where that i have read that easy water is supposed to only work on metalic pipe. There is an aray of water pipe material out there. who says a magnetic field won't pass through a copper pipe? no one is claimmmmmming the coils make copper magnetic, are they?
    Well water has a very high mineral content the properties can be changed with an electromagnetic field. even minutely it make a big difference.
    By the way what type of electromagnetic engineere are you? Or are you??
    Or do you sell saltwater conditioners???

    0 Votes
  • Ma
    Mahmoud Hasaneen Jan 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Is anyone able to explain what the company chat representative was saying?

    Deanna: [9:54:58 AM] Thank you for your interest in the EasyWater system. How can I help you today?
    Lillian: [9:55:06 AM] Hello,
    Deanna: [9:55:17 AM] Hello Lillian.
    Lillian: [9:55:55 AM] Will you please explain what happens to the bio-availability of the minerals that are changed by the Easywater system so that they do not stick to pipes?
    < /span>
    Deanna: [9:57:46 AM] We are not changing the bio-availability of the minerals. The absorbability of the minerals when water is treated with the EasyWater system, will be the same as those in untreated water. We are not changing the charge on the minerals, so they will still bond with whatever they need to bond with down the line; rather, we are removing the electrostatic attraction on these minerals, to keep them from adhering to surfaces. This will not change the health or safety of your water in any way.
    Lillian: [9:58:29 AM] How is the electrostatic attraction of the minerals removed?
    Deanna: [9:59:26 AM] We use a very broad range of electronic frequencies to physically change the shape and behavior of the minerals in the water. This completely prevents the water from forming hard water scale build-up in your pipes and water-using appliances, like water heaters, dishwashers, washing machines and icemakers.
    Lillian: [10:01:15 AM] Are you able to provide me with the peer reviewed journal references that explain how the shape and behavior of the minerals is changed, but not the bioavailability?
    Deanna: [10:03:51 AM] At this time, I do not have the type of information to provide you. EasyWater technology has been used in tens of thousands of commercial and residential applications since 2001. EasyWater is installed commercially in many nursing homes, restaurants and hotels across the country. I also have an EasyWater system installed in my own home.
    Lillian: [10:05:17 AM] Can you provide me with the references which explain the shape and behavior changes? If not, would you please forward my request to the chemists or physicists who can?
    Deanna: [10:07:49 AM] EasyWater affects a physical change, not a chemical change, to the water. As the water flows through the pipe where the installation point is located it is treated with a wide range of hundreds of electronic frequencies over fractions of seconds. As those frequencies pass through the water it affects both 1) the water itself and 2) the minerals it contains. 1) Our electronic frequencies target the internal frequency of the water (which can vary based on a number of changing factors, such as pH, flow rate, temperature, etc.). Once the internal frequency is matched, the bonds which hold the clusters of water molecules together are shattered- much like a high note from an opera singer will shatter a crystal glass. The shattering of these bonds effectively creates a space within the water itself. In order to fill up that space, the water will aggressively seek to dissolve any existing deposits found within the plumbing, appliances, fixtures, etc. The treated water will gradually (over weeks or months) dissolve those minerals back into solution which results in a scale-free home. The shattered bonds also reduces the surface tension of the water which allows the water to runoff much easier and plays an important role in providing the change in the feel of the water as well as the increased lather from soaps and detergents. 2) The change to the minerals is also a direct result of the frequencies. The hardness minerals (Ca, Mg) are dendritic and have an electrostatic surface charge. Dissolved in the water, they pass through the treatment point and our frequencies effectively remove that surface charge (it has nothing to do with the valence structure of the ions themselves so there is no chemical change here). When the surface charge has been removed, the minerals gravitate toward one another and combine in large groups to form large discs within the water and consequently fall out of solution. In this state it is impossible for them to combine to form the carbonates and other compounds which make up scale. This is a temporary change and will typically last around a week (depending on applied stresses to them from turbulence, pressure and drastic change in temperature) after which the minerals and water will return to their natural state.
    [10:08:37 AM] Do you currently treat your water?
    Lillian: [10:09:47 AM] Are you able to answer my last question?
    Deanna: [10:10:29 AM] I thought I had. Any additional information, other than what I have provided you is proprietary.
    Lillian: [10:11:34 AM] You have not provided me with peer reviewed references to explain the real science behind your system, which cannot be proprietary.

    0 Votes
  • Pa
    paul 97 Jan 28, 2011

    we see them left un-plugged and abandoned every day in homes, we have customers that tell us to install a CLACK water softener and throw that junk away for them, , , , Of course, It takes them a year or two to realize that they sont work as well and never did work, but eventually they realise they were taken for a ride. Weilhammerplumbing.com is my web site and we do plumbing all around Indianapolis... we have REAL WORLD EXPERIENCE with this and everything else concerning plumbing...call me anytime for advice

    0 Votes
  • Ca
    Cateng Jan 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I agree wholeheartedly with the remarks here, with the exception of the slur on Fox viewers. Glenn Beck is the one person on any channel who insists that his viewers not believe anyone, including Glenn. He urges us to read, research, and find the truth for ourselves, because that is how we stay fully informed.

    The stations, not the faces in front of the camera, buy the advertisements and this particular one has appeared on several others.

    Because of Glenn's admonishment and my own common sense, I am on the computer today reading everything I can find on the Easy Water system. So far, I find nothing that makes me want to buy it.

    0 Votes
  • Ca
    Cateng Jan 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I do not believe the Easy Water treatment is for real. The reason being that, along with the fact that I always check products on sites like this, is that I watch Fox and especially Glenn Beck, who always says "Do not trust what anyone says, including me. Read, check it out, find out the truth for yourself." He's the only person on any channel I've heard make that statement.

    I had a person scheduled to come by this morning, but he just got a call telling him not to bother with the trip. It would be a waste of time for both of us. Thank you for the information.

    1 Votes
  • Da
    daisy-dog Jan 14, 2011

    My argument is that you can not even get an electro magnetic field to penetrate a metal pipe.
    Easy Water is a fraud.

    1 Votes
  • To
    TonyzCarz Jan 13, 2011

    There is so much mis matched information that it will make any persons head spin.. Most people arguing against the Freije sytems are trying to debate the fact that it is impossible to soften water by electromagnetic fields.. This is very true. The term "softening" is created by an ion exchange within a salt softener. The softener removes the two hardness ion and replaces them with sodium ion. The Freije system states that it does not remove minerals but changes the shape and behavior; thus creating a treated water system. The Freije System uses 100's of frequencies to treat the water, not magnetics.. big difference. The system is good at the two claims it makes: 1) It stops scale. 2) It removes scale. Take it for the facts and not opinions. I don't think they ever mentioned using "snake oil".. Must be a new emerging process.

    0 Votes
  • Bu
    butler14 Jan 10, 2011

    I looked into Easywater extensively and even called our local water treatment company. First, I am confused by many posts here. I have been on the Easywater website and have some literature from our local guy. Easywater does not claim to 'soften' the water, nor do they claim to be magnetic. It seems half the posts here are about softening.
    I have very hard water. City says it's 380 parts per million. I bought the 2200 model about a month ago from the local dealer. They guaranteed we would like the Easywater or they said they would take it out and give us a water softener.
    My wife noticed a big difference after about a week with how the water felt and in the dishwashwer.
    I guess I just wanted to say we are happy with our treatment.

    0 Votes
  • Da
    daisy-dog Dec 25, 2010

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage

    1 Votes
  • Da
    daisy-dog Dec 25, 2010

    So are you saying tha Faraday was wrong? That there is no such thing as a Faraday shield and that a dynamic electro magnetic field can penetrate a metal conductive pipe?

    1 Votes
  • Ju
    jus-sayin Dec 23, 2010

    I have read many of the comments on this and several other sights. I am by most terms, a sceptic; I weigh carefully both sides of the debate before I make a decision. The biggest aguement against the EasyWater is that one cannot wrap a wire around a metallic pipe and create a magnetic field that will alter the water. That logic would also say that gold, silver, and copper cannot be picked up/ held by a magnet and yet there is a magnet that can be made that will do just that ( the book can be found @Lindsey Publications on how to build one), it does work. That logic would also say that to make an electrical current in wiring, there has to be a positive connection, i.e. light switch, continuous wiring, etc.. However, transformers create an electric connection by induction which is the opposing current wires run in proximity to each other, there is no direct connection, and yet the voltage continues through the device (this of course has been simplified down so that all of us can understand it. Please do not act like you are correcting me by going into technical terms). I have worked in many fields of electrical, plumbing, and mechanical work over the years. I love to learn about devices and mechanisms to see how they work. I am currently a S.C. state licensed HVAC-R contractor and have personally seen many things work that according to engineers should not work. One of my uncles is an electrical engineer that had told an inventor that his device could not work due to electro-mechanical laws that have been proven over the years. This inventor had been told this by many other mechanical and electrical engineers after he had accidentally discovered that his device would work. The inventor manufactured his device and sold many of them overseas. He was not able to sell many here in the states because of scepticism. I had the destinct priviledge of meeting the inventor and testing the device. My uncle also tested the device and had to admit that it worked and yet still argued that by the electro-mechanical laws it could not work. The device was a generator that produced both AC and DC voltage for welding and electricity for jobsites that actually "stepped up" (the inventors words) the electrical output of the production generator. He further proved his device could "step up" electrical output ( produce more power than was put into it) by connecting it to an electrical outlet. We were able to use close to 45 amps of 240voltage while only using about 38 amps of 220v coming out of the wall. I would not have believed it if I had not seen it with my own eyes. My uncle and I varified the results several times. He had found a way to use available equipment; motors, generators, gear boxes, etc., to build his device.
    I also have seen where electrical motors, such as pump motors, have been grounded to copper water lines and the mineral deposits have clogged up the water line right at the point of contact. So if the deposits can be attracted, it would suffice that they could also be repelled.
    You also have to pay close attention to the verbage used for their claim on the EasyWater. They call their device a "water softener alternative" which by definition could mean that it actually does not soften the water but removes/reduces the effects of hard water. This can be acheived by altering the molecular ionic charge of the minerals in the water much the way the molecular ionic charge of water is changed to create lightening.
    I am in no way saying to go out and buy this or any other similar product, I have not tested or used this product, but there are several credible sounding consumers that say it worked for them ( results may vary is what I say), unlike the iRenew bracelet which the only people that gave positive results either had links to sights that just happened to sell the iRenew, or were not able to spell simple words, i.e. "The brasalet werkd fore me"' or "there great, i bot sevral an gave some to my famly".
    I'm just sayin'.

    0 Votes
  • Da
    daisy-dog Dec 16, 2010

    I have filed a complaint with the FTC about this fraudulent Easy Water device. I got no response. The government does not protect us. Remember how SIPIC did not stop Bernie Madoff? The same incompetent government.

    I repeat:
    Freije Easy Water is a scam. A wire wrapped around a metal pipe does exactly nothing. The metal pipe shorts out any electro magnetic field. The field can not penetrate the metal walls. Ask any electrical engineer or physicist.
    Then besides a magnetic field does not interact with calcium ions.
    So it is a two fold scam. Field does not get into pipe. If it did, field does not interact with calcium.

    1 Votes
  • Br
    Brayhaven Dec 15, 2010

    As someone who was in the water treatment industry for 30 yrs before retirement, I can tell you the Easy Water gadget is a scam, pure & simple. I've lectured engineers groups ASHRAE etc on similar technology and tested many of the magnetic & electromagnetic type devices in the lab. They usually claim some new effect their particular process has on the water flowing through the pipe. Often it's a pseudo-scientific term made up from a couple other terms :o). The key is that there must be some physical change made to the water that is MEASUREABLE downstream for the device and there is NOT. They usually depend on something called the "Hall effect" which supposedly seperates the ions momentarily as it passes the gadget and renders it less able to scale the pipes. The problem is it would take a magnet the size of a small house to render the Hall effect on a few drops of water for a very short time. It is impossible for it to occur in a flowing pipe. I've published magazine articles on magnetic effects of so-called therapeutic devices as well. Take my advice & steer clear of this quackery. The govt (truth in advertising) should shut this scam down for the public good. They already banned similar devices from displaying at govt trade shows. It's like the 100 mpg carbureter. People are always grasping for simple solutions to complex problems.. Grampa always said.. "if it sounds too good to be true... it more'n likely is " :o) Greg

    1 Votes
  • Je
    Jeff in 90620 Dec 15, 2010

    I am an electronic engineer and I don't see how this thing can work, but the coil of wire doesn't have to be a coil (e.g., an inductor) to be useful; it could be an antenna (the ground for the circuit could be in the box driving the coil).

    There are other electronic water softeners on the market that pass the water between two low-voltage electrodes. As I understand it, calcium carbonate (the chemical name for hard water) ionizes in water. When passed through electrodes that are pumping ions into the water, the chemical interaction changes so that you get calcium bicarbonate (baking soda), which doesn't leave a residue.

    However, this is a more complex installation, requiring the water pipe to be cut so that the electrode assembly can be installed.

    0 Votes
  • Mr
    MrAvagadro Dec 11, 2010

    The majority of the public is incapable of making an objective assessment of any product or claim that involves an understanding of science.
    People who spend money on a product are often subject to the placebo effect, they want to believe it works, if it does not work it means they made a bad decision.
    Anything involving magnets is capable of fooling many people.
    Anything with wires and little electronic parts can baffle the uneducated.
    If you talk about ions and molecules you can fool 99% of the public, most people do not have a clue about chemistry.
    If you link large unfamiliar, but scientific sounding words together you can impress and deceive the majority of consumers.
    Look at the fools and thieves that constantly get elected to represent us and you see the decision making ability of the populace.
    I hate to say it, but most of the people who inhabit this planet walk around completely detached from reality, there are very few people with knowledge outside of what is necessary for them to earn a paycheck, pay bills, and eat and sleep, many in fact need help to perform these simple tasks
    I believe in God for the simple fact that most people could not even perform simple daily functions without divine intervention.
    People believe what they want to believe and that can not be changed.

    1 Votes
  • Di
    Dick in the BlueRidge Dec 11, 2010

    I have wondered for a year how such a conspicuous scam as "EasyWater" could survive and how/why FOX would continue to accept money for promoting it. I make no claim to being an "expert, " but do have an electrical/electronic BS from a major state university and an MS in same from CalTech... plus 40+ years industry experience.

    The following are "facts" which I challenge anyone to disprove with credible physics, chemistry, and/or electromagnetic field theory:
    1. Electrical fields, commonly measured and described in "volts per meter" or a derivative of that (e.g., mV/meter), can not significantly penetrate copper or any other good conductor of electricity.

    2. Magnetic fields, generally measured in "gauss" (or in "Tesla" for extremely strong fields). may be generated by passing electric current ("amperes", "milliamperes" or the like) through a conductor (e.g., a wire). If that conductor with current flowing through it is wrapped in the form of a coil around a tubular core, the resulting magnetic field is concentrated within the coil. 3. If the tubular core is "ferrous" (iron or steel), the magnetic field will be concentrated in the actual iron or steel WALL of the core - NOT in its non-ferrous center, whether filled with air, water, bubblegum or whatever.

    4. If the current- conductor (wire) is wound around a NON-ferrous core of plastic, glass, paper, etc., that core is magnetically "invisible" and the resulting field is vastly weaker than with a ferrous core. Result: the magnetic field within the center of a pipe - where water might flow - can only be very weak within either a copper/iron or plastic pipe.

    5. In any case, in order to create a magnetic or electromagnetic field current must flow THROUGH the coil - "in" from a wire on one end and "out" through a wire on the other end, so to speak. A wire connected only on ONE end and wrapped around a tube will create NO - or at least negligible - magnetic field.

    Seems to me that any competent teacher/professor of physics, electrical technology, or chemistry could look at the claims of EasyWater and quickly identify them as fundamentally untenable - magic - snake oil - scam.

    1 Votes

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