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Toys ‘R Us / the group interview was awful

United States

The group interview was awful! We had to do a partner activity where we had to tell each other why we “deserve” to work for Toys ‘R Us and tell it to the Human Resources (HR) Manager. Then, we got called in one by one for individual interviews, where we were asked the same question. The individual interviews were with the individual, the HR Manager, and some other manager, who looked like Guy Smiley from Sesame Street with giant, white pieces of Chicklets gum for teeth! If you’re too dumb to figure out why people want to work for your company, you shouldn’t be working!

The orientation was even worse. We watched an hour and a half of videos, filled out paperwork, and got a “grand” tour of the store. The best part of the whole orientation was the video on Code Adam (finding a missing kid in a store program). When it came time to ask questions, the HR Manager (who was running orientation) couldn’t even give a straight answer to anyone’s question.

I did a bit of research on my own about the company and tried to find straight answers to questions I had. What I learned horrified me the most. Even though the employee handbook and the orientation videos say that employees are supposed to be honest and report dishonesty and not “trash talk” the company, the company is intentionally misleading customers, employees, potential hires, and investors. As of this posting, Toys ‘R Us is $5.12 billion in debt. They have carefully tried to hide this fact.

According to the CEO, if they don’t meet or exceed their Holiday Sales numbers they had prior to the recession, the company could go out of business entirely. His plan is to meet or exceed the Holiday Sales numbers, instead of finding other ways to reduce the debt. How are they supposed to even pay their employees with that much debt? Employees, investors, potential hires, and customers should be worried about what will happen if Toys ‘R Us don’t meet or exceed Holiday Sales numbers this Holiday season. What should potential hires and employees do if they know this? Stay silent?

This is truly a strange and somewhat scary experience. What is someone to do with something like this?

Mo

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