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JobFox.com Resume CritiquesGeneric Computer Generated Critiques

JobFox.com provides generic critiques generated by a computer. I had the opportunity to have a critique shared with me by two of my clients. It was apparent to me that it was a form letter and computer generated, because it had the following problems:

1. Wrong job title used throughout the document in both instances.
2. Provided no real advice on how to fix the "mundane" and "flat" resumes.
3. Called the clients' experience "pudding in a cup." Yes, pudding in a cup.
4. Pulled out half of two bullet points and stated that those bullet points didn't have accomplishments in them.
5. Said that one of the clients had an objective and a career summary. The resume had niether. I would never include an objective on any resume.
6. Indicates that only entry-level candidates have an objective. Well, there is no objective and the client is an entry-level candidate.
7. Makes a point that the resumes change case and emphasis. Untrue.
8. Said the resumes do not contain keywords, when the software clearly pulls out keywords to create the "critique."
9. It's insulting to the reader and tries to convince the person that they need to spend about $400 to fix his/her resume.

Real resume writing companies, with true experts, will be comfortable showing you examples of what they can do. This company does not.

JobFox.com fails on all accounts on this one. In case you are interested I have included the information in this complaint. Below is one of the critques for a client that had two months of experience and a certification:
____________________
I'm the Jobfox resume expert that was assigned to critique your resume. I reviewed your resume with the goal of giving you an honest, straightforward assessment of your current resume, and not a judgment of your skills and qualifications. I should warn you about my style: I'm direct and to the point, so I hope you won't be offended by my comments. My perspective is that resumes get chosen, not candidates. In a perfect world, interview candidates would be selected based on their strengths and experiences. In reality, this isn't how the process works. A recruiter chooses the short list of candidates from a pile of resumes. Meaning, we have to make sure your resume does the heavy lifting in the selection process.

Here’s the good news: my first impression of you is that you are off to a good start in your career. You’re an up and coming contract management support professional, with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news: your resume isn’t doing a good job saying that to an employer. I found it to be mundane and unlikely to catch an employer’s attention. If you were selling yourself as Crème Brulee, it’s as if your resume is saying “pudding in a cup”.

Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and organizational standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting and it didn’t make me want to run to the phone to call you. These days, employers are being flooded with resumes, and we need yours to compel a hiring manager to continue reading and contact you for an interview. Countless studies have proven that resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is selected to be interviewed.

Amanda, to be honest with you, I think you should view this version of your resume as a work in progress. It's missing many key elements that we like to see on resumes at your level.

Here are the major issues I see on your resume:

VISUAL PRESENTATION

Your design is very flat and visually uneven. The appearance is not polished, and doesn’t say “experienced Contract Administrator”. By way of example, it’s like the difference between a professionally printed brochure, and one that was done at home and printed on an inkjet printer. For people at your level and experience, I’m used to seeing a much stronger visual appeal. In the real world this means your resume is at a disadvantage when the manager is culling the pile of resumes. The ideal resume format is airy, clean, and uncluttered, with the effective and strategic use of white space.

CONTENT

As I was reading your resume I was trying to imagine myself as a hiring manager, looking for that ideal Contract Administrator. I then asked myself whether I’d have picked your resume, and whether it was memorable. I concluded that much of the information was superficial and that in many instances it was too unclear. Simply put, I wouldn’t remember you. There are a lot of words on your resume, but they’re not formulated into powerful and impactful statements.

You have both an Objective and a Career summary. Having one or the other is fine, but not both. Objective statements are used often by recent graduates, so you may give the impression that you are not an experienced professional. In addition, your Career Summary is weak. It’s a critical element of your resume that should be designed to compel the hiring manager to keep reading. The purpose of this section is to define you as a professional and cover those areas most relevant to your career level and job target. By having a weak Career Summary, you are making it easier for the reviewer to say “pass” when your resume is given the customary cursory glance.

From a grammatical standpoint, I found your resume to possess many of the most common flaws. Expressions like “maintained” and “collaborated” are monotonous for the reader, and serve to repel versus attract their interest. There were some disagreements in case and punctuation and I also noticed that you often used passive language.

From the way the resume is worded, you come across as a “doer” not an “achiever”. Too many of your job descriptions are task based and not results based. Meaning they tell what you did, not what you achieved. To be effective and create excitement, a great resume helps the hiring manager visualize you delivering similar achievements at his or her company. By way of example, you can say you were responsible for managing a particular business process, or you can wow them by describing how you overhauled the process to deliver 50% higher results. Here are some examples of task based sentences in your resume.

Entered, tracked and maintained contract
Developed a comprehensive understanding
These statements are more about what you did, not what you achieved. It would be like you saying “I played tennis last week” when you could have said “I won the tennis tournament at my club last week unseating the person that held the title for the past three years.” Which sounds more impressive?

Employers want to know not only what you accomplished at your jobs, but the depth of those accomplishments. How did your work improve things, save money, etc. Employers are looking for return on investment (ROI).

Additional Issues

Also, I noticed that your resume changes emphasis patterns, which may make it difficult for some employers to follow. Successful resumes use emphasis elements in patterns that are easy for the eye to follow and that highlight the things that are most important to employers. This makes it easy for hiring executives to decide on whether to contact you or not.
It was difficult to give you a detailed critique, because your resume has limited information on your skills and achievements. Our professional resume writers can help you expand your resume so that employers have the necessary information to decide if they want to contact you.

Lastly, I'm a little concerned that you won't be found in resume databases. A well-designed resume includes the keywords and formatting that makes it easy for a resume parsing machine to learn about you and route you to a decision maker. I'm not suggesting you put a block of keywords in your resume. That just annoys recruiters. Rather, it's important that as you describe yourself, your accomplishments, and your skills, that you do it in a way that gives hints to the key word filtering system.

SUMMARY

Amanda, I’d like you to go back, reread your resume, and ask yourself whether it’s selling you short. Does it say “Amanda is a contract management support professional with tremendous expertise?” A great resume is the lynchpin in your job search, and I hate to see a strong person like you being underserved by something that’s so easy to fix.

NEXT STEPS

Most people are like you - they struggle to put themselves down on paper effectively, but that's where we come in. All the recommendations above can be combined in a cohesive, strategic manner so that you can distinguish yourself from other candidates. Our resume writers are experts in doing this. Countless studies have proven that professionally written resumes get more interviews, and, if it shortens your job search by even one day, a professional resume will pay for itself.

Purchasing the right resume writing service is important. You want to be sure you are getting everything you need to be successful in your job search without being nickel and dimed. The Jobfox Deluxe Package includes a Cover Letter (a $75 value), an Electronic Version of your resume (a $39 value), and Keyword Optimization (a $59 value). I’ve included the comparison below so you can see how the Jobfox Deluxe Package compares to other services. At $399 we are priced to be the best value service.

If you would prefer to pay in installments, we have a fantastic option that no other resume writing service provides: Six (6) payments of $69.95 per month. You will receive your professionally written resume now but have the advantage of paying for it over time.

To order your resume rewrite online, click here

Responses

  • Jm
    JM0313 Aug 20, 2014
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Oh my gosh! I got the exact same critique! I've been driving myself crazy trying to rewrite my resume according to the critique I received! Mine was through Beyond.com. I applied for a position through their website and they sent me a "complimentary critique" ! My critique said all the same things. I'm a "doer" and not an "achiever", structure is a mess.

    0 Votes
  • Co
    ConcernedRW23 May 20, 2012

    I'm so glad that this complaint received attention. I wish the company would change their ways though. It seems they still give out the faulty information, insult their customers, and collect money from unsuspecting customers. Be sure to select agree when you post a similiar complaint. The default on this site is for neutral which appears as a thumbs down for your comment.

    0 Votes
  • Fo
    formerJobFoxEmployee Feb 15, 2012
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I am a former JobFox employee (although it was Market10) back then. Any company, and there seems to be many these days, who pray on people in need should be ashamed and I hope punished for their actions. I was recently updating my resume when I came across the JobFox section and decided to do a quick search to see how the company was doing. I have to admit (and it will be clear why later) that I was amused when I saw how many people think JobFox is made up of a bunch of crooks. When I worked there (I am a software developer), the model was different than it seems to be today. Immediately, when typed jobfox into google, the autocomplete wanted to fill in many terms such as "scam", "complaint", and "class action". When you type amazon, you don't see anything like that. Doesn't surprise me at all.

    Our goal back then was to create a next generation of job matching, similar to eharmony where the applicant and employer would receive much better matches than the existing job sites CareerBuilder and Monster provide (which mainly find matches by keyword searches, at least they did then). It was also a way to prevent unqualified applicants from applying for the "CEO" opening as a selling point to employers. I was very skeptical that a candidate would really have the discipline required to spend 20 minutes or so categorizing his/her career so our match engine had the information to do its job. I would often tell my my bosses that I spent 5 minutes elsewhere and got a lot of hits whereas I haven't received one email from an actual employer via jobfox containing a matching job. Then they got pissy and told me to remove my resume from the real site. But, I trusted those with more experience in the field that we really could revolutionize job matching. After all, they were the people who started CareerBuilder and turned it into one of the 2 big players in the space and say what you want, that's a difficult accomplishment.

    The development staff worked very hard to make the user's experience and match engine as strong as possible. The first year I worked there, it was a great place. I really felt we were going to make a difference. At parties, I would tell people what we were doing and people would call me for job search advice. The crash of the early 2000's wasn't far behind. On September 11th, 2001, as tower 2 fell, I was laid off from another company after working my butt off. And when I got settled, a lot of people sent me their resumes, good people who lost their jobs because others didn't do their job. And I really felt for them and wanted to help. And I was pretty good at identifying skills, talking to our hiring managers and recruiters to find openings and I helped get quite a few people jobs. So, I took pride that at jobfox we could make a difference and help people find better jobs faster. Even if I wasn't sure the idea would work, I hoped it would and tried to do whatever I could do as a developer to make it successful.

    In that first year, I didn't really think about the other parts of the company such as marketing and the executive team although I sat very near them. But, everytime I dealt with them, I just had this suspicion that they were not very trustworthy and not to the level I expected from a staff of hand picked, startup employees (some of them, not all). These are the people who don't apply for their job but are recruited because they worked with each other. And I was one of those people and took pride that I was given a great opportunity, deserved or not. But, I didn't see them staying late every night like we did. And most of our VC money went to them and they burned thru it pretty quickly with very little to show for it. My team continued to work really hard, but one day I came in and they made some big changes to the development side. New people were brought in. And the people who brought me in and whom I believed in were set aside. Whereas, I happily worked a lot of hours and felt appreciated before (at least by the development team), we were told to work longer hours. The new CTO positioned his office so that you had to walk past him when you left the facility and he would give you a dirty look. Seriously, is this seventh grade? We were working hard, not smart and we just kept rewriting the application for the sake of changing it. I rarely thought the ideas we were implementing were good ones. We'd work past midnight to deliver a build ontime and the next day, we wouldn't be thanked or told to take a long weekend and see our family, we'd be told we were not working hard enough. And the new task would be to completely rip apart what we had just slaved over and completely redo the application to implement the next, great idea. One of these ideas was to create a bunch of emails designed to drive people to the site. I know this seems obvious now but at the time, most companies didn't have this feature in their email. These emails were signed by someone with a big title that didn't exist..."A phantom. An apparition. Second cousin to Harvey the Rabbit. I conjured him out of thin air. He doesn't exist... except on paper" to borrow a great quote. Something such as Thomas Cronkite, Vice President of Job Recruiting. The content didn't so much matter, it had to be really easy for the user to get to the site from these fabricated emails. They didn't contain the blatant lies that the emails people on this site are complaining about, but it was a step in that direction. I felt squirrely implementing them. They wouldn't have been as offensive to me if these form letters (with sections replaced with personalized content to seem legit) led to people getting jobs, but if the idea worked, I don't think they would be scamming people into paying $400 for a computer to analyze their resume. And I wasn't comfortable with this and just didn't trust the people I worked for, so I left. I think all the people I respected have since left also. I know, boo hoo me, there are much worse business practices in the world so grow up. I realize this but ultimately, I have to believe in the people I work for/with.

    And a lot of the signs I saw along the way that made me wonder about the ethics of the marketing and executive team turned out to be real. I really think it's pathetic to ask someone to pay for a service, claim the service is an actual person and an expert (maybe a lawyer can prove nothing in the emails really says that but they seemed to intentionally fool people). And then parse the person's resume and reformat it as it sounds like they are doing and ask for more money to be put in the front of the queue for job openings. I can imagine the decisions people make in desperate times, hoping to catch a break. At the time, we didn't parse resume's and uploading a resume was not a big part of the application. It wasn't a person's resume that was important, it was the taxonomy of their work experience that was important. I tried to push parsing a person's resume to help them fill out their "match", help cut down that 20 minutes it took before you could view postings. The taxonomy and questions were complex and users had trouble doing it accurately as did the employers and if this information wasn't reliable, our match couldn't improve anything. You know what they say about garbage in.

    Asking, presumably, an unemployed person to fork over $400 seems like a desperate act. Don't get me wrong, I realize that there are many experts who really do take poorly written resumes and improve them (I've had this done myself) and are likely an essential part of their clients' finding good jobs. But, this wasn't "the big idea" that we, or at least I tried to make come true. There was always talk that if the match engine doesn't work, there's another, almost fool proof idea we could develop. Perhaps this was their big idea all along. But, I never would have worked for them if I knew their plan was to take the last $400 from millions of people desperately seeking a job. And I really believe this is deliberate. The people who founded CareerBuilder had plenty of money when they were bought out, millions but not billions. The idea just doesn't seem "scalable" to me unless, as it appears, the expert is an automated engine, reformatting thousands of resume's a day or a minute or a second for $400 a pop rather than hiring a huge staff of experts to rewrite resumes and spend the time it takes to do it properly. I'm not trying to offend anyone because I think a person who spends his/her time really helping someone get a job is doing a great service. But, the people who founded CareerBuilder, in my opinion, want to build something that puts CareerBuilder and Monster out of business and I think they are arrogant enough to believe people are not smart enough to recognize a form letter. Or maybe they do and they just figured they'd lawyer up and still make billions. Those were our competitors at the time (although, I'm sure they were not scared of us). I didn't get the impression things ended well when CareerBuilder was bought out. The people there seemed to hate them. And there was certainly a competitive spirit that we could do a better job than the giants.

    I really didn't want this to come off as a disgruntled employee trying to get revenge on a former employer. I almost never think about jobfox. I really wanted to say that as a former employee, I don't agree with the tactics they seem to use. And if they really do a good job and don't deliberately rip people off, it wouldn't be the first suggestion that pops up. And as a once insider, it doesn't surprise me they lowered themselves to praying on those in a bad situation, just hoping to catch a break. To all of you still looking for that special job, I really hope you find it. You spend almost half your conscious, adult life working and you should love what you do. It makes all the difference. Good luck on you complaints and your search.

    1 Votes
  • Na
    Navet Jan 05, 2012

    I just received mine and the wording is 90% or more to the one you posted. Lucky for me I decided to double check their authenticity as I was prepared to pay them to redo mine since I really need a job. Thank you so much for these posts, they are eye openers. I feel so defeated now that I think, here we are trying to gain employment whilst there are people out there trying to rip off the unemployed. What a damn shame!

    1 Votes
  • No
    Not by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin Nov 26, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I received my free critique and alas, like many of you, I'm a doer, not an achiever. I was feeling like a loser based in their critique, but after reading/scrolling through all of the pages on here, I'm glad to see I'm in good company. I was offered their service for $399 or six easy payments of $59. Thank goodness for everyone who has posted their experience!

    1 Votes
  • Br
    BrandyVic Nov 07, 2011

    Well, I feel better knowing that I'm not the only one who is a "doer." LOL! Looks like after two years, the resume critique is still the same. BTW, $329 is currently the discount price, which is far from a discount to me.

    1 Votes
  • Wa
    Waterbug656 Oct 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Yes, I got the same email. And, I keep getting spam emails about specials. I was thinking about trying it, but now that I read this page, I def will not. I went to see a resume writer at my college for free. Still looking for a job.

    0 Votes
  • Ko
    ko77 Oct 21, 2011

    Got many of the same critiques mentioned above, word for word.
    THANK YOU for saving me $400 and GOOD LUCK in the class-action suit!

    1 Votes
  • Su
    Suzanne Werden Sep 19, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I was able to reach the resume department but it was by accident because I was trying to reach accounts receivable. The person who answered the resume line - Madaline - seemed confused and upset that I was able to reach her. I told her my complaint and stated she should be embarrassed to work for the company.

    1 Votes
  • Su
    Suzanne Werden Sep 19, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    A class action suit has been ititiated against Jobfox and their resume practices - with any luck we will recover the money we have lost.

    1 Votes
  • St
    Stay Positive Sep 19, 2011

    I, too, received the aforementioned JobFox email critiquing my resume. Here is their MO... they begin by telling you they are going to be brutally honest because they truly want to help you find a job. Next, they state something positive about your skills/qualifications to try to hook you in emotionally, and then they let you have it. They rip apart every other piece of your resume leaving you feeling deflated and inept. But wait, they have a solution... shell out $350 of money you don't have, which is why you are currently searching for a job, and they will make it all better. What's that... you don't have $350... well, why don't you break it up into 6 easy payments. This is a shameful ploy to take advantage of good people who are trying to find work in this difficult economy. To those of you reading these comments, stay positive and believe in yourselves. Do not let the JobFox critique poison your outlook. I wish you all the best of luck in your job search!

    1 Votes
  • Co
    CompletelyRelieved Aug 30, 2011

    Thanks for the posts everyone, you guys saved me $400. Hopefully, we can keep this thread going to save more people!

    1 Votes
  • Ho
    Houston77 Jul 26, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Unfortunately I didn't read this before shelling out the $400. Like an idiot, I asked for their help. Later that day I received an introduction email from a women named Lisa saying she had been assigned my resume and would be sending me a draft in the next few days. It has been more than a week and not only haven't I recieved the draft, but she also has not responded to any of my posts asking for an eta. Definitely a scam.

    1 Votes
  • Dr
    Dr.Stew Jul 25, 2011

    Same cut-copy-paste critique here. Recieved after submitting a professionally created resume.
    My reviewer was a (presumably ficticious) Neil Bradley. I called asking for him. There was a brief pause and a hurried "Actually he was just promoted and he is out of the office." Has anyone else tried contating thier supposed reviewer by telephone and reieved a similar response?

    1 Votes
  • Me
    Menright Jul 07, 2011

    Watch out people cause they are still scamming. I got a "review" yesterday with the same form letter and wording already mentioned here. Glad I did not send money before I researched the company!

    1 Votes
  • Th
    TheWiser Jul 04, 2011

    Has anyone come across any legitimate resume writing companies that they would recommend? I too received a critique from JobFox that's almost identical to the critique provided above. Thanks for posting!

    1 Votes
  • Re
    RenssRat Apr 28, 2011

    Thank goodness I thought to Google JobFox's resume' writing service to see what other people had to say about it. Like many others on this board, I also received the standard computer-generated "critique" and the sales pitch. I just saved myself $350 (they were offering 30% off with 6 mo. installments). $350 is a LOT of money to spend and I could never be sure that what I would get back was really worth it, so I decided to search for reviews online. THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO POSTED THEIR EXPERIENCE WITH JOB FOX!
    Anne P.

    1 Votes
  • Le
    Leora12 Apr 27, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Not sure why my previous complaint entry came out with a typo in it. It should say ...Glad I found this complaint board and didn't fall for Job Fox's scam.

    1 Votes
  • Le
    Leora12 Apr 27, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I got the same letter. Mine was from someone named Bridget Hart. Glad found this complaint board and didn't fall for it.

    1 Votes
  • Is
    isabellaswan Apr 17, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Any person who has any savvy at all knows that a company who creates web pages to tout themselves i.e., doesn't include ONE complaint just glowing reviews is a company desperate enough to push themselves to the top of the ladder to further mislead seekers. Jobfox has gotten mostly negative reviews from users for a long time. It is a long established business standard that says if ANY company has to create multiple websites to make themselves look good, they are truly f**ked. Jobfox did just that. It was obvious from the day they tried to beat out the fact that "SCAM" was what Google was returning when someone looked up Jobfox. Seeing what they have done shows how pathetic they are but mostly how much people hate them. If you try to write a negative comment on any Jobfox site, you will never see it... EVER ... posted. What will hopefully happen is that no person will see that a company that isn't Zappos or Amazon will never have all positive comments. Jobfox won't even entertain that and in doing so they have made themselves look like bigger losers than they already are.

    1 Votes
  • Bk
    bkell Apr 11, 2011

    My feelings exactly! I was directed to Job Fox when I applied for a position listed on another site. To obtain information on the job itself I had to sign up with Job Fox and upload my resume. One day later I received an e-mail with the same nonsense about how the resume was flat and uninspiring. I e-mailed them back and told them bluntly that they were only interested in having desperate job seekers part with their money. They quickly replied claiming that all they were interested in was get me back to work. My next move was to unsubscribe. I find it interesting that their CEO is the guy who founded Career Builders

    1 Votes
  • Su
    Suzanne Werden Apr 10, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I would love your help - have you noticed that when you Google Jobfox now they have taken up the first page with almost all positive stuff moving the negative to pages 2 and on so I think my little campaign is starting to work. But obviously I need some more wind in the sails to get this going. I am currently working on a web page to start the class action sign up sheets - I think I have a lawyer who will take it on once we have the signatures. Please email me at [email protected] so we can get the Twitter campaign going. Thanks

    3 Votes
  • Is
    isabellaswan Apr 10, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Suzanne, I suggest you go onto twitter and launch a campaign of negative press to Jobfox. Encourage others to RT and make sure they are given the bad press they deserve. Suggest:
    @Jobfox is a fraud! Don't sign up or you will REGRET it!

    also include this complaints board link so people can see.
    You can also do another tweet from thewordcynic.com (check out the 100s of complaints) and http://thecomplexmedia.com/blog/?s=jobfox

    keep tweeting and asking for RTs. I'll help if you need me to.

    2 Votes
  • Su
    Suzanne Werden Apr 07, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Tell me about it - I am serious about the class action suit but we need at least 50 individuals - this is just plain fraud for anyone who has already paid and did not get the service they agreed to. From the looks of this site there are at least 50 who have been bilked out of their money.

    2 Votes
  • Pa
    Patsy Teresa Apr 07, 2011

    I received the same canned email from Jobfox regarding my resume. Before I spent $400 I did a lot of research on the company and found numerous complaints from several websites. I also received another email from Jobfox this morning stating they would give me a discount of $200 off their resume writing service and that I could pay a lump sum payment or pay the fee in 6 installments. Do not be misled by their emails and or advertisements. They only want your money and will give you nothing in return.

    1 Votes
  • Su
    Suzanne Werden Apr 04, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Is any one else on this board interested in a class action suit against Jobfox for the money they were bilked out of. If so please contact me at [email protected] I refused to pay midway due to their substandard services and now they have forwarded the balance to a collection agency who affected my credit report negatively. Really sad to take advantage of individuals seeking employment.

    2 Votes
  • Pi
    Piper2411 Apr 02, 2011

    In short, I took the bait and have paid numerous payments of $69.95 for nothing to speak of. I was told by one potential employer that my 'new and improved Jobfox resume' was confusing. I ended up "fixing" it myself, and I still have the same job I had when I first used Jobfox more than a year ago, and I am far from an entry level manager. I have more that 10 years experience in management with increasing responsibility, proven results, etc. Fortunately, one of my bonuses from my current job helped offset the money I wasted, but then again the money spent on Jobfox could have gone toward a charity or a pair of new shoes, or a day at the spa. Do you feel my regret...my pain? There is nothing like getting got by one of these scams when you are looking for legitimate help breaking out of the box.

    1 Votes
  • Is
    isabellaswan Feb 28, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    You are not alone. They are a scam.

    1 Votes
  • Lu
    luckycat1709 Feb 28, 2011

    Thank to everyone who posted here, you saved me a lot of money. I thought the text sounded canned and now I know it was. Below is my critique and you can see the name of the write is different but the comments are the same. I especially love the part about my contact information not being easy to find since it is clearly at the top of both pages of my resume! What a scam!

    From: Bridget Hart
    Subject: Your Jobfox Resume Critique

    You requested a critique while visiting Beyond.com (or one of their affiliates).

    Dear XXXXXXX,

    I'm the Jobfox resume expert who was assigned to review your resume, and I specialize in reviewing resumes for candidates who are high-income earners or executives. I evaluated your resume with the goal of giving you an honest, straightforward assessment of your current resume, and not a judgment of your skills and qualifications. I should warn you about my style: I'm direct and to the point, so I hope you won't be offended by my comments. I enjoy working with clients at your level because the impact my recommendations can have on shortening your job search or helping you land a higher paying job is astounding. My clients generally assume that their resumes are in great shape. After all, it has served them well in the past. But at your level, and in this economic climate, the competition for the best jobs is tougher than ever and using anything less than an outstanding resume is a mistake.

    So, let’s get started on reviewing your resume:

    Here’s the good news: My first impression of you is that you have an impressive array of skills and experiences. You’re a qualified retail management professional with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news: Your resume does not pass the 30-second test, and the content is not up to the standards one would expect from a candidate like you. Countless studies have proven that resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is selected to be interviewed. Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and overall writing standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting, and it didn’t make me want to run to the phone to call you. In short, your resume is effectively sabotaging your job search.

    Michael, your resume is missing key elements that we see on the best resumes at your level of experience.

    Here are areas for improvement on your resume:

    Your resume's visual presentation

    The resume I am viewing for your critique is in plain text format, so I will only make one comment on the visual presentation. I do, however, have more than enough information to comment on the content, sequence, and grammatical elements and they are the most important factors to consider in a resume. Regarding the text version of your resume, it looks like you converted it from another file format and did not delete the extraneous characters. I recommend you create a cleaned up text version of your resume that can be used on sites that require you to cut and paste your resume into a form or upload a text version. I assume you have a Word version of your resume that you use for interviews and uploading to sites that accept Word. If you have a Jobfox profile, be sure to upload the Word version. It will be typically much more visually appealing to employers when you have designed it correctly.

    The content of your resume

    As I was reading your resume, I was trying to imagine myself as a hiring executive, looking for that ideal retail management professional. When I reviewed your resume, I asked myself if I could easily pick out your key attributes, experience, skills and accomplishments. A recruiter will do this to quickly decide if you’ll be successful in the job they have open. When I read your resume, the answer to that question was “no.” Here is one of the reasons why:

    Your career summary is weak. It’s a critical element of your resume that should be designed to compel the hiring manager to keep reading. The purpose of this section is to define you as a professional and cover those areas most relevant to your career level and job target. By having a weak career summary, you are making it easier for the reviewer to say “pass” when your resume is given the customary cursory glance.

    From the way the resume is worded, you come across as a “doer, ” not an “achiever.” Too many of your job descriptions are task-based and not results-based. This means that they tell what you did, instead of what you achieved. This is a common mistake for non-professional resume writers. To be effective and create excitement, a great resume helps the hiring executive “envision” or “picture” you delivering similar achievements at his or her company. Here are some examples of task-based sentences in your resume:

    Provided high level P&L analysis to aid Territory Leaders in achieving KPIs within their assigned areas
    Supported Eastern division: 2 VPs of Operations, 6 Territory Leaders and 107 stores
    Employers want to know about your previous contributions and specifically how you’ve made a difference. More importantly, they want to know how you are going to make a significant difference at their company.

    When I read your resume, I didn’t find compelling language that brings your work to life. I saw many passive words and non-action verbs. Phrases like “provided” and “served as” are overused, monotonous, and add no value to your resume. Strong action verbs, used with compelling language to outline exemplary achievements, are essential parts of a well-constructed resume.

    Now, let’s put it all together. Here’s a real life example taken from a former client’s resume. By changing the language, we helped improve the perception of the candidate.

    Passive language/ Doing: Responsible for managing national marketing plans
    Action language/ Achieving: Maintained full responsibility for creating and managing national marketing initiatives that boosted revenue levels by 50% within multiple organizations
    A change like this makes a dramatic improvement. I hope you can see the difference when we implement action verbs, achievements, and results.

    It’s easy to overlook errors in your resume. They could be typographical errors, inconsistent verb tenses, grammatical errors, punctuation problems, or misspelled words. You’ve rewritten the resume and proofed it multiple times so you may not notice the issue. But errors can be the kiss of death for your resume. Recruiters are reading your resume with fresh eyes, and they’re experts at finding errors. A misspelled word or punctuation error may not seem like a big deal, but to an employer these errors demonstrate unprofessionalism and a lack of attention to detail. That’s not the impression you want to leave. I spotted at least one of the above-mentioned errors on your resume.

    Additional Issues

    • You want to make sure that employers can easily read and locate your name and contact information so that they can reach out to you directly when they are interested. If an employer has to hunt for your contact information, or if contact information is missing, your resume could be overlooked.

    My recommendation

    Your resume is not doing you justice. Consider making the investment in having your resume professionally written and formatted. Let our 100k+ and executive resume experts incorporate all the best practices that will help you sell your capabilities and maximize your compensation. The high level managers who will review your resume will be sophisticated and discerning, and you cannot afford to have an average resume. You need to stand out to win an interview slot for the jobs you want.

    Putting your best resume forward now is critical. The sooner you invest in having your resume professionally written, the faster you increase your odds of landing a job you really want. Once your old resume goes into a company’s database or starts to circulate in your network, it’s hard to pull back, and it could affect your candidacy for future openings. You will be amazed when you see the difference our professional resume experts can make in presenting your credentials.

    Many people ask a friend or colleague to help them write a resume. Sadly, unless they are an experienced, certified resume writer, this is usually a fatal mistake. The way hiring companies process resumes has changed dramatically. Many employers now use electronic tools to capture, evaluate, and screen their incoming resumes. In this environment, a resume must be constructed with the right structure, keywords, and format to be “processed” properly by a resume tracking system. It needs to be designed to be found, selected, and tracked for a hire to happen. This is known as keyword optimization, and most non-professionals are not well-versed in this important technique.

    As I’m sure you know, be certain to send a cover letter when you forward your resume directly to a recruiter or hiring executive for a specific job. A well-written cover letter can give you a valuable edge over other candidates with similar skills. It’s the best way to make a memorable appeal that grabs attention and personally links you to the job. Use it to explain why you are uniquely qualified for the specific role. Jobfox can craft a custom cover letter that distinguishes you from the crowd (and it’s free when you purchase a professionally-written and formatted resume.)

    1 Votes
  • Di
    Dimps143 Feb 13, 2011

    I usually do a research on site before spending anything and i am thankful to everyone on this discussion board and especially to members of Complaint Boards to provide detailed insights of this company and the likes. Saved lots of bucks!! :-)

    1 Votes
  • Gl
    GloriaBB Jan 31, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    Thank you all for posting your experience with JobFox. I received exactly the same letter. However, I did not fall for it because I had my resume seen by a resume writer. This is such an unethical practice!
    If you really want to improve your resume, I suggest a book by Robin Ryan, the title is "Winning Resumes" you could check it out from a public library, is totally no brainer and step by step and it did make a difference in the number of responses I got from recruiters, ( AND YOU DON'T HAVE TO SPEND 400 DOLLARS!) I am still looking for jobs, the competition is fierce but keep trying. Good luck !

    1 Votes
  • Is
    isabellaswan Jan 27, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    For all of you $400 richer, spread the word about the JF services/scam. My friend had the people at JF re-write her resume and it did not get her any leads or any responses that Jobfox promised. As an experiment she submitted the resume that Jobfox re-wrote for her as a different user and GUESS WHAT???? they sent the same critique of a resume they wrote saying she should use their services. When she emailed the resume writer she never got a response.

    1 Votes
  • 40
    400.00 richer Jan 23, 2011
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    I am so glad I checked into this company. I cant believe the tactics they use to bully people into buying their resume services. Thank God for the resume templetes in Microsoft Word saves you from shelling out $400.00 for this mindless piece of crap service.

    1 Votes
  • Jo
    JohninTX Dec 31, 2010

    I just found JobFox and got a similar critique on my resume. In my numerous years of putting out resumes and looking for work, I have never found anyone who agrees on what a resume should have and how it should look. So paying someone to fix it is a total scam and waste of money.

    1 Votes
  • Is
    isabellaswan Nov 29, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    JOBFOX IS A SCAM
    DO NOT USE JOBFOX
    DO NOT OPEN AN EMAIL FROM JOBFOX.

    1 Votes
  • Lc
    LCM17 Nov 09, 2010

    All I can say is wow. I had my resume constructed with the support of a career transition advisor. Granted, not a professional resume writer, but her skills showed through in a number of ways. When I got the review of my resume I was floored and started to question the quality of my resume, despite a few calls I have received from prospective employers. I was minutes away from purchasing Jobfox's second and lowest offer of $299.
    I cannot express how glad I did a search and found so many people willing to take the time to share their experience. I had the same wording, structure and comments as many of the examples listed. Too bad because aside from some of the errors, they have a compelling sales pitch. Thanks everyone for speaking out.

    1 Votes
  • Jo
    jobseeker25 Nov 07, 2010

    I was thinking of getting a resume done myself and googled to find samples...just like all of you, I came up empty handed and ran into this forum. Thanks! Suggestion to everyone though, when jobfox asks you to evaluate your skills for each job in their questionnaires, it may be beneficial to use the the descriptions that they have there. They put their writing out for free w/o realizing it.

    1 Votes
  • An
    Annoyed Teacher Nov 03, 2010
    This comment was posted by
    a verified customer
    Verified customer

    LOL. Yep...jobfox is full of $#!t! Same BS critique as everyone else here. The error on jobfox's part was my resume was professionally proofread by my field department Dean of my University and they gave it the same cookie cutter rubber stamp of rejection as everyone else. I don't know about most of you folks, but I am not able to stop their scam emails. The discontinue service to our service link is dysfunctional as well as many other links on their site (in other words, it's written there in stone now). The [censor] been sending me last day BS notices everyday for the last month flooding my email despite even putting "Jobfox, Job Fox" or any other variation third party affiliation in my treat as spam blocker within my browser security. If "Ya'll" are feeling this mess perhaps we should petition the Attorney General or FCC or whoever to extricate them from further commercial deceit. Just my thought on the matter.

    0 Votes
  • Kl
    kljl Nov 02, 2010

    Jobfox is a total scam. should have spend that money elsewhere :(

    1 Votes
  • Ma
    MaggieC36 Nov 02, 2010

    I am so glad I decided to research JobFox on Google. I received the standard computer generated letter this morning and have felt so depressed that I had a "simplistic in design" resume and I did not pass a "30 second interest test that would make a hiring manager pick up the phone and call me for an interview." Now I feel proud that I did not let a computer prey on my insecurities and hand over $400.00.
    I will find a great job and I will not be defeated by a computer generated "cry for money"!

    1 Votes

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