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JobFox.com Resume Critiques

Posted:    

Generic Computer Generated Critiques

Complaint Rating:  98 % with 122 votes
98% 122
4.9
Contact information:
JobFox.com
United States
jobfox.com
JobFox.com provides generic critiques generated by a computer. I had the opportunity to have a critique shared with me by two of my clients. It was apparent to me that it was a form letter and computer generated, because it had the following problems:

1. Wrong job title used throughout the document in both instances.
2. Provided no real advice on how to fix the "mundane" and "flat" resumes.
3. Called the clients' experience "pudding in a cup." Yes, pudding in a cup.
4. Pulled out half of two bullet points and stated that those bullet points didn't have accomplishments in them.
5. Said that one of the clients had an objective and a career summary. The resume had niether. I would never include an objective on any resume.
6. Indicates that only entry-level candidates have an objective. Well, there is no objective and the client is an entry-level candidate.
7. Makes a point that the resumes change case and emphasis. Untrue.
8. Said the resumes do not contain keywords, when the software clearly pulls out keywords to create the "critique."
9. It's insulting to the reader and tries to convince the person that they need to spend about $400 to fix his/her resume.

Real resume writing companies, with true experts, will be comfortable showing you examples of what they can do. This company does not.

JobFox.com fails on all accounts on this one. In case you are interested I have included the information in this complaint. Below is one of the critques for a client that had two months of experience and a certification:
____________________
I'm the Jobfox resume expert that was assigned to critique your resume. I reviewed your resume with the goal of giving you an honest, straightforward assessment of your current resume, and not a judgment of your skills and qualifications. I should warn you about my style: I'm direct and to the point, so I hope you won't be offended by my comments. My perspective is that resumes get chosen, not candidates. In a perfect world, interview candidates would be selected based on their strengths and experiences. In reality, this isn't how the process works. A recruiter chooses the short list of candidates from a pile of resumes. Meaning, we have to make sure your resume does the heavy lifting in the selection process.

Here’s the good news: my first impression of you is that you are off to a good start in your career. You’re an up and coming contract management support professional, with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news: your resume isn’t doing a good job saying that to an employer. I found it to be mundane and unlikely to catch an employer’s attention. If you were selling yourself as Crème Brulee, it’s as if your resume is saying “pudding in a cup”.

Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and organizational standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting and it didn’t make me want to run to the phone to call you. These days, employers are being flooded with resumes, and we need yours to compel a hiring manager to continue reading and contact you for an interview. Countless studies have proven that resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is selected to be interviewed.

Amanda, to be honest with you, I think you should view this version of your resume as a work in progress. It's missing many key elements that we like to see on resumes at your level.

Here are the major issues I see on your resume:

VISUAL PRESENTATION

Your design is very flat and visually uneven. The appearance is not polished, and doesn’t say “experienced Contract Administrator”. By way of example, it’s like the difference between a professionally printed brochure, and one that was done at home and printed on an inkjet printer. For people at your level and experience, I’m used to seeing a much stronger visual appeal. In the real world this means your resume is at a disadvantage when the manager is culling the pile of resumes. The ideal resume format is airy, clean, and uncluttered, with the effective and strategic use of white space.

CONTENT

As I was reading your resume I was trying to imagine myself as a hiring manager, looking for that ideal Contract Administrator. I then asked myself whether I’d have picked your resume, and whether it was memorable. I concluded that much of the information was superficial and that in many instances it was too unclear. Simply put, I wouldn’t remember you. There are a lot of words on your resume, but they’re not formulated into powerful and impactful statements.

You have both an Objective and a Career summary. Having one or the other is fine, but not both. Objective statements are used often by recent graduates, so you may give the impression that you are not an experienced professional. In addition, your Career Summary is weak. It’s a critical element of your resume that should be designed to compel the hiring manager to keep reading. The purpose of this section is to define you as a professional and cover those areas most relevant to your career level and job target. By having a weak Career Summary, you are making it easier for the reviewer to say “pass” when your resume is given the customary cursory glance.

From a grammatical standpoint, I found your resume to possess many of the most common flaws. Expressions like “maintained” and “collaborated” are monotonous for the reader, and serve to repel versus attract their interest. There were some disagreements in case and punctuation and I also noticed that you often used passive language.

From the way the resume is worded, you come across as a “doer” not an “achiever”. Too many of your job descriptions are task based and not results based. Meaning they tell what you did, not what you achieved. To be effective and create excitement, a great resume helps the hiring manager visualize you delivering similar achievements at his or her company. By way of example, you can say you were responsible for managing a particular business process, or you can wow them by describing how you overhauled the process to deliver 50% higher results. Here are some examples of task based sentences in your resume.

Entered, tracked and maintained contract
Developed a comprehensive understanding
These statements are more about what you did, not what you achieved. It would be like you saying “I played tennis last week” when you could have said “I won the tennis tournament at my club last week unseating the person that held the title for the past three years.” Which sounds more impressive?

Employers want to know not only what you accomplished at your jobs, but the depth of those accomplishments. How did your work improve things, save money, etc. Employers are looking for return on investment (ROI).

Additional Issues

Also, I noticed that your resume changes emphasis patterns, which may make it difficult for some employers to follow. Successful resumes use emphasis elements in patterns that are easy for the eye to follow and that highlight the things that are most important to employers. This makes it easy for hiring executives to decide on whether to contact you or not.
It was difficult to give you a detailed critique, because your resume has limited information on your skills and achievements. Our professional resume writers can help you expand your resume so that employers have the necessary information to decide if they want to contact you.

Lastly, I'm a little concerned that you won't be found in resume databases. A well-designed resume includes the keywords and formatting that makes it easy for a resume parsing machine to learn about you and route you to a decision maker. I'm not suggesting you put a block of keywords in your resume. That just annoys recruiters. Rather, it's important that as you describe yourself, your accomplishments, and your skills, that you do it in a way that gives hints to the key word filtering system.

SUMMARY

Amanda, I’d like you to go back, reread your resume, and ask yourself whether it’s selling you short. Does it say “Amanda is a contract management support professional with tremendous expertise?” A great resume is the lynchpin in your job search, and I hate to see a strong person like you being underserved by something that’s so easy to fix.

NEXT STEPS

Most people are like you - they struggle to put themselves down on paper effectively, but that's where we come in. All the recommendations above can be combined in a cohesive, strategic manner so that you can distinguish yourself from other candidates. Our resume writers are experts in doing this. Countless studies have proven that professionally written resumes get more interviews, and, if it shortens your job search by even one day, a professional resume will pay for itself.

Purchasing the right resume writing service is important. You want to be sure you are getting everything you need to be successful in your job search without being nickel and dimed. The Jobfox Deluxe Package includes a Cover Letter (a $75 value), an Electronic Version of your resume (a $39 value), and Keyword Optimization (a $59 value). I’ve included the comparison below so you can see how the Jobfox Deluxe Package compares to other services. At $399 we are priced to be the best value service.

If you would prefer to pay in installments, we have a fantastic option that no other resume writing service provides: Six (6) payments of $69.95 per month. You will receive your professionally written resume now but have the advantage of paying for it over time.

To order your resume rewrite online, click here
Complaint comments Comments (106) Complaint country United States Complaint category Job & Career

Comments

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N  31st of Aug, 2009 by    +3 Votes
I've just gotten back my resume 'critique' from JobFox, that was presumably done by a professional. I can confirm that it is a computer generated form letter as it looks nearly identical to the one you posted, of course, with the exception of the various specifics it pulled out of my resume. This is quite unfortunate because the site is deliberately misleading job seekers for the purpose of enticing them to purchase its resume writing service. What a scam!

-b
A  10th of Sep, 2009 by    +2 Votes
Got a similar form letter with about 80% of it using the exact same wording. The 'pudding in a cup' metaphor was replaced with the phrase 'cold dead fish instead of sushi'. The overall analysis and conclusions are identical.
A  18th of Sep, 2009 by    +2 Votes
I just received my resume critique from JobFox and about 90% of it is using the exact same wording as above. It is misleading and a scam to purchase its resume writing service.
A  22nd of Sep, 2009 by    +2 Votes
I got the same "pudding" form letter. Same experience trying to e-mail the company: The customer service address on the privacy policy page returns automatic notification that the box does not accept e-mail. The link below "Send E-mail" on the "contact us" page leads to the so-called "help" articles.

I called the company phone number and left voice mail asking for my account to be removed. I will be shocked if I hear from anyone.

Meanwhile, I've gotten a second instance of the initial "I critiqued your resume" message and now a follow-up message that urges me to buy JobFox's resume services. The "unsubscribe" link in the message is dead. The link that enables me to spend money works just fine. I replied to "Madeline" with this observation. Again, I will be very surprised if I get a personal response.

JobFox sux.
A  22nd of Sep, 2009 by    +2 Votes
I got the same pudding in a cup message it is a rip off and they should be thrown under the jail for trying to take advantage of hard working people while they are down due to the state of the economy.
A  24th of Sep, 2009 by    +1 Votes
This is an unethical business practice that is strongly discouraged by a number of respected Resume Writing practices. Consumer Tip: If you want to have your resume critiqued, Google the company you want to inquire with prior to submitting your request. If you see these types of complaints move on to the next company. When you find one with no complaints it should receive a critique that has merit.

Best wishes
A  24th of Sep, 2009 by    +3 Votes
Here was mine...
If you were selling yourself as Sizzling Grilled Steak, it’s as if your resume is saying "cooked meat."

Thanks to all for posting. A relief to not be scammed...
A  25th of Sep, 2009 by    +2 Votes
Same here. I had about 90% of the same material in my review. Grrr.

This company won't last long.

Melanie Howe (supposed resume expert from JobFox), you are the "pudding in a cup."
N  28th of Sep, 2009 by    +2 Votes
I'm also "cooked meat". Oh well. To all of you dead fish and pudding in cups I guess that you won't get a job because Job Fox says so. I just wish I hadn't gotten the free critique because now I keep getting emails saying I need to have a "professional" write my resume. Glad I found this complaint because I was upset about the suggestion that I am "cooked meat" when I really am a vegetarian.
A  30th of Sep, 2009 by    +2 Votes
whoa!! I'm so glad I looked up this site before I shelled out 400 bucks, in this economy when people are out of work its a shame that these snakes are out her taking advantage. I have not had a resume done in 10 years and when I had mine done it costs about 40 dollars, I know the years are pass and things cost more but 400? that IS alot. Thank you for saving money for me I really did not have. I will get my resume done over and it will be just as good but for less. By the way I think the reason it is so expensive is that they claim the people who are hired to do these are trained, they have 10-20 years expertise in the job market etc...They also have a check list comparing the company to two others, of course Jobfox gets all the checks! and the other two companies are lacking...boy I tell you people be careful!
N  1st of Oct, 2009 by    0 Votes
I received a similar critique. These days we have to expect that this kind of document will be heavily computer assisted. Also, a lot of resumes do have common shortcomings. So why is everyone surprised that there is a lot of commonality among the critiques?

As far as I see, it is still possible this may be a good value. The proof would be a report from someone who has purchased the resume package. I have found none on the web so far. I'm not sure I want to be that person, though :-)
A  2nd of Oct, 2009 by    +1 Votes
My critique stated "it’s as if your resume is saying “pudding in a cup”." in a sentence as well. The "Your design is very flat and cluttered. The appearance is not polished, " statement annoyed me because a professional already contributed expertise to my resume.

I found the statement "Employers want to know not only what you accomplished at your jobs, but the depth of those accomplishments." helpful, but somewhat vague.

If the service was under $100, it would be in a reasonable price range. For $399, I will pass.
N  3rd of Oct, 2009 by    +1 Votes
LOL I love you guys. I feel better now. I got the same obviously computer generated "critique." Good luck everybody!
A  7th of Oct, 2009 by    0 Votes
Obed1, it is not possible that it is valid criticism at all, since the critique was wrong on several accounts. Check for factual errors. I provide a list of about 8 factual errors the "critiquer" used. These would have been picked up by a human. A computer program would not.
A  7th of Oct, 2009 by    0 Votes
Here is another one which someone provided to me. For one, the critique uses the wrong job title throughout. It actually uses the name of the employer rather than the person's title. Also, the person is an entry-level candidate. Please note that the computer doesn't even realize this:

I'm the Jobfox resume expert that was assigned to critique your resume. I
> reviewed your resume with the goal of giving you an honest,
> straightforward assessment of your current resume, and not a judgment of
> your skills and qualifications. I should warn you about my style: I'm
> direct and to the point, so I hope you won't be offended by my comments.
> My perspective is that resumes get chosen, not candidates. In a perfect
> world, interview candidates would be selected based on their strengths and
> experiences. In reality, this isn't how the process works. A recruiter
> chooses the short list of candidates from a pile of resumes. Meaning, we
> have to make sure your resume does the heavy lifting in the selection
> process.
>
> Here’s the good news: my first impression of you is that you have an
> impressive array of skills and experiences. You’re a qualified GE
> Consultants, with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news:
> your resume isn’t doing a good job saying that to an employer. I found it
> to be drab, uninspiring, and unlikely to catch anyone’s attention. If you
> were selling yourself as sushi, it’s as if your resume is saying "cold,
> dead, raw fish."
>
> Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and organizational
> standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more
> about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting and it didn’t make me want to
> run to the phone to call you. These days, employers are being flooded with
> resumes, and we need yours to compel a hiring manager to continue reading
> and contact you for an interview. Countless studies have proven that
> resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is
> selected to be interviewed.
>
> XXX, to be honest with you, I think you should view this version of your
> resume as a work in progress. It's missing many key elements that we like
> to see on resumes at your level.
>
> Here are the major issues I see on your resume:
>
> VISUAL PRESENTATION
>
> Your design is very crowded. The appearance is not polished, and doesn’t
> say “experienced GE Consultants.” By way of example, it’s like the
> difference between a professionally printed brochure, and one that was
> created on a home computer. For people at your level and experience, I’m
> used to seeing a much stronger visual appeal. In the real world this means
> your resume is at a disadvantage when the manager is culling the pile of
> resumes. The ideal resume format is airy, clean, and uncluttered, with the
> effective and strategic use of white space.
>
> CONTENT
>
> Your resume has an Objective instead of a Career Summary. An objective is
> more for a new college grad or someone very early in their career. A
> Career Summary is a critical element of your resume and it should be
> designed to compel the hiring manager to keep reading. The purpose of this
> section is to define you as a professional and cover those areas most
> relevant to your career level and job target. By not having this you are
> making it easier for the reviewer to say “pass” when your resume is given
> the customary cursory glance.
>
> From the way the resume is worded, you come across as a “doer” not an
> “achiever.” Too many of your job descriptions are task based and not
> results based. Meaning they tell what you did, not what you achieved. To
> be effective and create excitement, a great resume helps the hiring
> manager visualize you delivering similar achievements at his or her
> company. By way of example, you can say you were responsible for managing
> a particular business process, or you can wow them by describing how you
> overhauled the process to deliver 50% higher results. Here are some
> examples of task based sentences in your resume.
>
> * Assisted in sewer main inspection and remediation program
> * Duties included material testing for proper grain size distribution,
> compaction, moisture content, and other geotechnical properties
>
> These statements are more about what you did, not what you achieved. It
> would be like you saying “I played golf last week” when you could have
> said “I won the men’s golf tournament at my club last week unseating the
> guy that held the title for the past three years.” Which sounds more
> impressive?
>
> As I was reading your resume I was trying to imagine myself as a hiring
> manager, looking for that ideal GE Consultants. I then asked myself
> whether I’d have picked your resume, and whether it was memorable. I
> concluded that much of the information was superficial and that in many
> instances it was too brief. Simply put, I wouldn’t remember you. There are
> a lot of words on your resume, but they’re not formulated into powerful
> and impactful statements.
>
> Employers want to know not only what you accomplished at your jobs, but
> the depth of those accomplishments. How did your work improve things, save
> money, etc. Employers are looking for return on investment (ROI).
>
> Additional Issues
>
> Lastly, I'm a little concerned that you won't be found in resume
> databases. A well-designed resume includes the keywords and formatting
> that makes it easy for a resume parsing machine to learn about you and
> route you to a decision maker. I'm not suggesting you put a block of
> keywords in your resume. That just annoys recruiters. Rather, it's
> important that as you describe yourself, your accomplishments, and your
> skills, that you do it in a way that gives hints to the key word filtering
> system.
>
> SUMMARY
>xxx, I’d like you to go back, reread your resume, and ask yourself
> whether it’s selling you short. Does it say “Chris is a GE
> Consultants with tremendous expertise?” A great resume is the lynchpin in
> your job search, and I hate to see a strong person like you being
> underserved by something that’s so easy to fix.
>
> NEXT STEPS
>
> Most people are like you - they struggle to put themselves down on paper
> effectively, but that's where we come in. All the recommendations above
> can be combined in a cohesive, strategic manner so that you can
> distinguish yourself from other candidates. Our resume writers are experts
> in doing this. Countless studies have proven that professionally written
> resumes get more interviews, and, if it shortens your job search by even
> one day, a professional resume will pay for itself.
>
> Purchasing the right resume writing service is important. You want to be
> sure you are getting everything you need to be successful in your job
> search without being nickel and dimed. The Jobfox Deluxe Package includes
> a Cover Letter (a $75 value), an Electronic Version of your resume (a $39
> value), and Keyword Optimization (a $59 value). I’ve included the
> comparison below so you can see how the Jobfox Deluxe Package compares to
> other services. At $399 we are priced to be the best value service.
>
> If you would prefer to pay in installments, we have a fantastic option
> that no other resume writing service provides: Six (6) payments of $69.95
> per month. You will receive your professionally written resume now but
> have the advantage of paying for it over time.
>
> To order your resume rewrite online, click here
>
A  14th of Oct, 2009 by    0 Votes
Indeed, it appears that the "professional resume critique" is simply a canned, computer-generated response...

The following is the "professional resume critique" I received from JobFox.

Does it look familiar to you?

It should.


Dear XXX,

I'm the Jobfox resume expert that was assigned to critique your resume. I reviewed your resume with the goal of giving you an honest, straightforward assessment of your current resume, and not a judgment of your skills and qualifications. I should warn you about my style: I'm direct and to the point, so I hope you won't be offended by my comments. My perspective is that resumes get chosen, not candidates. In a perfect world, interview candidates would be selected based on their strengths and experiences. In reality, this isn't how the process works. A recruiter chooses the short list of candidates from a pile of resumes. Meaning, we have to make sure your resume does the heavy lifting in the selection process.

Here’s the good news: my first impression of you is that you have an impressive array of skills and experiences. You’re a qualified Construction Superintendent, with a lot to offer an employer. Now, here’s the bad news: your resume isn’t doing a good job saying that to an employer. I found it to be drab, uninspiring, and unlikely to catch anyone’s attention. If you were selling yourself as sushi, it’s as if your resume is saying "cold, dead, raw fish."

Your resume needs a boost from a visual, content, and organizational standpoint to engage the reader. It needs to make them want to learn more about you. I didn’t find it to be exciting and it didn’t make me want to run to the phone to call you. These days, employers are being flooded with resumes, and we need yours to compel a hiring manager to continue reading and contact you for an interview. Countless studies have proven that resume quality is the key determinant as to whether a candidate is selected to be interviewed.

XXX, to be honest with you, I think you should view this version of your resume as a work in progress. It's missing many key elements that we like to see on resumes at your level.

Here are the major issues I see on your resume:

VISUAL PRESENTATION

Your design is very flat. The appearance is not polished, and doesn’t say “experienced Construction Superintendent.” By way of example, it’s like the difference between a professionally printed brochure, and one that was done at home and printed on an inkjet printer. For people at your level and experience, I’m used to seeing a much stronger visual appeal. In the real world this means your resume is at a disadvantage when the manager is culling the pile of resumes. The ideal resume format is airy, clean, and uncluttered, with the effective and strategic use of white space.

CONTENT

As I was reading your resume I was trying to imagine myself as a hiring manager, looking for that ideal Construction Superintendent. I then asked myself whether I’d have picked your resume, and whether it was memorable. I concluded that much of the information was superficial and that in many instances it was too brief. Simply put, I wouldn’t remember you. There are a lot of words on your resume, but they’re not formulated into powerful and impactful statements.

Your resume has an Objective instead of a Career Summary. An Objective is more for a new college grad or someone very early in their career. A Career Summary is a critical element of your resume and it should be designed to compel the hiring manager to keep reading. The purpose of this section is to define you as a professional and cover those areas most relevant to your career level and job target. By not having this you are making it easier for the reviewer to say “pass” when your resume is given the customary cursory glance.

From a grammatical standpoint, I found your resume to possess many of the most common flaws. Expressions like “Responsible for” and “Maintai ” are monotonous for the reader, and serve to repel versus attract their interest.

From the way the resume is worded, you come across as a “doer” not an “achiever.” Too many of your job descriptions are task based and not results based. Meaning they tell what you did, not what you achieved. To be effective and create excitement, a great resume helps the hiring manager visualize you delivering similar achievements at his or her company. By way of example, you can say you were responsible for managing a particular business process, or you can wow them by describing how you overhauled the process to deliver 50% higher results. Here are some examples of task based sentences in your resume.

Responsible for the direct supervision
Maintain accurate daily timecards
These statements are more about what you did, not what you achieved. It would be like you saying “I played golf last week” when you could have said “I won the men’s golf tournament at my club last week unseating the guy that held the title for the past three years.” Which sounds more impressive?

Additional Issues

I noticed that your resume changes emphasis patterns, which may make it difficult for some employers to follow. Successful resumes use emphasis elements in patterns that are easy for the eye to follow and that highlight the things that are most important to employers. This makes it easy for hiring executives to decide on whether to contact you or not.
I liked your use of bullets to emphasize, but you probably want to consider limiting them in some areas to increase impact to the employer. If they see too many bullets, they might find it difficult to zero in on the most important information.You want to make sure that employers can easily read and locate your name and contact information so that they can reach out to you directly when they are interested. If an employer has to hunt for your contact information, or if contact information is missing, your resume could be overlooked. Also, be sure that your contact information appears on all pages of the resume.

Lastly, I'm a little concerned that you won't be found in resume databases. A well-designed resume includes the keywords and formatting that makes it easy for a resume parsing machine to learn about you and route you to a decision maker. I'm not suggesting you put a block of keywords in your resume. That just annoys recruiters. Rather, it's important that as you describe yourself, your accomplishments, and your skills, that you do it in a way that gives hints to the key word filtering system.

SUMMARY

XXX, I’d like you to go back, reread your resume, and ask yourself whether it’s selling you short. Does it say “XXX is a Construction Superintendent with tremendous expertise?” A great resume is the lynchpin in your job search, and I hate to see a strong person like you being underserved by something that’s so easy to fix.

NEXT STEPS

Most people are like you - they struggle to put themselves down on paper effectively, but that's where we come in. All the recommendations above can be combined in a cohesive, strategic manner so that you can distinguish yourself from other candidates. Our resume writers are experts in doing this. Countless studies have proven that professionally written resumes get more interviews, and, if it shortens your job search by even one day, a professional resume will pay for itself.

Purchasing the right resume writing service is important. You want to be sure you are getting everything you need to be successful in your job search without being nickel and dimed. The Jobfox Deluxe Package includes a Cover Letter (a $75 value), an Electronic Version of your resume (a $39 value), and Keyword Optimization (a $59 value). I’ve included the comparison below so you can see how the Jobfox Deluxe Package compares to other services. At $399 we are priced to be the best value service.

If you would prefer to pay in installments, we have a fantastic option that no other resume writing service provides: Six (6) payments of $69.95 per month. You will receive your professionally written resume now but have the advantage of paying for it over time.

THIS IS A COMPLETE SCAM.

I've written to them with many pertinent questions.

I've never received a response other than more of the same marketing gibberish.

I have since removed my email address from their mailing list.
A  15th of Oct, 2009 by    +1 Votes
Thank you for your postings. The examples made things very clear...I was beginning to feel inept, as though I were "Pudding in a cup". I am sadly disappointed by the company and their bad morals. Their means of getting sales by brow beating and name calling is a form of abuse! It is getting a person down to their lowest and then telling them for a price of $400.00 they will become "Crème Brulee"...("A better person"). I think "jobfox" is AKA: "DEAD FISH".
Sincerely,
"Crème Brulee & Pudding-in-a-Cup"
a desirable, smart and loving person:)...not to mention $400.00 richer!!!
N  20th of Oct, 2009 by    +1 Votes
Thanks everyone for the postings. I was feeling a little down after reading the critique of my resume but decided to check for complaints, and thank God I found this site. I just saved myself $400. I was one of the "pudding in a cup" critiqued receivers. Currently checking for legitimate resume writers at much lower cost. JOBFOX taking money from unsuspecting job hunters when we need help is such a shameful, cruddy tactic.
A.H.
A  22nd of Oct, 2009 by    +1 Votes
YUP! I got one too. From Melanie Howe. I hope these people burn in hell because it's horrible that they make already depressed unemployed people feel insecure. I got this email and it just stung. I've been having trouble finding a job, and I feel down enough as it is, and then I get this horrible email from Ms. Melanie Howe telling me that it's MY FAULT. Then I started to realize that the tips she was giving me didn't make any sense and Googled Jobfox and realized it's a computer-generated letter.

It just makes me sad knowing that there's companies out there preying on the vulnerable and it scares me to think that there's a big chance that some poor depressed unemployed person got this email and took it seriously, didn't have the $400 and perhaps took their life or something else drastic. Unemployment is difficult enough. Have some humanity! It sickens me to know that there are people running scams like this. I might be broke and unemployed, but I have the decency to never partake in a scheme like this. I would sooner be a hooker than stoop as low as the evil people behind this fictional Melanie Howe. SHAME ON YOU and KARMA IS A B*TCH. I hope it hits you 100xs as bad.
A  23rd of Oct, 2009 by    +1 Votes
Thanks to all of you, I'd almost fell for the scam, and today October 23, 2009 received my critique and OMG, it
was identical as ConcernedRW! What really concerned me too was I could not locate samples of their work!

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