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Pass-Guaranteed / Their refund policy is a scam

1 United States Review updated:
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Pass-Guaranteed.com did not honour their refund policy on the Microsoft practice exam questions I purchased!

On March 10th, 2008 I purchased exam questions for Microsoft exams 70-292 and 70-296. These two exams are needed to upgrade my MCSE 2000 certification to MCSE 2003. I have purchased exams before mainly because of the pass-guaranteed.com refund policy. I was expecting to receive the same quality I had come to expect from my past purchases at pass-guaranteed, but unfortunately I was quite disappointed after installing the exam engine. Despite the horrible quality graphics, the typos in every questions, all True/False questions being True, and other questions that were just wrong in the testing engine I decided to give it a go and continue to study using pass-guaranteed.com's testing engine. On March 31st, 2008 I failed both exams...the first certification exams I have ever failed.

Obviously I was frustrated at failing the exams, but I knew I could take them again, and I also knew I could get my money back from pass-guaranteed because of the pass-guaranteed refund policy. Or so I thought! I sent an email on April 3rd, 2008 to techsupport@pass-guaranteed.com asking for a refund based on the quality of the pass-guaranteed.com testing engine and the fact I failed the two exams. I also provided them with a scanned copy of the failed exam printout from the Prometric testing center. Here is the link to the Pass-Guaranteed.com 100% Money-Back Guarantee so you can see for yourself, and you can see why I had no doubt I would receive a refund. On Saturday April 5th, 2008 I received a response from Michael S. at pass-guaranteed.com stating I would not be receiving a refund because they "...have had great feedback with regards to the 70-292 and 70-296". What?!?!?! I went back and looked at the pass-guaranteed.com refund policy again just to make sure I wasn't missing anything. I couldn't find anywhere on their guarantee page that stated the customer will receive a refund except if we have great feedback about the exam they are requesting a refund for. Here is the extent of the refund qualification..."If any registered customer fails the exam once within 180 Days after your order purchase date, you will get a full refund for the total purchase price." Oh and these too... 1) Pass Guaranteed has the right to ask you to fax or mail the transcript if we think necessary. 2) Your 100% Money Back Guarantee applies to our Practice Exam Test Questions only, and not any of the Online Course Tutorials, Study Guides or Lab Scenarios.

I was on vacation during some of my responses and couldn't wait to get back and put this page together. I will be satisfied if I convince at least one person not to purchase any certification exam questions from pass-guaranteed. Before sitting down to write this I contacted PayPal to see if maybe they would hold pass-guaranteed responsible for their 100% Money-Back Guarantee scam. Unfortunately after filing a claim I received an automated response from PayPal saying their claims process only applies to shipment of goods. But it does state that the claim has been noted in the profile of the PayPal user you reported. Nice! So if you find this page after you have been scammed by pass-guaranteed.com and you purchased their product with PayPal, please file a claim with PayPal. Maybe we can at least make it more difficult for pass-guaranteed to process payments.

In my research of pass-guaranteed.com I came across an interesting link, apparently I'm not the only one who has experienced the pass-guaranteed.com refund policy scam. I was also trying to gather information about the company behind pass-guaranteed.com, Global Certification Courseware Ltd. Guess what, they don't have a real physical address! Well maybe they do, but it isn't listed anywhere on the Internet. According to their website the corporate headquarters is located at Suite 18 Shearway Business Park Folkstone • Kent CT19 4RH • UK. But that appears to actually be a management company of some sort, because there are multiple business listed at the same exact address. You can do a quick Google search using that address and see what I'm talking about. The development they say is their headquarters belongs to Glenmore Investments. I wonder if Glenmore Investments knows they are leasing space to a company which represents another company which is ripping off customers in the US?

Va
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Comments

  • Ga
      1st of May, 2008
    0 Votes

    Hi, I am the President of Pass-Guaranteed.com. Regarding this issue relating to the 70-292 and 70-296 practice exams, this customer did contact us. We did not receive any failed transcripts from this customer. According to our refund policy, you have to provide failed transcripts within 180 days after your purchase date to be eligible for a refund.

    With regards to stating to the customer that they will not be receiving a refund, this was true because we did not receive any failed transcripts from this customer. The customer was just asking for a refund without providing us with the required documentation which is to send us a scanned copy of his failed transcript.

    This customer has used our products before and has not had any issue’s with other practice exams that he has purchased up until now. We did not receive any of the failed transcripts that this customer claimed he has sent. We have a very good name in the industry and we do not in any way scam any of our customers! We have been in business for sometime now and we never rip off any of our customers. With regards to our
    location, yes, this is our office in the UK and you can also call us at: +44 7003 401203.

    After this report, we have emailed the customer to provide the failed transcripts. After emailing the customer to provide the failed transcripts, the customer responded with his failed transcripts and we
    have now refunded the customers purchase which falls under our 100% Money Back Guarantee policy.

    We rarely have customers requesting a refund and I have to say that this is one of the first times I have heard a customer doing two exams in one day. Yes, this customer wrote 2 exams in one day. I strongly feel that the customer was not fully prepared in writing the 70-292 and 70-296 exams and rushed his studies to prepare for both these exams on the same day! Anyone who has studied for one of these exams before will surely agree.

    We have had many customers that have passed the 70-292 and 70-296 exams with the help of our practice exams. This customer purchased other products from our company before and did not have any problem before, I think he rushed these two exams and this is the reason for his failure.

    This issue has now been resolved and the customer has now been refunded after we have now received the failed transcripts. I don’t know if this is some other company (vendor) trying to hurt our name but I can assure
    you that we are in no way a scam company that this customer claims. We have been in business since 2002 and this is the first I have seen a report of this nature.

    I am sure you know every single business in the world receives complaints. We do care on how our customer’s feel about our services and our products and we welcome all customer feedback.

    Regards,
    Gary Margrave

  • Va
      5th of Jun, 2008
    0 Votes
    Pass-Guaranteed - They do not honor their refund policy
    Pass-Guaranteed
    United States
    www.pass-guaranteed.com

    I have been trying since the end of March 2008 to get a refund from Pass-guaranteed.com. I have not gotten any replies even when I called their UK number. I get a harried woman who will only pass on my complaint. I have complied with their requests for refund processing but they have not even bothered to reply to any of my emails, calls, etc. I am now trying to go to a UK version of the BBB to seek satisfaction. Their refund policy is worthless. Do NOT use them if you expect to get your money back!

  • Ow
      12th of Feb, 2009
    0 Votes

    Dear Customer,

    It seems like this is another post once again with a competitor trying to destroy our name. If you did indeed order this product, what is your order number or receipt id for this purchase? Anybody can file a complaint on /link removed/ and bash any company name.

    Regards,
    Vincent. S

  • Po
      6th of Jul, 2009
    -1 Votes

    Everybody knows what it's like to feel anxious—the butterflies in your stomach before a first date, the tension you feel w hen you are about to take an exam, the way your heart pounds if you're in danger. Anxiety rouses you to action. It gears you up to face a threatening situation. It makes you study harder for that exam, and keeps you on your toes when you're making a presentation. In general, it helps you cope. But if you have an anxiety disorder, this normally helpful emotion can do just the opposite—it can keep you from coping and can disrupt your daily life. Anxiety disorders aren't just a case of "nerves." They are conditions, often caused by stressful events in and life experiences of the individual, and effected by an individual's biological make-up. There are several types of anxiety disorders, each with its own distinct features. An anxiety disorder may make you feel anxious most of the time, without any apparent reason. Or the anxious feelings may be so uncomfortable that to avoid them you may stop some everyday activities. Or you may have occasional bouts of anxiety so intense they terrify and immobilize you. Many people misunderstand these disorders and think individuals should be able to overcome the symptoms by sheer willpower.

    More information on anxiety can be found on the Mental Help Net website.
    Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    "I just can't seem to stop worrying. Sometimes I feel okay, but then the smallest thing can set me off and I can't get my mind to stop. I feel tense and jumpy and can't do anything to get my mind to relax. Often I get headaches which just makes everything feel even worse. Then if on top of everything, I can't sleep, I feel like I'm about to crack."

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is much more than the normal anxiety people experience day to day. It's chronic and exaggerated worry and tension, even though nothing seems to provoke it. Having this disorder means always anticipating disaster, often worrying excessively about health, money, family, or work. Sometimes, though, the source of the worry is hard to pinpoint. Simply the thought of getting through the day provokes anxiety. People with GAD can't seem to shake their concerns, even though they usually realize that their anxiety is more intense than the situation warrants. They often have trouble falling or staying asleep. Their worries are accompanied by physical symptoms, especially trembling, twitching, muscle tension, headaches, irritability, sweating, or hot flashes. They may feel lightheaded or out of breath. They may feel nauseated or have to go to the bathroom frequently. Many individuals with GAD startle more easily than other people. They tend to feel tired, have trouble concentrating, and sometimes suffer from depression, too. Unlike many other anxiety disorders, people with GAD don't characteristically avoid certain situations as a result of their disorder. However, if severe, GAD can be very debilitating, making it difficult to carry out even the most ordinary daily activities. GAD comes on gradually and most often hits people in childhood or adolescence, but can begin in adulthood, too. It's more common in women than in men and often occurs in relatives of affected persons. It's diagnosed when someone spends at least 6 months worried excessively about a number of everyday problems.
    Top of page
    Panic Disorder

    "It began two years ago. I was feeling stressed out when I went to my class. Suddenly my heart started pounding and everything around me felt distant and unreal. I felt like I couldn't stay there another instant without dying. For me, a panic attack is terrifying. It makes me feel like I'm going crazy. I'm always afraid I'm going to have another one."

    People with panic disorder have feelings of terror that strike suddenly and repeatedly with no warning. They can't predict when an attack will occur, and many develop intense anxiety between episodes, worrying when and where the next one will strike. In between times there is a persistent, lingering worry that another attack could come any minute. When a panic attack strikes, most likely your heart pounds and you may feel sweaty, weak, faint, or dizzy. Your hands may tingle or feel numb, and you might feel flushed or chilled. You may have chest pain or smothering sensations, a sense of unreality, or fear or impending doom or loss of control. You may genuinely believe you're having a heart attack or stroke, losing your mind, or on the verge of death. While most attacks average a couple of minutes, occasionally they can go on for up to 10 minutes. However, they usually are self limiting, and rarely last more than 30 minutes. Panic disorder strikes at least 1.6 percent of the population and is twice as common in women as in men. It can appear at any age, but most often it begins in young adults. Not everyone who experiences panic attacks will develop panic disorder-- for example, many people have one attack but never have another. For those who do have panic disorder, though, it's important to seek treatment. Untreated, the disorder can become very disabling. Some people's lives become greatly restricted—they avoid normal, everyday activities such as going to class, dating, or even leaving one's house. Or, they may be able to confront a feared situation only if accompanied by a close friend or other trusted person. Basically, they avoid any situation they fear would make them feel helpless if a panic attack occurs. Studies have shown that proper treatment can almost always eliminate or control Panic Disorder. Psychotherapy is often effective in both stopping panic attacks, and in illuminating and alleviating the underlying fears which often cause panic disorder. When panic attacks are frequent or debilitating, medication, usually the same types used to treat depression, can eradicate panic attacks. When panic attacks are marked primarily by physical symptoms, medication which blocks the effect of excess adrenaline on your body can be very effective. Behavior therapy and Cognitive-Behavior therapy can also be effective, especially when behavioral elements are predominant symptoms.
    Top of page
    Phobias

    Phobias occur in several forms. A specific phobia is a fear of a particular object or situation. Social phobia is a fear of being painfully embarrassed in a social setting. And agoraphobia, which often accompanies panic disorder, is a fear of being in any situation that might provoke a panic attack, or from which escape might be difficult if one occurred. Phobias aren't just extreme fear; they are irrational fear. Many people experience specific phobias, intense, irrational fears of certain things or situations—dogs, closed-in places, heights, escalators, tunnels, highway driving, water, flying, and injuries involving blood are a few of the more common ones. Adults with phobias realize their fears are irrational, but often facing, or even thinking about facing, the feared object or situation brings on a panic attack or severe anxiety.
    Top of page
    Specific Phobias

    Specific phobias strike more than 1 in 10 people. No one knows just what causes them, though they seem to run in families and are a little more prevalent in women. Phobias usually first appear in adolescence or adulthood. They start suddenly and tend to be more persistent than childhood phobias; only about 20 percent of adult phobias vanish on their own. When children have specific phobias—for example, a fear of animals—those fears usually disappear over time, though they may continue into adulthood. When phobias interfere with a person's life, treatment can help. Successful treatment usually involves a kind of cognitive-behavioral therapy called desensitization or exposure therapy, in which patients are gradually exposed to what frightens them until the fear begins to fade. Three-fourths of patients benefit significantly from this type of treatment. Relaxation and breathing exercises also help reduce anxiety symptoms. There is currently no proven drug treatment for specific phobias, but sometimes certain medications may be prescribed to help reduce anxiety symptoms before someone faces a phobic situation. Medication to control panic attacks can also be very useful in controlling this disorder. When phobias occur along with difficulties in other areas of life, such as with self-esteem, relationships, feelings of depression or anxiety, psychotherapy can be of great benefit.
    Top of page
    Social Phobias

    "I'll always remember that day when I had to give that presentation. When I got up in front of the class, my heart was pounding and my hands were sweaty. I felt that my voice was so shaky that no one would be able to understand me. All I could think about was how much of a jerk I must look like. The more I thought that, the more nervous I got. My hands were shaking like a wet dog. I haven't taken any courses where I have to present since then." Social phobia is an intense fear of becoming humiliated in social situations, specifically of embarrassing yourself in front of other people. It often runs in families and may be accompanied by depression or alcoholism. Social phobia often begins around early adolescence or even younger. If you suffer from social phobia, you tend to think that other people are very competent in public and that you are not. Small mistakes you make may seem to you much more exaggerated than they really are. Blushing itself may seem painfully embarrassing, and you feel as though all eyes are focused on you. You may be afraid of being with people other than those closest to you. Or your fear may be more specific, such as feeling anxious about giving a speech, talking to a boss or other authority figure, or dating. The most common social phobia is a fear of public speaking. Sometimes social phobia involves a general fear of social situations such as parties.

    Although this disorder is often thought of as shyness, the two are not the same. Shy people can be very uneasy around others, but they don't experience the extreme anxiety in anticipating a social situation, and they don't necessarily avoid circumstances that make them feel self-conscious. In contrast, people with social phobia aren't necessarily shy at all. They can be completely at ease with people most of the time, but particular situations, such as walking down an aisle in public or making a speech, can give them intense anxiety. Social phobia disrupts normal life, interfering with career or social relationships. People with social phobia are aware that their feelings are irrational. Still, they experience a great deal of dread before facing the feared situation, and they may go out of their way to avoid it. Even if they manage to confront what they fear, they usually feel very anxious beforehand and are intensely uncomfortable throughout. Afterwards, the unpleasant feelings may linger, as they worry about how they may have been judged or what others may have thought or observed about them. Treatment for social phobias varies with the kind of symptoms and associated difficulties an individual may experience. Often social phobias are secondary to low self-esteem, or to a difficulty in feeling that one can belong to a social group. Psychodynamic psychotherapy or group therapy can be helpful in these situations. Frequently medication which blocks the effect of adrenaline on the body can quickly eliminate the physical symptoms which often sends the individual into a vicious cycle of fear of humiliation and escalating symptoms. Behavior therapy can be useful in helping individual's gain control over their symptoms, and to help overcome avoidant behavior. Medication aimed at reducing anxiety or blocking panic attacks may also be of benefit.

    Everybody knows what it's like to feel anxious—the butterflies in your stomach before a first date, the tension you feel w hen you are about to take an exam, the way your heart pounds if you're in danger. Anxiety rouses you to action. It gears you up to face a threatening situation. It makes you study harder for that exam, and keeps you on your toes when you're making a presentation. In general, it helps you cope. But if you have an anxiety disorder, this normally helpful emotion can do just the opposite—it can keep you from coping and can disrupt your daily life. Anxiety disorders aren't just a case of "nerves." They are conditions, often caused by stressful events in and life experiences of the individual, and effected by an individual's biological make-up. There are several types of anxiety disorders, each with its own distinct features. An anxiety disorder may make you feel anxious most of the time, without any apparent reason. Or the anxious feelings may be so uncomfortable that to avoid them you may stop some everyday activities. Or you may have occasional bouts of anxiety so intense they terrify and immobilize you. Many people misunderstand these disorders and think individuals should be able to overcome the symptoms by sheer willpower.

    More information on anxiety can be found on the Mental Help Net website.
    Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    "I just can't seem to stop worrying. Sometimes I feel okay, but then the smallest thing can set me off and I can't get my mind to stop. I feel tense and jumpy and can't do anything to get my mind to relax. Often I get headaches which just makes everything feel even worse. Then if on top of everything, I can't sleep, I feel like I'm about to crack."

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is much more than the normal anxiety people experience day to day. It's chronic and exaggerated worry and tension, even though nothing seems to provoke it. Having this disorder means always anticipating disaster, often worrying excessively about health, money, family, or work. Sometimes, though, the source of the worry is hard to pinpoint. Simply the thought of getting through the day provokes anxiety. People with GAD can't seem to shake their concerns, even though they usually realize that their anxiety is more intense than the situation warrants. They often have trouble falling or staying asleep. Their worries are accompanied by physical symptoms, especially trembling, twitching, muscle tension, headaches, irritability, sweating, or hot flashes. They may feel lightheaded or out of breath. They may feel nauseated or have to go to the bathroom frequently. Many individuals with GAD startle more easily than other people. They tend to feel tired, have trouble concentrating, and sometimes suffer from depression, too. Unlike many other anxiety disorders, people with GAD don't characteristically avoid certain situations as a result of their disorder. However, if severe, GAD can be very debilitating, making it difficult to carry out even the most ordinary daily activities. GAD comes on gradually and most often hits people in childhood or adolescence, but can begin in adulthood, too. It's more common in women than in men and often occurs in relatives of affected persons. It's diagnosed when someone spends at least 6 months worried excessively about a number of everyday problems.
    Top of page
    Panic Disorder

    "It began two years ago. I was feeling stressed out when I went to my class. Suddenly my heart started pounding and everything around me felt distant and unreal. I felt like I couldn't stay there another instant without dying. For me, a panic attack is terrifying. It makes me feel like I'm going crazy. I'm always afraid I'm going to have another one."

    People with panic disorder have feelings of terror that strike suddenly and repeatedly with no warning. They can't predict when an attack will occur, and many develop intense anxiety between episodes, worrying when and where the next one will strike. In between times there is a persistent, lingering worry that another attack could come any minute. When a panic attack strikes, most likely your heart pounds and you may feel sweaty, weak, faint, or dizzy. Your hands may tingle or feel numb, and you might feel flushed or chilled. You may have chest pain or smothering sensations, a sense of unreality, or fear or impending doom or loss of control. You may genuinely believe you're having a heart attack or stroke, losing your mind, or on the verge of death. While most attacks average a couple of minutes, occasionally they can go on for up to 10 minutes. However, they usually are self limiting, and rarely last more than 30 minutes. Panic disorder strikes at least 1.6 percent of the population and is twice as common in women as in men. It can appear at any age, but most often it begins in young adults. Not everyone who experiences panic attacks will develop panic disorder-- for example, many people have one attack but never have another. For those who do have panic disorder, though, it's important to seek treatment. Untreated, the disorder can become very disabling. Some people's lives become greatly restricted—they avoid normal, everyday activities such as going to class, dating, or even leaving one's house. Or, they may be able to confront a feared situation only if accompanied by a close friend or other trusted person. Basically, they avoid any situation they fear would make them feel helpless if a panic attack occurs. Studies have shown that proper treatment can almost always eliminate or control Panic Disorder. Psychotherapy is often effective in both stopping panic attacks, and in illuminating and alleviating the underlying fears which often cause panic disorder. When panic attacks are frequent or debilitating, medication, usually the same types used to treat depression, can eradicate panic attacks. When panic attacks are marked primarily by physical symptoms, medication which blocks the effect of excess adrenaline on your body can be very effective. Behavior therapy and Cognitive-Behavior therapy can also be effective, especially when behavioral elements are predominant symptoms.
    Top of page
    Phobias

    Phobias occur in several forms. A specific phobia is a fear of a particular object or situation. Social phobia is a fear of being painfully embarrassed in a social setting. And agoraphobia, which often accompanies panic disorder, is a fear of being in any situation that might provoke a panic attack, or from which escape might be difficult if one occurred. Phobias aren't just extreme fear; they are irrational fear. Many people experience specific phobias, intense, irrational fears of certain things or situations—dogs, closed-in places, heights, escalators, tunnels, highway driving, water, flying, and injuries involving blood are a few of the more common ones. Adults with phobias realize their fears are irrational, but often facing, or even thinking about facing, the feared object or situation brings on a panic attack or severe anxiety.
    Top of page
    Specific Phobias

    Specific phobias strike more than 1 in 10 people. No one knows just what causes them, though they seem to run in families and are a little more prevalent in women. Phobias usually first appear in adolescence or adulthood. They start suddenly and tend to be more persistent than childhood phobias; only about 20 percent of adult phobias vanish on their own. When children have specific phobias—for example, a fear of animals—those fears usually disappear over time, though they may continue into adulthood. When phobias interfere with a person's life, treatment can help. Successful treatment usually involves a kind of cognitive-behavioral therapy called desensitization or exposure therapy, in which patients are gradually exposed to what frightens them until the fear begins to fade. Three-fourths of patients benefit significantly from this type of treatment. Relaxation and breathing exercises also help reduce anxiety symptoms. There is currently no proven drug treatment for specific phobias, but sometimes certain medications may be prescribed to help reduce anxiety symptoms before someone faces a phobic situation. Medication to control panic attacks can also be very useful in controlling this disorder. When phobias occur along with difficulties in other areas of life, such as with self-esteem, relationships, feelings of depression or anxiety, psychotherapy can be of great benefit.
    Top of page
    Social Phobias

    "I'll always remember that day when I had to give that presentation. When I got up in front of the class, my heart was pounding and my hands were sweaty. I felt that my voice was so shaky that no one would be able to understand me. All I could think about was how much of a jerk I must look like. The more I thought that, the more nervous I got. My hands were shaking like a wet dog. I haven't taken any courses where I have to present since then." Social phobia is an intense fear of becoming humiliated in social situations, specifically of embarrassing yourself in front of other people. It often runs in families and may be accompanied by depression or alcoholism. Social phobia often begins around early adolescence or even younger. If you suffer from social phobia, you tend to think that other people are very competent in public and that you are not. Small mistakes you make may seem to you much more exaggerated than they really are. Blushing itself may seem painfully embarrassing, and you feel as though all eyes are focused on you. You may be afraid of being with people other than those closest to you. Or your fear may be more specific, such as feeling anxious about giving a speech, talking to a boss or other authority figure, or dating. The most common social phobia is a fear of public speaking. Sometimes social phobia involves a general fear of social situations such as parties.

    Although this disorder is often thought of as shyness, the two are not the same. Shy people can be very uneasy around others, but they don't experience the extreme anxiety in anticipating a social situation, and they don't necessarily avoid circumstances that make them feel self-conscious. In contrast, people with social phobia aren't necessarily shy at all. They can be completely at ease with people most of the time, but particular situations, such as walking down an aisle in public or making a speech, can give them intense anxiety. Social phobia disrupts normal life, interfering with career or social relationships. People with social phobia are aware that their feelings are irrational. Still, they experience a great deal of dread before facing the feared situation, and they may go out of their way to avoid it. Even if they manage to confront what they fear, they usually feel very anxious beforehand and are intensely uncomfortable throughout. Afterwards, the unpleasant feelings may linger, as they worry about how they may have been judged or what others may have thought or observed about them. Treatment for social phobias varies with the kind of symptoms and associated difficulties an individual may experience. Often social phobias are secondary to low self-esteem, or to a difficulty in feeling that one can belong to a social group. Psychodynamic psychotherapy or group therapy can be helpful in these situations. Frequently medication which blocks the effect of adrenaline on the body can quickly eliminate the physical symptoms which often sends the individual into a vicious cycle of fear of humiliation and escalating symptoms. Behavior therapy can be useful in helping individual's gain control over their symptoms, and to help overcome avoidant behavior. Medication aimed at reducing anxiety or blocking panic attacks may also be of benefit.

    Attention Deficit Disorder is a treatable neurological condition commonly characterized by the presence of inattentiveness, problems in concentration, and at times hyperactivity or impulsivity. It is primarily a condition of childhood, and many of children with this disorder will outgrow some of their symptoms. It is essential to this diagnosis that an individual shows serious problems in their social and academic functioning prior to age 7. However, both the symptoms and especially the social and self-esteem difficulties which often accompany this disorder can continue to effect people through their adult lives. In both children and adults a thorough assessment is needed to establish the diagnosis. The diagnosis cannot be made on a single interview. School records and family assessment are usually necessary to make an accurate diagnosis. In most individuals, problems with attention and concentration are more likely to be related to stress, anxiety, or depression, than to A.D.D.. The diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that A.D.D. often co-exists with stress related disorders. It is crucial to make an accurate diagnosis because both A.D.D. and other disorders which may mimic it are highly treatable.

    The treatment for A.D.D. often includes stimulant medication such as Ritalin. As most people who try Ritalin will experience some initial increase in concentration, a response to Ritalin in itself does not establish the diagnosis. In fact, due to its stimulant activity, and the currant interest in A.D.D., Ritalin has become one of the most abused drugs on university campuses. Drug therapy, while effective and often necessary, is not the only treatment available for A.D.D.. Behavioral treatments, support groups, and individual therapy can all be crucial aspects of treatment.

    Everyone has moods. Moods are a normal part of everyday life. Daily life events, sleep, weather, physiological cycles, etc. can all alter one's moods. Mood disorders are distinct from normal moods in their depth and persistence, and in their interference in one's ability to function.

    More information on depression can be found on the Mental Help Net website.
    Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood

    "I felt shattered when she broke up with me. I knew that things weren't going that well lately, but I felt like I was punched in the gut when she told me she had met someone else whom she was interested in. Since then I've felt really awful. I'm okay when I'm with friends, but when I'm alone, or when something reminds me of her, I feel really down. I've even thought of suicide at times. I haven't been able to concentrate well over the past while. I've been feeling quite worn out as well. Often I just can't seem to fall asleep. I just lie awake thinking about how alone I am."

    One thing you can be sure of in life, is that at some point you will have an adjustment disorder with depressed mood. The symptoms may be relatively mild, and may go away simply with support from family and friends. At times the symptoms may be quite severe and professional help may be necessary. Usually the symptoms gradually get better with time. Overwhelming feelings of hopelessness and despair one week, may diminish to tolerable sadness the next week.

    When treatment is necessary, counseling or short-term psychotherapy will usually quickly resolve the symptoms and unhappy feelings. When sleep is considerably disturbed, attention to normal sleep hygiene, or at times mild medication, will often leave a person better able to cope with the events causing their distress.
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    Dysthymic Disorder

    "I've been feeling down for so long it feels like forever. I've been depressed for at least the past 3 years. It's gotten better and worse during that time. At times I feel just dreadful and hopeless. Other times I just feel low. Occasionally I feel okay. Most of the time I feel unhappy with everything in life. I'm doing okay in my courses, but I can't say I'm really enjoying them. Often I feel like I'm running on empty. I think I feel alone a lot of the time. I feel that no one really likes me. But then, I don't blame them. I wouldn't like me either."

    Dysthymic disorder, or chronic depression, often starts in adolescence or young adulthood, and may continue for many years if untreated. The diagnosis is made when one has been feeling some level of depression almost continuously for at least 2 years. Common symptoms are low energy, decreased concentration or attention, loss of interest or motivation in activities, irritability, insomnia, and pronounced pessimism. Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide may occur, although people with dysthymia will usually not make serious suicide attempts. This condition is usually a result of unhappy or traumatic life events. It usually takes many years of repeated disappointments in life for one to develop dysthymia, and likewise may take several years of therapy for one to start to change the way they feel about themselves and about life. Certain people may be more prone to develop dysthymia than others under similar circumstances. This disorder usually begins early in adult life.

    Treatment usually involves therapy aimed at helping the individual become more adaptive in his daily life, as well as uncovering the roots of the negative self perceptions which are often at the core of this disorder. Anti-depressant medication may provide some relief in about one third of people with dysthymia.
    Top of page
    Major Depression

    "I've been feeling so low for weeks that I just can't seem to do anything...It's hard for me to get out of bed even though I wake up early every morning...I just lie there feeling everything is pointless...I don't feel like eating... I can't concentrate on anything...I just want this to end...I don't care how."

    The essential feature of this disorder is a persistent depressed mood which has been present for at least 2 weeks, with loss of interest or pleasure in almost all activities. Other symptoms include severe appetite disturbance, sleep disturbance, low energy, agitation, feelings of worthlessness or guilt, difficulty concentrating, and frequent thoughts of suicide or death. These symptoms are common in any kind of depression, and are also frequent in any kind of stressful situation. What distinguishes a Major Depression from other mood or stress related problems is the severity and the persistence of the symptoms. A person with a Major Depression will not feel much better under any circumstances, regardless of the amount of support one receives. Without proper treatment the depression may last for months or years. Some people may have only one episode of this type of depression in their lifetime. Other people may be prone to getting depressed repeatedly. It usually takes an extended evaluation for this diagnosis to be made. A person who appears extremely depressed at one point in time may seem quite different a week later or under different circumstances. An accurate diagnosis is important in order to arrive at the best treatment plan.

    These days there is a strong tendency in medicine for practitioners to make quick assessments and to hand out medication simply on the basis of the most predominant symptom a patient may have. There is no research which supports this practice model, either as being best for an individual or more cost-efficient. This model has evolved largely because of pharmaceutical marketing, managed care policies, and a shortage of properly trained practitioners. The diagnosis of Major Depression does not in itself indicate that a person has a "chemical imbalance", or that the person needs medication in order to get better. Research has consistently shown that 30% of people with this diagnosis will get better with placebos alone. Therapy will be effective in 65-75% of people with Major Depression, even under research conditions which may not be conducive to helping one form a good therapeutic relationship. Medication will help 70- 80% of people with a Major Depression, having its greatest effect on physiological symptoms. The proper therapy for any individual should be determined based on an understanding of that person's symptoms and situation, and on the individual's responsiveness to various modalities.
    Top of page
    Manic-Depressive Disorder

    "Sometimes I feel like I have all the energy in the world or even the universe so I can do anything even if I never sleep 'cause I don't need to sleep when I have so much power to do whatever I want to, and no one can stop me anyway even though of course they're envious of me but who wouldn't be. I feel like I could fly sometimes and maybe I could and I felt that way last night when I went running in the middle of the night because who wants to sleep when I can do anything and its so great running at 3 A.M. even if it was minus 20 but I never feel the cold because of my special powers I can will myself to feel or do whatever I want."

    Manic-Depressive Illness, known also as bipolar disorder, is the most distinct and dramatic of the affective disorders. It usually first occurs during young adulthood, and almost always appears before age 35. Nearly one in 100 people will suffer from this disorder at some time in their lives. The distinction between bipolar illness and other depressive disorders is that patients usually experience both periods of abnormally euphoric moods and severe depression. Manic-depression is not severe moodiness. People whose moods change between feeling good or somewhat euphoric to feeling down, distressed or suicidal within hours to a day or two, do not have manic-depressive illness. People with these kind of mood changes are usually individuals who are extremely sensitive to feelings of rejection or abandonment. In Manic-depressive illness the unnatural moods last days to months. Patients will often have periods of normal mood in between the manic and depressive phases. In the manic phase people will experience an excessively euphoric mood, usually will show very poor judgment about their abilities, and will often appear speedy or hyperactive. Their thoughts may be hard to follow, though often the individual themselves may interpret this as evidence of their creativity or genius. Their sleep is almost always disturbed, often with the person showing no need for sleep.

    There is a strong genetic predisposition for this illness. Close relatives of people suffering from bipolar illness are 10 to 20 times more likely to develop either depression or manic- depressive illness than the general population. Many other physical and mental disorders can mimic manic-depressive illnesses. Certain drugs can induce symptoms similar to those of mania.

    Though manic- depressive disorder can become disabling, it is also among the most treatable of mental illnesses. The combination of medication and psychotherapy returns the vast majority of patients to happy, functioning lives. The most common medication, lithium carbonate, successfully reduces the frequency and intensity of manic episodes for most patients. It also is helpful in controlling the depressive episodes. However lithium has to be taken on a regular basis, and blood levels need to be well controlled to ensure its efficacy and limit side effects. Among frequent side effects are thirst, weight gain, hand tremors, and stomach irritation. When properly monitored, lithium has returned thousands of people to normal, happy lives which they otherwise would not have had. Psychotherapy can also be of value in helping the individual to understand the stresses of both the illness and everyday life, to live with their emotions, and to learn how to avoid relapses. Families of manic-depressive patients may also benefit from professional care to help understand the impact of this illness.

    Everyone has moods. Moods are a normal part of everyday life. Daily life events, sleep, weather, physiological cycles, etc. can all alter one's moods. Mood disorders are distinct from normal moods in their depth and persistence, and in their interference in one's ability to function.

    More information on depression can be found on the Mental Help Net website.
    Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood

    "I felt shattered when she broke up with me. I knew that things weren't going that well lately, but I felt like I was punched in the gut when she told me she had met someone else whom she was interested in. Since then I've felt really awful. I'm okay when I'm with friends, but when I'm alone, or when something reminds me of her, I feel really down. I've even thought of suicide at times. I haven't been able to concentrate well over the past while. I've been feeling quite worn out as well. Often I just can't seem to fall asleep. I just lie awake thinking about how alone I am."

    One thing you can be sure of in life, is that at some point you will have an adjustment disorder with depressed mood. The symptoms may be relatively mild, and may go away simply with support from family and friends. At times the symptoms may be quite severe and professional help may be necessary. Usually the symptoms gradually get better with time. Overwhelming feelings of hopelessness and despair one week, may diminish to tolerable sadness the next week.

    When treatment is necessary, counseling or short-term psychotherapy will usually quickly resolve the symptoms and unhappy feelings. When sleep is considerably disturbed, attention to normal sleep hygiene, or at times mild medication, will often leave a person better able to cope with the events causing their distress.
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    Dysthymic Disorder

    "I've been feeling down for so long it feels like forever. I've been depressed for at least the past 3 years. It's gotten better and worse during that time. At times I feel just dreadful and hopeless. Other times I just feel low. Occasionally I feel okay. Most of the time I feel unhappy with everything in life. I'm doing okay in my courses, but I can't say I'm really enjoying them. Often I feel like I'm running on empty. I think I feel alone a lot of the time. I feel that no one really likes me. But then, I don't blame them. I wouldn't like me either."

    Dysthymic disorder, or chronic depression, often starts in adolescence or young adulthood, and may continue for many years if untreated. The diagnosis is made when one has been feeling some level of depression almost continuously for at least 2 years. Common symptoms are low energy, decreased concentration or attention, loss of interest or motivation in activities, irritability, insomnia, and pronounced pessimism. Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide may occur, although people with dysthymia will usually not make serious suicide attempts. This condition is usually a result of unhappy or traumatic life events. It usually takes many years of repeated disappointments in life for one to develop dysthymia, and likewise may take several years of therapy for one to start to change the way they feel about themselves and about life. Certain people may be more prone to develop dysthymia than others under similar circumstances. This disorder usually begins early in adult life.

    Treatment usually involves therapy aimed at helping the individual become more adaptive in his daily life, as well as uncovering the roots of the negative self perceptions which are often at the core of this disorder. Anti-depressant medication may provide some relief in about one third of people with dysthymia.
    Top of page
    Major Depression

    "I've been feeling so low for weeks that I just can't seem to do anything...It's hard for me to get out of bed even though I wake up early every morning...I just lie there feeling everything is pointless...I don't feel like eating... I can't concentrate on anything...I just want this to end...I don't care how."

    The essential feature of this disorder is a persistent depressed mood which has been present for at least 2 weeks, with loss of interest or pleasure in almost all activities. Other symptoms include severe appetite disturbance, sleep disturbance, low energy, agitation, feelings of worthlessness or guilt, difficulty concentrating, and frequent thoughts of suicide or death. These symptoms are common in any kind of depression, and are also frequent in any kind of stressful situation. What distinguishes a Major Depression from other mood or stress related problems is the severity and the persistence of the symptoms. A person with a Major Depression will not feel much better under any circumstances, regardless of the amount of support one receives. Without proper treatment the depression may last for months or years. Some people may have only one episode of this type of depression in their lifetime. Other people may be prone to getting depressed repeatedly. It usually takes an extended evaluation for this diagnosis to be made. A person who appears extremely depressed at one point in time may seem quite different a week later or under different circumstances. An accurate diagnosis is important in order to arrive at the best treatment plan.

    These days there is a strong tendency in medicine for practitioners to make quick assessments and to hand out medication simply on the basis of the most predominant symptom a patient may have. There is no research which supports this practice model, either as being best for an individual or more cost-efficient. This model has evolved largely because of pharmaceutical marketing, managed care policies, and a shortage of properly trained practitioners. The diagnosis of Major Depression does not in itself indicate that a person has a "chemical imbalance", or that the person needs medication in order to get better. Research has consistently shown that 30% of people with this diagnosis will get better with placebos alone. Therapy will be effective in 65-75% of people with Major Depression, even under research conditions which may not be conducive to helping one form a good therapeutic relationship. Medication will help 70- 80% of people with a Major Depression, having its greatest effect on physiological symptoms. The proper therapy for any individual should be determined based on an understanding of that person's symptoms and situation, and on the individual's responsiveness to various modalities.
    Top of page
    Manic-Depressive Disorder

    "Sometimes I feel like I have all the energy in the world or even the universe so I can do anything even if I never sleep 'cause I don't need to sleep when I have so much power to do whatever I want to, and no one can stop me anyway even though of course they're envious of me but who wouldn't be. I feel like I could fly sometimes and maybe I could and I felt that way last night when I went running in the middle of the night because who wants to sleep when I can do anything and its so great running at 3 A.M. even if it was minus 20 but I never feel the cold because of my special powers I can will myself to feel or do whatever I want."

    Manic-Depressive Illness, known also as bipolar disorder, is the most distinct and dramatic of the affective disorders. It usually first occurs during young adulthood, and almost always appears before age 35. Nearly one in 100 people will suffer from this disorder at some time in their lives. The distinction between bipolar illness and other depressive disorders is that patients usually experience both periods of abnormally euphoric moods and severe depression. Manic-depression is not severe moodiness. People whose moods change between feeling good or somewhat euphoric to feeling down, distressed or suicidal within hours to a day or two, do not have manic-depressive illness. People with these kind of mood changes are usually individuals who are extremely sensitive to feelings of rejection or abandonment. In Manic-depressive illness the unnatural moods last days to months. Patients will often have periods of normal mood in between the manic and depressive phases. In the manic phase people will experience an excessively euphoric mood, usually will show very poor judgment about their abilities, and will often appear speedy or hyperactive. Their thoughts may be hard to follow, though often the individual themselves may interpret this as evidence of their creativity or genius. Their sleep is almost always disturbed, often with the person showing no need for sleep.

    There is a strong genetic predisposition for this illness. Close relatives of people suffering from bipolar illness are 10 to 20 times more likely to develop either depression or manic- depressive illness than the general population. Many other physical and mental disorders can mimic manic-depressive illnesses. Certain drugs can induce symptoms similar to those of mania.

    Though manic- depressive disorder can become disabling, it is also among the most treatable of mental illnesses. The combination of medication and psychotherapy returns the vast majority of patients to happy, functioning lives. The most common medication, lithium carbonate, successfully reduces the frequency and intensity of manic episodes for most patients. It also is helpful in controlling the depressive episodes. However lithium has to be taken on a regular basis, and blood levels need to be well controlled to ensure its efficacy and limit side effects. Among frequent side effects are thirst, weight gain, hand tremors, and stomach irritation. When properly monitored, lithium has returned thousands of people to normal, happy lives which they otherwise would not have had. Psychotherapy can also be of value in helping the individual to understand the stresses of both the illness and everyday life, to live with their emotions, and to learn how to avoid relapses. Families of manic-depressive patients may also benefit from professional care to help understand the impact of this illness.

    "I started feeling I was fat when I was 15. My friends were all trying to lose weight, and I started dieting just like them. But it seemed that no matter how much weight I lost, I was still too fat. At first I just kept to a 500 calorie diet, but when my weight dropped below 100 lbs., my parents started bugging me to eat more. I then found it was easier to just eat what they wanted me to and then throw it up. When I went off to university, I still didn't like how I looked. I never felt that I was good enough at anything, no matter how I did. I often felt so alone, but I didn't want to tell anyone how I felt. I didn't feel that anyone would really understand anyway. I began bingeing four, five times a day. I often felt I couldn't concentrate until after I had binged. But then I'd feel so badly for bingeing that I couldn't do anything anyway."

    There is a general belief in our society that thinner is better, especially for women. This belief tends to be emphasized by media portrayals of women. For people with eating disorders, this belief becomes an obsession. Often struggling with their self-esteem and sense of control in the world, individuals with eating disorders focus on their body image and their control over their bodies as the indicator of their success. Eating disorders affect people of all ages, classes, ethnic backgrounds and occupations. However it is most common in young women. Up to 25% of adolescent girls will show some eating disorder behavior. Around 5% of women between the ages of 14 and 25 will have anorexia or bulimia. These disorders are extremely serious. In addition to the low self-esteem, the feelings of depression, and the difficult in social functioning associated with these disorders, there are many physical dangers resulting from these illnesses. Severe weight loss can lead to weakened muscle and bone tissue, hormonal imbalances and cardiac problems. In severe anorexia, permanent stunting of growth and osteoporosis are common. In bulimia, vomiting can cause bleeding of the G.I. tract and cardiac arrhythmia's. The mortality rate for these disorders as around 6%, rising to 20% in severe anorexics and bulimic.

    While many people with mild eating disorders will overcome the problem on their own, counseling or therapy can be crucial in helping many people resolve both their unhealthy eating behavior and their underlying psychological difficulties. Psycho-educational programs and support groups can be very helpful in helping one learn about good nutrition and understand the issues involved in dealing with eating disorders. Nutritional and health assesments are also a crucial part of treatment. Frequent dental check-ups are very important in bulemics who purge, as erosion of tooth enamal is highly associated with purging. Individuals with more severe eating disorders, ( weight loss of more than 20% of normal body weight or daily bingeing behavior ), will invariably require individual therapy as well. In the most severe cases, hospital treatment may be necessary. In severe bulimia, medication may be of value in helping one control the need to binge and purge.

    What is a 'chemical imbalance'?

    The term "chemical imbalance" is thrown around a lot these days. True conditions caused by chemical imbalances are relatively rare. All thoughts, feelings and motions in the brain are mediated by the release of chemicals in brain pathways. Every person's brain is unique, leading each of us to have different traits and abilities. Just because your brain works in a particular way does not mean that you have a chemical imbalance. A certain amount of sadness, anxiety or other emotional upset is normal, and though we may be able to block these feelings by chemicals, this would tend to dehumanize us. Even when we use medication to help an individual with overwhelming emotions, most of the time this is not to repair a "chemical imbalance" but simply to help contain symptoms. The newer anti-depressants, known mostly as SSRIs, can have a mood-dampening effect, in that they seem to contain intense emotions in many individuals. The usefulness of this aspect has to be considered in light of a person's whole life.
    Top of page
    Anti-depressant medication: Current state of knowledge

    Over the past ten years there has been an explosion in the development and use of new anti-depressant drugs. Last year SSRIs were prescribed to 20% of the adult population in Canada. These medications are being marketed for an ever increasing list of indications. However, the efficacy of these drugs as the primary treatment for many of these disorders is still questionable. This is especially true in the use of anti-depressant medication in adolescents and young adults, where research has shown overall poor responses to this class of drugs. The following points are of crucial importance in evaluating the use of medication in the student population.

    Research on brain development has indicated that in the post-natal to adolescent period, an overabundance of receptor sites is produced in many brain pathways. These sites are pruned during the late adolescent and early adult period. This implies that artificially increasing neurotransmitter levels during this period could potentially lead to an overpruning of receptor sites. It is therefore possible that prescribing anti-depressant medication to people aged 18-24 could make them prone to depressions throughout their adult life. With our present state of knowledge, we have no assurance that the use of psychotropic medication in young people does not have adverse long-term effects.

    SSRIs do not just affect serotonin pathways. Most of these drugs affect noradrenaline and dopamine pathways, especially at higher doses. Research on depression in adolescents has consistently shown that anti-depressant medication has no advantage over placebo. There has been no research done specifically on a young adult population. Clinical experience indicates that these populations are similar. Research on treatment of depression by medication in adult populations has consistently shown that medications seem effective primarily in Major Depression with Melancholia. Other depressive syndromes show only marginal responses to medication when compared to placebos. Major Depression with Melancholia is a rare diagnosis in young adults. Most depressions in young adults show a labile mood pattern. However, this may not be evident in an initial interview. Side effects experienced by a student population tend to be more pronounced than described in the literature. This is probably due to increased expectations and the active lifestyle of students.
    Recommendations

    The use of anti-depressant medication in the student population needs to be very carefully considered. While these medications may be valuable in certain conditions, the possible ramifications of treatment, both physiological and psychological, can be profound. Anti-depressant medication should rarely be prescribed on a first visit. It is impossible to make an accurate assessment of consistent symptoms in students without at least two in-depth interviews. Medication should not be considered to be a primary treatment modality in students. Most students respond well to therapy without the need for medication.

    Indications for anti-depressant medication:

    1. Major Depression with Melancholia
    2. Severe Panic Attacks ( > 2 daily)
    3. Severe Bulimia ( > 4 purges daily)
    4. Severe Anxiety

    Top of page
    Other medications

    There are many medications used in psychiatry that are useful for various symptoms. Most of these are best for short-term use as an adjunct to therapy. Some more severe conditions may require long-term use of medication, but these conditions need to be properly diagnosed by an expert.

    "I couldn't do anything without rituals. They transcended every aspect of my life. Counting was big for me. When I set my alarm at night, I had to set it to a number that wouldn't add up to a "bad" number. If my sister was 33 and I was 24, I couldn't leave the TV on Channel 33 or 24. I would wash my hair three times as opposed to once because three was a good luck number and one wasn't. It took me longer to read because I'd count the lines in a paragraph. If I was writing a term paper, I couldn't have a certain number of words on a line if it added up to a bad number. I was always worried that if I didn't do something, my parents were going to die. Or I would worry about harming my parents, which was completely irrational. I couldn't wear anything that said Boston because my parents were from Boston. I couldn't write the word death" because I was worried that something bad would happen."

    The disturbing thoughts or images are called obsessions, and the rituals performed to try to prevent or dispel them are called compulsions. There is no pleasure in carrying out the rituals you are drawn to, only temporary relief from the discomfort caused by the obsession. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by anxious thoughts or rituals you feel you can't control. If you have OCD, as it's called, you may be plagued by persistent, unwelcome thoughts or images, or by the urgent need to engage in certain rituals. You may be obsessed with germs or dirt, so you wash your hands over and over. You may be filled with doubt and feel the need to check things repeatedly. You might be preoccupied by thoughts of violence and fear that you will harm people close to you. You may spend long periods of time touching things or counting; you may be preoccupied by order or symmetry; you may have persistent thoughts of performing sexual acts that are repugnant to you; or you may be troubled by thoughts that are against your religious beliefs. A lot of healthy people can identify with having some of the symptoms of OCD, such as checking the stove several times before leaving the house. But the disorder is diagnosed only when such activities consume at least an hour a day, are very distressing, and interfere with daily life. Most adults with this condition recognize that what they're doing is senseless, but they can't stop it. Some people, though, particularly children with OCD, may not realize that their behavior is out of the ordinary. OCD strikes men and women in approximately equal numbers and afflicts roughly 1 in 50 people. It can appear in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood, but on the average it first shows up in the teens or early adulthood. A third of adults with OCD experienced their first symptoms as children. The course of the disease is variable—symptoms may come and go, they may ease over time, or they can grow progressively worse. Evidence suggests that OCD might run in families. Depression or other anxiety disorders may accompany OCD. And some people with OCD have eating disorders. In addition, they may avoid situations in which they might have to confront their obsessions. Or they may try unsuccessfully to use alcohol or drugs to calm themselves. If OCD grows severe enough, it can keep someone from holding down a job or from carrying out normal responsibilities at home, but more often it doesn't develop to those extremes. This diagnosis is usually restricted to people who spend at least one hour per day involved in their obsessions and rituals.

    Treatment for OCD depends on the severity of the symptoms. Medication, such as Anafranil, Paxil, or Prozac is usually necessary for treating this disorder. Behavior therapy can also be very useful in helping control the symptoms.
    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    "I was raped when I was 18 years old. For the first few days afterward I was a mess. I was crying a lot and couldn't sleep. Then I went through a period of about a month when I felt kind of numb. I thought I was doing okay but I guess I wasn't. It wasn't until I went to a frat party that I realized something was wrong. Seeing those guys trying to pick up women gave me the creeps. When some guy came onto me I suddenly felt terrified. That night I had horrible nightmares. I started having flashbacks. I would be terrified. Every instant was startling. Yet at the same time everything felt unreal. After a flashback I'd be finished for the rest of the day. I started having nightmares. I didn't feel safe anywhere, not in my bed, not at home, not even with close friends."

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that follows a terrifying event. Often, people with PTSD have persistent frightening thoughts and memories of their ordeal and feel emotionally numb, especially with people they were once close to. PTSD, once referred to as shell shock or battle fatigue, was first brought to public attention by war veterans, but it can result from any number of traumatic incidents. The event that triggers it may be something that threatened the person's life or the life of someone close to him or her. Whatever the source of the problem, some people with PTSD repeatedly relive the trauma in the form of nightmares and disturbing recollections during the day. They may also experience sleep problems, depression, feeling detached or numb, or being easily startled. They may lose interest in things they used to enjoy and have trouble feeling affectionate. Seeing things that remind them of the incident may be very distressing, which could lead them to avoid certain places or situations that bring back those memories. Anniversaries of the event are often very difficult. PTSD can occur at any age, including childhood. The disorder can be accompanied by depression, substance abuse, or anxiety. In severe cases they may have trouble working or socializing. PTSD is more common in people with previous history of anxiety or depression. People who tend to feel less secure in life to begin with are more likely to get PTSD after exposure to a traumatic event. In those who do have PTSD, symptoms usually begin within 3 months of the trauma, and the course of the illness varies. Some people recover within 6 months, others have symptoms that last much longer. In some cases, the condition may be chronic. Occasionally, the illness doesn't show up until years after the traumatic event. Antidepressants and anxiety-reducing medications can ease the symptoms of depression and anxiety. Sleep problems and nightmares can also be controlled with medication. Focused therapy, helping the person deal with the trauma itself, may be helpful. When the individual has had a previous history of problems adjusting to life, psychodynamic therapy will provide the greatest benefit.

    Sleep disturbances are extremely common in university students. Most sleep problems in students are due to immediate stresses, lifestyle issues, or environmental disturbances. Being anxious about an exam, working late on a paper, or generally being distressed often leads to a poor night's sleep. Irregular bedtime hours can often result in difficulty in falling asleep. A noisy or uncomfortable environment is likely to adversely affect sleep as well. Coffee, alcohol and stimulant drugs are common negative influences on students' sleep.

    One of the most important elements in ensuring adequate sleep is to know your own body. Just because your friend can function on six hours' sleep or can pull an all-nighter and then do well on an exam doesn't mean that you can. There is no point in spending hours studying for an exam if your mind blurs out from fatigue during the exam.

    Following good sleep hygiene will help ensure a good sleep.

    * Go to sleep at a regular hour most nights.
    * Make sure that your sleep environment is comfortable.
    * Avoid caffeine, alcohol, or stimulants after 3 pm.
    * Do some physical activity during the day, but not right before bedtime.
    * Eat regular meals.
    * Have a small snack before bed. Milk and cookies is a good choice.
    * Try not to nap during the day.
    * Relax for an hour before going to bed.

    Yeah, right! Get real! Okay, so it's totally unrealistic to routinely follow all of these points. However, one can try to make sleep habits as regular as possible, and to get back to some sort of routine after weekends and exam periods. After a late night partying, try to get up at a reasonable time (before noon!), don't nap during the day, try to get some exercise, and eat well. If you're in the middle of exam period and you've been staying up late, you can take a short nap if you need to after an exam, but try to get some exercise when you get up, and at least have some regular meals. Try to re-establish a reasonable bedtime as soon as possible.

    Sleep
    Sleepnet

    Winter blues
    Seasonal Affective Disorder

    General information
    Internet Mental Health

    Sleep disturbances are extremely common in university students. Most sleep problems in students are due to immediate stresses, lifestyle issues, or environmental disturbances. Being anxious about an exam, working late on a paper, or generally being distressed often leads to a poor night's sleep. Irregular bedtime hours can often result in difficulty in falling asleep. A noisy or uncomfortable environment is likely to adversely affect sleep as well. Coffee, alcohol and stimulant drugs are common negative influences on students' sleep.

    One of the most important elements in ensuring adequate sleep is to know your own body. Just because your friend can function on six hours' sleep or can pull an all-nighter and then do well on an exam doesn't mean that you can. There is no point in spending hours studying for an exam if your mind blurs out from fatigue during the exam.

    Follo

  • Cm
      1st of Oct, 2009
    -1 Votes

    Pass-Guaranteed.com did not honour their refund policy on the Linux exam questions I purchased!

    On September 3th, 2009 I purchased the Linux exam questions for 117-102. I studied for 7 days using their testing engine. On September 10th, 2009 I went to do the exam and I failed. The test engine is not even closed of what the questions are. So, I decided to claim my refund according with their pass-guaranteed.com refund policy. After awaiting for about 1 week I got a respond from pass-guaranteed asking me for the information I was provided on one of my emails before. I got respond from them because I submit a claim through PAYPAL, otherwise you wont get a respond. So, I submitted again my transcript, and I have not received an Email about nothing, I even escalate the claim to PAYPAL, but PAYPAL don't care. Also, I published the transcript online so they can see or downloaded, I tough maybe they didn't get my email or they didn't get the PAYPAL emails and still not respond from them. Here is the copy of the RESOLUTION CENTER of PAYPAL about the Claim.

    9/30/2009 00:22 EDT - PayPal: Buyer escalated this dispute to a Claim.
    9/30/2009 00:22 EDT - Buyer: Seller indicates on their website a (http://www.pass-guaranteed.com/guarantee.htm) a full refund. I have tried their product and I'm not satisfied. I'm claim my money back. I have provided the seller with all information they need, and I have not received any respond back.All information you need is on the dispute claim I opened early this month.
    9/25/2009 18:11 EDT - Buyer: Since I haven't heard form you. I have create an online link so you can see the file or transcript, here is the link: https://docs.google.com/fileview?id=0 (link not provide for security reasons). Please let me know the status of my refund
    9/24/2009 12:10 EDT - Buyer: Yes, I have. On Sept. 20, I sent you an email with a copy of the scores (pdf file). Also, I copy the text of the email in one of the replies on this dispute (look for 9/20/2009 17:54 EDT). Everytning that you ask for is in there. If you want, I can upload the document online, so you can see the transcript and I sent you a link, if you claim that you haven't received (and you can downloaded from there).
    9/24/2009 00:02 EDT - Seller: HI Camilo, Have you sent in your scanned transcript to techsupport@pass-guaranteed.com. Please also make sure you include the receipt id and transaction id for the purchase.

    BE AWARE!!! DONT PURCHASE - SCAM - RIPOFF
    if you want more prove send me an email at cmilo327@gmail.com.

  • Su
      23rd of Feb, 2012
    0 Votes

    Thanks, I wont waste my money with that company! So here is at least one person that lost faith and decided not to purchase from pass-guaranteed.com...

  • Jo
      17th of Dec, 2012
    0 Votes

    I totally agree with this person. I experienced the same exact thing with these ###. they say they have a money back guarnatee policy if you fail an exam, but they don't honor it. and all they say is that you must be a competitor and thats why they don't refund your money. from all the complanits and unhappy customers I am seeing online about thses guys, its time to file a suit against them and put them out of business.

  • Js
      15th of Apr, 2013
    0 Votes

    Yes i am totally agreed that Pass-Guaranteed.com is a fake site. I purchased the study material for CAPM (Paypal ID : 4029357733 ) which was entirely outdated and hence in am unable to pass the exam And when i request for refund they never response to my request. As even mentioned on their contact us page that they will get back to you with in 24 hrs that are false too. I have sent so many mails to "techsupport@pass-guaranteed.com" but not getting any response. I have even raised the ticket from their website "Ticket #: 1255096" but still not getting even single reply from them. Friends please beware... Don’t buy anything from this site. Here also i have told this to all my friends that this site is fake they are just making money with false Guarantee nothing else.

  • Ru
      13th of May, 2013
    0 Votes

    Hi, I have purchased "1Z0-465 - Oracle RightNow CX Cloud Service 2012 Essentials" on 13th May 2013 however when I tried downloading I was unable to download and after that it is giving me an error message stating that "We are sorry, but you have reached the download limit (10) for this guide." However I was unable to download even once. I would request if you look into this matter as soon as possible.

    Receipt No: 2805-0081-4260-4376
    Certificate: "1Z0-465 - Oracle RightNow CX Cloud Service 2012 Essentials"
    Damage: 69 $

    Request if you can provide me the material in that case refund the money.
    I have also raised there Service Request : 1350555, 1350616

    Regards
    R Vakharia

  • Tl
      29th of Jul, 2013
    0 Votes

    ### site. I bought the exam for 1Z0-533 and found out that most of the answers was false.
    I tried telling them some time ago, but they just said they were reporting it to their "authors", etc etc.
    Seems like they just copy the answers from other companies and just type in the answers randomly.

    Just another scam site.

    T.L.

  • Si
      1st of Oct, 2013
    0 Votes

    I have used PG and I will always use them. They clearly state on the site that competitors are posting fake comments on boards and I have to agree. They expose many other sites like pass4sure.com and testking.com where you pay out your ### for a product that is exactly the same. I find PG gets the updates much quicker and have better customer service.

    Every time I have emailed them they get back to me which proves these comments are just competitors like they have stated. What I also find interesting is searching for pass4sure scam or testking scam I yield the same results of people having issues with these site. In my personal opinion, PG is the best vendor out there and good for them exposing other sites in which you get the same product. In defence of PG with these fake user comments, all you have to do is contact them and see how fast they get back to you. Email other sites and look at their response times. I find PG to be superior of all other sites. Just my opinion, I will continue to use PG for my studies.

  • Le
      26th of Oct, 2013
    0 Votes

    AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!!
    absultely SCAM!! AVOID THIS SITE... i had the same issue Runal mentioned above... bought cpa exam (price looked cheap, so i took a chance)...This website is a scam, because of all of these:
    1) the purchased confirmation email does not even contain an order ID or any identifier code at all; that was the first sign something funny was going on.. if, like me, you need some post-sale support they always ask you the email address...how efficent is that
    2) i tried to download the links (to the .pdf and .exe) and didnt work...below the links they mention: "if you have trouble downloading try to UPgrade your browser version (here's the joke) to Firefox 3.0 (!!!) or InternetExplorer 7 (!!!) hahahaa... I DOWNgraded to those browser versions, obviously the links didnt work either
    3) asked the live chat person, she checked the order, and her explanation was that the links were being updated at that very moment (what a perfect timing i have!) and suggested to try download later..
    4) I download later and this time i get immediately ar error message "We are sorry, but you have reached the download limit (10) for this guide."
    5) contected again the socalled support team.. now they say they're not sure i actually made a paypal payment.. but i gave them the paypal transaction id, which of course i see in my paypal transactions list.. Now they want to talk to me on the phone because of this saying "you didnt include a phone num in your order.." (i'm pretty sure there was no 'phone' field in the order form)
    6) try to answer them again, now my email tothem seems to have been deviated from their side and so i cannot reach them...
    AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!! AVOID PASS-GUARANTEED !!! SCAM SITE !!!

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