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JobFox.com Resume Critiques

Posted:    

Generic Computer Generated Critiques

Complaint Rating:  98 % with 122 votes
98% 122
4.9
Contact information:
JobFox.com
United States
jobfox.com
JobFox.com provides generic critiques generated by a computer. I had the opportunity to have a critique shared with me by two of my clients. It was apparent to me that it was a form letter and computer generated, because it had the following problems:

1. Wrong job title used throughout the document in both instances.
2. Provided no real advice on how to fix the "mundane" and "flat" resumes.
3. Called the clients' experience "pudding in a cup." Yes, pudding in a cup.
4. Pulled out half of two bullet points and stated that those bullet points didn't have accomplishments in them.
5. Said that one of the clients had an objective and a career summary. The resume had niether. I would never include an objective on any resume.
6. Indicates that only entry-level candidates have an objective. Well, there is no objective and the client is an entry-level candidate.
7. Makes a point that the resumes change case and emphasis. Untrue.
8. Said the resumes do not contain keywords, when the software clearly pulls out keywords to create the "critique."
9. It's insulting to the reader and tries to convince the person that they need to spend about $400 to fix his/her resume.

Real resume writing companies, with true experts, will be comfortable showing you examples of what they can do. This company does not.

JobFox.com fails on all accounts on this one. In case you are interested I have included the information in this complaint. Below is one of the critques for a client that had two months of experience and a certification:
____________________
I'm the Jobfox resume expert that was assigned to critique your resume. I reviewed your resume with the goal of giving you an honest, straightforward assessment of your current resume, and not a judgment of your skills and qualifications. I should warn you about my style: I'm direct and to the point, so I hope you won't be offended by my comments. My perspective is that resumes get chosen, not candidates. In a perfect world, interview candidates would be selected based on their strengths and experiences. In reality, this isn't how the process works. A recruiter chooses the short list of candidates from a pile of resumes. Meaning, we have to make sure your resume does the heavy lifting in the selection process.

Here’s the good news: my first impression of you is that you are off to a good start in your career. You’re an up and coming contract management support professional, with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news: your resume isn’t doing a good job saying that to an employer. I found it to be mundane and unlikely to catch an employer’s attention. If you were selling yourself as Crème Brulee, it’s as if your resume is saying “pudding in a cup”.

Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and organizational standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting and it didn’t make me want to run to the phone to call you. These days, employers are being flooded with resumes, and we need yours to compel a hiring manager to continue reading and contact you for an interview. Countless studies have proven that resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is selected to be interviewed.

Amanda, to be honest with you, I think you should view this version of your resume as a work in progress. It's missing many key elements that we like to see on resumes at your level.

Here are the major issues I see on your resume:

VISUAL PRESENTATION

Your design is very flat and visually uneven. The appearance is not polished, and doesn’t say “experienced Contract Administrator”. By way of example, it’s like the difference between a professionally printed brochure, and one that was done at home and printed on an inkjet printer. For people at your level and experience, I’m used to seeing a much stronger visual appeal. In the real world this means your resume is at a disadvantage when the manager is culling the pile of resumes. The ideal resume format is airy, clean, and uncluttered, with the effective and strategic use of white space.

CONTENT

As I was reading your resume I was trying to imagine myself as a hiring manager, looking for that ideal Contract Administrator. I then asked myself whether I’d have picked your resume, and whether it was memorable. I concluded that much of the information was superficial and that in many instances it was too unclear. Simply put, I wouldn’t remember you. There are a lot of words on your resume, but they’re not formulated into powerful and impactful statements.

You have both an Objective and a Career summary. Having one or the other is fine, but not both. Objective statements are used often by recent graduates, so you may give the impression that you are not an experienced professional. In addition, your Career Summary is weak. It’s a critical element of your resume that should be designed to compel the hiring manager to keep reading. The purpose of this section is to define you as a professional and cover those areas most relevant to your career level and job target. By having a weak Career Summary, you are making it easier for the reviewer to say “pass” when your resume is given the customary cursory glance.

From a grammatical standpoint, I found your resume to possess many of the most common flaws. Expressions like “maintained” and “collaborated” are monotonous for the reader, and serve to repel versus attract their interest. There were some disagreements in case and punctuation and I also noticed that you often used passive language.

From the way the resume is worded, you come across as a “doer” not an “achiever”. Too many of your job descriptions are task based and not results based. Meaning they tell what you did, not what you achieved. To be effective and create excitement, a great resume helps the hiring manager visualize you delivering similar achievements at his or her company. By way of example, you can say you were responsible for managing a particular business process, or you can wow them by describing how you overhauled the process to deliver 50% higher results. Here are some examples of task based sentences in your resume.

Entered, tracked and maintained contract
Developed a comprehensive understanding
These statements are more about what you did, not what you achieved. It would be like you saying “I played tennis last week” when you could have said “I won the tennis tournament at my club last week unseating the person that held the title for the past three years.” Which sounds more impressive?

Employers want to know not only what you accomplished at your jobs, but the depth of those accomplishments. How did your work improve things, save money, etc. Employers are looking for return on investment (ROI).

Additional Issues

Also, I noticed that your resume changes emphasis patterns, which may make it difficult for some employers to follow. Successful resumes use emphasis elements in patterns that are easy for the eye to follow and that highlight the things that are most important to employers. This makes it easy for hiring executives to decide on whether to contact you or not.
It was difficult to give you a detailed critique, because your resume has limited information on your skills and achievements. Our professional resume writers can help you expand your resume so that employers have the necessary information to decide if they want to contact you.

Lastly, I'm a little concerned that you won't be found in resume databases. A well-designed resume includes the keywords and formatting that makes it easy for a resume parsing machine to learn about you and route you to a decision maker. I'm not suggesting you put a block of keywords in your resume. That just annoys recruiters. Rather, it's important that as you describe yourself, your accomplishments, and your skills, that you do it in a way that gives hints to the key word filtering system.

SUMMARY

Amanda, I’d like you to go back, reread your resume, and ask yourself whether it’s selling you short. Does it say “Amanda is a contract management support professional with tremendous expertise?” A great resume is the lynchpin in your job search, and I hate to see a strong person like you being underserved by something that’s so easy to fix.

NEXT STEPS

Most people are like you - they struggle to put themselves down on paper effectively, but that's where we come in. All the recommendations above can be combined in a cohesive, strategic manner so that you can distinguish yourself from other candidates. Our resume writers are experts in doing this. Countless studies have proven that professionally written resumes get more interviews, and, if it shortens your job search by even one day, a professional resume will pay for itself.

Purchasing the right resume writing service is important. You want to be sure you are getting everything you need to be successful in your job search without being nickel and dimed. The Jobfox Deluxe Package includes a Cover Letter (a $75 value), an Electronic Version of your resume (a $39 value), and Keyword Optimization (a $59 value). I’ve included the comparison below so you can see how the Jobfox Deluxe Package compares to other services. At $399 we are priced to be the best value service.

If you would prefer to pay in installments, we have a fantastic option that no other resume writing service provides: Six (6) payments of $69.95 per month. You will receive your professionally written resume now but have the advantage of paying for it over time.

To order your resume rewrite online, click here
Complaint comments Comments (106) Complaint country United States Complaint category Job & Career

Comments

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N  20th of Aug, 2010 by    +1 Votes
i found the free "critique" to have a few helpful things in it, but overall disagreed with much of what was said. apparently i have "at least one" typo or something in there, but i'm 99% certain that i don't (besides spell-check, my mom is an english teacher, and i doubt she'd steer me wrong).

one of my favorite sections:

Here’s the good news: My first impression of you is that you have an impressive array of skills and experiences. You’re a qualified graphic designer with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news: Your resume does not pass the 30-second test, and the content is not up to the standards one would expect from a candidate like you. Countless studies have proven that resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is selected to be interviewed. Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and overall writing standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting, and it didn’t make me want to run to the phone to call you. In short, your resume is effectively sabotaging your job search.

anyway, here's what i desperately want to write back, even though i know madeleine willis is probbaly not real:

Dear Madeline,

Thank you for your overview. Here's the good news: your critique has a few gems scattered throughout the verbose litany. Now, here's the bad news: a Google search for JobFox Resume Critique Reviews returns several results which look 95% identical to the cut-and-paste review which you "personalized" for me. It didn’t make me want to run to my wallet to pay you.
A  23rd of Aug, 2010 by    +1 Votes
Thanks so much, I got the same feeling about my resume - which btw was written by a pro and to have jobfox send me that letter I almost feel for it, but I knew better and began searching for information about it - I found it here. Thanks again
N  4th of Sep, 2010 by    +1 Votes
One more case here with a 90% similar resume review from a "Jobfox Resume Expert". Is that perhaps the name of the software Jobfox gave to the program that generates these shark style sales letters?

Honestly I was considering to buy Jobfox's Resume Writing service but I'm off the hook thanks to your postings. Good look on the job search to everybody.

M. Benavides.
A  10th of Sep, 2010 by    +1 Votes
Ok I was looking for something else, and then I find out somebody complaining about Bakos.com, and saying that Resumeedge.com is better... yes, you are right is better. Avoid jobfox.com also. I paid up to 350 dollars for a resume and a cover letter, mediocre job, they didn't have any idea of my market Architecture, they added so many things I didn't said I did or knew. After complaining, because they have a policy of non returning the money to unsatisfied costumer, I finally got at least something decent. And then three months later.. jajaja... the same woman that sold me this service, send me an email telling me that she has review my resume, and she found a lot that need it to be change, she actually copy and pasted them in the free review she did for me. And what a coincidence... is the same crappy resume you guys wrote to me, and the same crappy lines you added to my resume... Awful group of people. I always has done it with resumeedge but this time I wanted to try something different, bad idea.
A  30th of Sep, 2010 by    +1 Votes
Thank God I found this site! Me, like others here started to feeling now about how terrible my resume was, when I realized that my letter is basically the same as everyone else's. DON'T TRUST JOBFOX! It breaks my heart to think some poor sucker would dish out $400 bucks when he or she is looking for a job. The letter had many errors, like saying I was lacking a "summary" section (which I was not, I just called it something else), that I had gramatical errors (I did not, I had some odd company names here) and that I switched jobs often --which i also did not!!

So here's my letter:

Dear XXXXX,

I'm the Jobfox resume expert who was assigned to evaluate your resume. I reviewed your resume with the goal of giving you an honest, straightforward assessment of your current resume, and not a judgment of your skills and qualifications. I should warn you about my style: I'm direct and to the point, so I hope you won't be offended by my comments.

Having worked with many candidates at your career stage, I have some insight into what you are probably looking for in your next job. Most of my clients want to advance into a more senior position that will yield an increase in salary, or to advance into a role that has a career path to management in their next job. Others want to change professions or industries all together. Either way, their goal is to “take it up a notch” or do something new that will expand the depth or breadth of their experience.

Ironically, most job seekers at your stage in their career write resumes that are targeted toward a job that is below their most recent positions. Their resumes are full of the tasks they performed and responsibilities they had, but they do not tell the recruiter or hiring manager the impact they had on the business and why they were a valuable asset to the company. They don’t highlight their areas of expertise and as a result they do not distinguish themselves from the hundreds of other applicants seeking the same job.

So, let’s get started with a review of your resume:

Here’s the good news: My first impression of you is that you have an impressive array of skills and experiences. You’re a qualified project management professional with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news: Your resume does not pass the 30-second test, and the content is not up to the standards one would expect from a candidate like you. Countless studies have proven that resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is selected to be interviewed. Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and overall writing standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting, and it didn’t make me want to run to the phone to call you. In short, your resume is effectively sabotaging your job search.

XXXX, your resume is missing key elements that we see on the best resumes at your level of experience. Here are the major issues I see on your resume:

Your resume's visual presentation

We’ve all been told that looks don’t matter as much as substance, but in the case of your resume this just isn’t true. I found your design to be visually uneven. The appearance is not polished, and it doesn’t say “high potential Project Manager." Remember that your resume is your marketing tool. It’s the first impression a potential employer has of you. Now – think about how generic brands are marketed versus the name brand. The packaging, advertising and branding are all carefully selected to attract attention and convince you to buy. Your resume should do the same thing- you want to be the brand name product. I’m concerned that your resume is selling you like a generic, and that it’s not likely to get picked among those of other candidates. The ideal resume design is airy, clean, and uncluttered, with the effective and strategic use of white space.

The content of your resume

As I was reading your resume, I was trying to imagine myself as a hiring executive, looking for that ideal Project Manager. When I reviewed your resume, I asked myself if I could easily pick out your key attributes, experience, skills and accomplishments. A recruiter will do this to quickly decide if you’ll be successful in the job they have open. When I read your resume, the answer to that question was “no.” Here is one of the reasons why:

Your resume didn’t include a summary section, which stood out to me as a key deficiency. People at your level almost always include this critical element to compel the hiring manager to keep reading. The career summary content should provide hiring managers with a brief, yet detailed synopsis of what you bring to the table. The purpose of this section is to define you as a professional and cover those areas most relevant to your career level and job target. By not having this, you are making it easier for the reviewer to say “pass” when your resume is given the customary cursory glance.

From the way the resume is worded, you come across as a “doer, ” not an “achiever.” Too many of your job descriptions are task-based and not results-based. This means that they tell what you did, instead of what you achieved. This is a common mistake for non-professional resume writers. To be effective and create excitement, a great resume helps the hiring executive “envision” or “picture” you delivering similar achievements at his or her company. Here are some examples of task-based sentences in your resume:

Coordinated with different department leaders to develop project schedules
Managed the schedules of creative team to ensure deadlines were met
Employers want to know about your previous contributions and specifically how you’ve made a difference. More importantly, they want to know how you are going to make a significant difference at their company.

When I read your resume, I didn’t find compelling language that brings your work to life. I saw many passive words and non-action verbs. Phrases like “responsible for” and “provided” are overused, monotonous, and add no value to your resume. Strong action verbs, used with compelling language to outline exemplary achievements, are essential parts of a well-constructed resume.

Now, let’s put it all together. Here’s a real life example taken from a former client’s resume. By changing the language, we helped improve the perception of the candidate.

Passive language/ Doing: Negotiated contracts with vendors
Action language/ Achieving: Slashed payroll/benefits administration costs 30% by negotiating pricing and fees, while ensuring the continuation and enhancements of services.
A change like this makes a dramatic improvement. I hope you can see the difference when we implement action verbs, achievements, and results.

The writing on your resume

It’s easy to overlook errors in your resume. They could be typographical errors, inconsistent verb tenses, grammatical errors, punctuation problems, or misspelled words. You’ve rewritten the resume and proofed it multiple times so you may not notice the issue. But errors can be the kiss of death for your resume. Recruiters are reading your resume with fresh eyes, and they’re experts at finding errors. A misspelled word or punctuation error may not seem like a big deal, but to an employer these errors demonstrate unprofessionalism and a lack of attention to detail. That’s not the impression you want to leave. I spotted at least one of the above-mentioned errors on your resume.

Additional issues

• I liked your use of bullets to emphasize, but you probably want to consider limiting them in some areas to increase the impact to the employer. If they see too many bullets, they might find it difficult to zero in on the most important information. Size and type of bullets are also a consideration. Although seemingly minor, visual impact of a resume is the key to ensuring that an employer reads it thoroughly.

• One issue I noted was that you switched jobs often. Employers refer to this as 'job hopping' and may think your qualifications are great but not pursue you because they are afraid you won't stay for long. The good news is that there are definitely ways to elaborate on or even camouflage this to present a more steady work history.

My recommendation

Your resume is selling you short, and I recommend that you make the investment in having it professionally rewritten. Professional resume writers are skilled at writing a resume that is targeted to the job you aspire to have. They are trained to help move you up the ladder in your field or into a new profession or industry. They know how to take what seem to be mundane tasks, and then identify the achievements and results within so that recruiters and hiring managers take notice.

Putting your best resume forward now is critical. The sooner you invest in having your resume professionally written, the faster you increase your odds of landing a job you want. Once your old resume goes into a company’s database, it stays there permanently and could affect your candidacy for other jobs at that company as well. You will be amazed when you see the difference a professionally-written resume can make in presenting your credentials.

Many people ask a friend or colleague to help them write a resume. Sadly, unless they are an experienced, certified resume writer, this is usually a fatal mistake. The way hiring companies process resumes has changed dramatically. Many employers now use electronic tools to capture, evaluate, and screen their incoming resumes. In this environment, a resume must be constructed with the right structure, keywords, and format to be “processed” properly by a resume tracking system. It needs to be designed to be found, selected, and tracked for a hire to happen. This is known as keyword optimization, and most non-professionals are not well-versed in this important technique.

As I’m sure you know, be certain to send a cover letter when you forward your resume directly to a recruiter or hiring executive for a specific job. A well-written cover letter can give you a valuable edge over other candidates with similar skills. It’s the best way to make a memorable appeal that grabs attention and personally links you to the job. Use it to explain why you are uniquely qualified for the specific role. Jobfox can craft a custom cover letter that distinguishes you from the crowd (and it’s free when you purchase a professionally-written and formatted resume.)
A  4th of Oct, 2010 by    +1 Votes
I also took advantage of the "free" resume critique from JobFox. I also received the same response from "Madeline Willis". It was a little disheartening to read the negative feedback, I didn't think my resume was as bad as she described. After I calmed down a bit I realized this was a complete scam and they are playing on our emotions (especially if we are in between jobs and feeling a little down anyhow). Of course they are going to rip apart your resume; how else would they land business? I'm sorry everyone had the same experience, but very happy to know I'm not the only "victim". I've also unsubscribed to their relentless follow-up e-mails and will remove my profile from their website. If I was to rewrite my resume I might try to find someone locally who I can meet in person and discuss. I plan to do just that at a local job fair tomorrow.
A  2nd of Nov, 2010 by    +1 Votes
I am so glad I decided to research JobFox on Google. I received the standard computer generated letter this morning and have felt so depressed that I had a "simplistic in design" resume and I did not pass a "30 second interest test that would make a hiring manager pick up the phone and call me for an interview." Now I feel proud that I did not let a computer prey on my insecurities and hand over $400.00.
I will find a great job and I will not be defeated by a computer generated "cry for money"!
A  2nd of Nov, 2010 by    +1 Votes
Jobfox is a total scam. should have spend that money elsewhere :(
N  3rd of Nov, 2010 by    0 Votes
LOL. Yep...jobfox is full of $#!t! Same BS critique as everyone else here. The error on jobfox's part was my resume was professionally proofread by my field department Dean of my University and they gave it the same cookie cutter rubber stamp of rejection as everyone else. I don't know about most of you folks, but I am not able to stop their scam emails. The discontinue service to our service link is dysfunctional as well as many other links on their site (in other words, it's written there in stone now). The [censor] been sending me last day BS notices everyday for the last month flooding my email despite even putting "Jobfox, Job Fox" or any other variation third party affiliation in my treat as spam blocker within my browser security. If "Ya'll" are feeling this mess perhaps we should petition the Attorney General or FCC or whoever to extricate them from further commercial deceit. Just my thought on the matter.
A  7th of Nov, 2010 by    +1 Votes
I was thinking of getting a resume done myself and googled to find samples...just like all of you, I came up empty handed and ran into this forum. Thanks! Suggestion to everyone though, when jobfox asks you to evaluate your skills for each job in their questionnaires, it may be beneficial to use the the descriptions that they have there. They put their writing out for free w/o realizing it.
A  9th of Nov, 2010 by    +1 Votes
All I can say is wow. I had my resume constructed with the support of a career transition advisor. Granted, not a professional resume writer, but her skills showed through in a number of ways. When I got the review of my resume I was floored and started to question the quality of my resume, despite a few calls I have received from prospective employers. I was minutes away from purchasing Jobfox's second and lowest offer of $299.
I cannot express how glad I did a search and found so many people willing to take the time to share their experience. I had the same wording, structure and comments as many of the examples listed. Too bad because aside from some of the errors, they have a compelling sales pitch. Thanks everyone for speaking out.
N  29th of Nov, 2010 by    +1 Votes
JOBFOX IS A SCAM
DO NOT USE JOBFOX
DO NOT OPEN AN EMAIL FROM JOBFOX.
A  31st of Dec, 2010 by    +1 Votes
I just found JobFox and got a similar critique on my resume. In my numerous years of putting out resumes and looking for work, I have never found anyone who agrees on what a resume should have and how it should look. So paying someone to fix it is a total scam and waste of money.
A  23rd of Jan, 2011 by    +1 Votes
I am so glad I checked into this company. I cant believe the tactics they use to bully people into buying their resume services. Thank God for the resume templetes in Microsoft Word saves you from shelling out $400.00 for this mindless piece of crap service.
N  27th of Jan, 2011 by    +1 Votes
For all of you $400 richer, spread the word about the JF services/scam. My friend had the people at JF re-write her resume and it did not get her any leads or any responses that Jobfox promised. As an experiment she submitted the resume that Jobfox re-wrote for her as a different user and GUESS WHAT???? they sent the same critique of a resume they wrote saying she should use their services. When she emailed the resume writer she never got a response.
A  31st of Jan, 2011 by    +1 Votes
Thank you all for posting your experience with JobFox. I received exactly the same letter. However, I did not fall for it because I had my resume seen by a resume writer. This is such an unethical practice!
If you really want to improve your resume, I suggest a book by Robin Ryan, the title is "Winning Resumes" you could check it out from a public library, is totally no brainer and step by step and it did make a difference in the number of responses I got from recruiters, ( AND YOU DON'T HAVE TO SPEND 400 DOLLARS!) I am still looking for jobs, the competition is fierce but keep trying. Good luck !
A  13th of Feb, 2011 by    +1 Votes
I usually do a research on site before spending anything and i am thankful to everyone on this discussion board and especially to members of Complaint Boards to provide detailed insights of this company and the likes. Saved lots of bucks!! :-)
A  28th of Feb, 2011 by    +1 Votes
Thank to everyone who posted here, you saved me a lot of money. I thought the text sounded canned and now I know it was. Below is my critique and you can see the name of the write is different but the comments are the same. I especially love the part about my contact information not being easy to find since it is clearly at the top of both pages of my resume! What a scam!

From: Bridget Hart
Subject: Your Jobfox Resume Critique

You requested a critique while visiting Beyond.com (or one of their affiliates).

Dear XXXXXXX,

I'm the Jobfox resume expert who was assigned to review your resume, and I specialize in reviewing resumes for candidates who are high-income earners or executives. I evaluated your resume with the goal of giving you an honest, straightforward assessment of your current resume, and not a judgment of your skills and qualifications. I should warn you about my style: I'm direct and to the point, so I hope you won't be offended by my comments. I enjoy working with clients at your level because the impact my recommendations can have on shortening your job search or helping you land a higher paying job is astounding. My clients generally assume that their resumes are in great shape. After all, it has served them well in the past. But at your level, and in this economic climate, the competition for the best jobs is tougher than ever and using anything less than an outstanding resume is a mistake.

So, let’s get started on reviewing your resume:

Here’s the good news: My first impression of you is that you have an impressive array of skills and experiences. You’re a qualified retail management professional with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news: Your resume does not pass the 30-second test, and the content is not up to the standards one would expect from a candidate like you. Countless studies have proven that resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is selected to be interviewed. Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and overall writing standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting, and it didn’t make me want to run to the phone to call you. In short, your resume is effectively sabotaging your job search.

Michael, your resume is missing key elements that we see on the best resumes at your level of experience.

Here are areas for improvement on your resume:

Your resume's visual presentation

The resume I am viewing for your critique is in plain text format, so I will only make one comment on the visual presentation. I do, however, have more than enough information to comment on the content, sequence, and grammatical elements and they are the most important factors to consider in a resume. Regarding the text version of your resume, it looks like you converted it from another file format and did not delete the extraneous characters. I recommend you create a cleaned up text version of your resume that can be used on sites that require you to cut and paste your resume into a form or upload a text version. I assume you have a Word version of your resume that you use for interviews and uploading to sites that accept Word. If you have a Jobfox profile, be sure to upload the Word version. It will be typically much more visually appealing to employers when you have designed it correctly.

The content of your resume

As I was reading your resume, I was trying to imagine myself as a hiring executive, looking for that ideal retail management professional. When I reviewed your resume, I asked myself if I could easily pick out your key attributes, experience, skills and accomplishments. A recruiter will do this to quickly decide if you’ll be successful in the job they have open. When I read your resume, the answer to that question was “no.” Here is one of the reasons why:

Your career summary is weak. It’s a critical element of your resume that should be designed to compel the hiring manager to keep reading. The purpose of this section is to define you as a professional and cover those areas most relevant to your career level and job target. By having a weak career summary, you are making it easier for the reviewer to say “pass” when your resume is given the customary cursory glance.

From the way the resume is worded, you come across as a “doer, ” not an “achiever.” Too many of your job descriptions are task-based and not results-based. This means that they tell what you did, instead of what you achieved. This is a common mistake for non-professional resume writers. To be effective and create excitement, a great resume helps the hiring executive “envision” or “picture” you delivering similar achievements at his or her company. Here are some examples of task-based sentences in your resume:

Provided high level P&L analysis to aid Territory Leaders in achieving KPIs within their assigned areas
Supported Eastern division: 2 VPs of Operations, 6 Territory Leaders and 107 stores
Employers want to know about your previous contributions and specifically how you’ve made a difference. More importantly, they want to know how you are going to make a significant difference at their company.

When I read your resume, I didn’t find compelling language that brings your work to life. I saw many passive words and non-action verbs. Phrases like “provided” and “served as” are overused, monotonous, and add no value to your resume. Strong action verbs, used with compelling language to outline exemplary achievements, are essential parts of a well-constructed resume.

Now, let’s put it all together. Here’s a real life example taken from a former client’s resume. By changing the language, we helped improve the perception of the candidate.

Passive language/ Doing: Responsible for managing national marketing plans
Action language/ Achieving: Maintained full responsibility for creating and managing national marketing initiatives that boosted revenue levels by 50% within multiple organizations
A change like this makes a dramatic improvement. I hope you can see the difference when we implement action verbs, achievements, and results.

It’s easy to overlook errors in your resume. They could be typographical errors, inconsistent verb tenses, grammatical errors, punctuation problems, or misspelled words. You’ve rewritten the resume and proofed it multiple times so you may not notice the issue. But errors can be the kiss of death for your resume. Recruiters are reading your resume with fresh eyes, and they’re experts at finding errors. A misspelled word or punctuation error may not seem like a big deal, but to an employer these errors demonstrate unprofessionalism and a lack of attention to detail. That’s not the impression you want to leave. I spotted at least one of the above-mentioned errors on your resume.

Additional Issues

• You want to make sure that employers can easily read and locate your name and contact information so that they can reach out to you directly when they are interested. If an employer has to hunt for your contact information, or if contact information is missing, your resume could be overlooked.

My recommendation

Your resume is not doing you justice. Consider making the investment in having your resume professionally written and formatted. Let our 100k+ and executive resume experts incorporate all the best practices that will help you sell your capabilities and maximize your compensation. The high level managers who will review your resume will be sophisticated and discerning, and you cannot afford to have an average resume. You need to stand out to win an interview slot for the jobs you want.

Putting your best resume forward now is critical. The sooner you invest in having your resume professionally written, the faster you increase your odds of landing a job you really want. Once your old resume goes into a company’s database or starts to circulate in your network, it’s hard to pull back, and it could affect your candidacy for future openings. You will be amazed when you see the difference our professional resume experts can make in presenting your credentials.

Many people ask a friend or colleague to help them write a resume. Sadly, unless they are an experienced, certified resume writer, this is usually a fatal mistake. The way hiring companies process resumes has changed dramatically. Many employers now use electronic tools to capture, evaluate, and screen their incoming resumes. In this environment, a resume must be constructed with the right structure, keywords, and format to be “processed” properly by a resume tracking system. It needs to be designed to be found, selected, and tracked for a hire to happen. This is known as keyword optimization, and most non-professionals are not well-versed in this important technique.

As I’m sure you know, be certain to send a cover letter when you forward your resume directly to a recruiter or hiring executive for a specific job. A well-written cover letter can give you a valuable edge over other candidates with similar skills. It’s the best way to make a memorable appeal that grabs attention and personally links you to the job. Use it to explain why you are uniquely qualified for the specific role. Jobfox can craft a custom cover letter that distinguishes you from the crowd (and it’s free when you purchase a professionally-written and formatted resume.)
N  28th of Feb, 2011 by    +1 Votes
You are not alone. They are a scam.
A  2nd of Apr, 2011 by    +1 Votes
In short, I took the bait and have paid numerous payments of $69.95 for nothing to speak of. I was told by one potential employer that my 'new and improved Jobfox resume' was confusing. I ended up "fixing" it myself, and I still have the same job I had when I first used Jobfox more than a year ago, and I am far from an entry level manager. I have more that 10 years experience in management with increasing responsibility, proven results, etc. Fortunately, one of my bonuses from my current job helped offset the money I wasted, but then again the money spent on Jobfox could have gone toward a charity or a pair of new shoes, or a day at the spa. Do you feel my regret...my pain? There is nothing like getting got by one of these scams when you are looking for legitimate help breaking out of the box.

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