The complaint has been investigated and
resolved to the customer's satisfaction
Resolved
Big Break , Oakley ,Ca - East Bay Regional ParksEast Bay Regional Parks

Well East Bay Regional Parks " According to Contra Costa Times Like we said You own Big Break

Clean Up your back yard, Your Staff has already admitted you have removed some of the hazards

In fact your Chief Mrs . Althoff told reporters just that, However a victim received a letter from

East bay Regional Parks telling won of the victims they do not own big break !! Bold Face Lie !!

Guess we will have to let a jury decide guess East Bay Regional Parks forgot about Pat O Brien

whom was the purchase Agent and sealed the deal back in 1998 . Don't Play Games with

peoples lives Pat O Brien, and your Mickey Mouse Risk management team trying to threaten

the victims with a law suit if they don't back off or serve you clowns with a summons to awnser

up . No won is above the law and you might find your self in criminal court as well for abuse

under the color of authority City Council members including the Mayor also can be recalled .

We can start working on that asap !! You have no right to be in office if you turn back on the

people that put you their ... We sign your pay check and don't forget that .

What may be today may not be tomorrow when you start trying to Lie and cover up things

It all comes out in the wash ... When you were sworn in as a officer do not forget what

you said, Say what you do Do what you say !!


News On Big Break And East Bay Regional Parks :


Delta hazards pose problems for boaters, law enforcement
By Jonathan Lockett
CONTRA COSTA TIMES
Posted: 10/10/2009 12:20:39 PM PDT
Updated: 10/10/2009 05:32:21 PM PDT

The Delta is one of the Bay Area's most stunning natural habitats, but hidden among that beauty are some hazards that can spell trouble for boaters.

Boating up Fishermans Cut north of Bethel Island, shipwrecked boats line both sides of the bank. Dilapidated portable classrooms gathering algae lie partially submerged among an old tugboat.

Abandoned and sunken boats are common in the Delta, but boaters often are unaware of them, putting them at risk of collisions. Charts show where the dangers are, but boaters often don't buy the charts because they're not available at many marinas, according to Lt. Will Duke of the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Marine Services Patrol.

"We've had several cases of people striking sunken boats, " Duke said. "The problem is, not every boater consults a nautical chart. If you look at the navigational charts — not maps from marinas — they tell you that there are shipwrecks and pilings and to stay out."

This summer the Marine Services Patrol responded to three accidents in the Delta involving boats colliding with shipwrecks or hidden pilings — two in Big Break and one in False River near Fishermans Cut. Two of the accidents resulted in shipwrecks, but there were no injuries.

Big Break, a popular fishing area near Oakley, contains several pilings and shipwrecks. There are no warning signs about the dangers, but some of the hazards are marked with buoys.

Michael
Advertisement
Espinosa, a resident of Arbuckle, Colusa County, hit a piling in broad daylight while fishing with family members in Big Break in August. The boat, which was carrying four children, sank.

Espinosa said the piling wasn't marked and the map he bought from a marina didn't indicate it.

"Being from out of town, " Espinosa said, "we rely on the marinas to buy a map, and none of those hazards are on that map."

After the accident, Espinosa wrote letters to several agencies and was told he should have consulted a navigational chart. Espinosa later found a chart at a West Marine nautical supplies store in Pittsburg.

Charts also can be downloaded from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Coast Survey Web site.

Big Break is owned by the East Bay Regional Park District, and Espinosa believes Oakley and county officials should join with the district to better mark hazards in the area.

The park district has removed some pilings that are close to the shoreline, said Diane Althoff, the district's chief of design and construction. Sunken boats and pilings, however, have been left alone along the entrance to the area.

"If the state brought some hazards to our attention, we would have to address that, " she said.

The county has tried to eliminate some of the hazards.

The sheriff's office has participated in the Department of Boating and Waterways' Abandoned Watercraft and Abatement Program, or AWAP, since its inception in 1997. The program was instituted to enhance safety on the state's waterways.

The county has spent more than $1 million from AWAP grants to date, including nearly $100, 000 this year to remove 45 shipwrecks. Contra Costa County requests more money than any other county in California, Duke said.

Still, counties could use more money to safeguard waterways.

"What we know is the program is underfunded, " Duke said.

A statewide survey conducted by the sheriff's office to learn the extent of the problem estimated the cost of removing derelict boats from state waterways at more than $1 million, Duke said.

Reach Jonathan Lockett at [protected].
finding hazards
Nautical charts can be obtained at West Marine, 4645 Century Blvd., Pittsburg. They also are available online from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Coast Survey site at www.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov

Sherry LaVars/Staff
Anglers try their luck near pilings and an abandoned boat Wednesday near Big Break in Oakley. Such hazards have caused accidents.

Sherry LaVars/Staff
Lt. Will Duke of the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Marine Services Patrol on Wednesday points out an abandoned vessel in the Delta.


Delta hazards pose problems for boaters, law enforcement
By Jonathan Lockett
CONTRA COSTA TIMES
Posted: 10/10/2009 12:20:39 PM PDT
Updated: 10/10/2009 05:32:21 PM PDT

The Delta is one of the Bay Area's most stunning natural habitats, but hidden among that beauty are some hazards that can spell trouble for boaters.

Boating up Fishermans Cut north of Bethel Island, shipwrecked boats line both sides of the bank. Dilapidated portable classrooms gathering algae lie partially submerged among an old tugboat.

Abandoned and sunken boats are common in the Delta, but boaters often are unaware of them, putting them at risk of collisions. Charts show where the dangers are, but boaters often don't buy the charts because they're not available at many marinas, according to Lt. Will Duke of the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Marine Services Patrol.

"We've had several cases of people striking sunken boats, " Duke said. "The problem is, not every boater consults a nautical chart. If you look at the navigational charts — not maps from marinas — they tell you that there are shipwrecks and pilings and to stay out."

This summer the Marine Services Patrol responded to three accidents in the Delta involving boats colliding with shipwrecks or hidden pilings — two in Big Break and one in False River near Fishermans Cut. Two of the accidents resulted in shipwrecks, but there were no injuries.

Big Break, a popular fishing area near Oakley, contains several pilings and shipwrecks. There are no warning signs about the dangers, but some of the hazards are marked with buoys.

Michael
Advertisement
Espinosa, a resident of Arbuckle, Colusa County, hit a piling in broad daylight while fishing with family members in Big Break in August. The boat, which was carrying four children, sank.

Espinosa said the piling wasn't marked and the map he bought from a marina didn't indicate it.

"Being from out of town, " Espinosa said, "we rely on the marinas to buy a map, and none of those hazards are on that map."

After the accident, Espinosa wrote letters to several agencies and was told he should have consulted a navigational chart. Espinosa later found a chart at a West Marine nautical supplies store in Pittsburg.

Charts also can be downloaded from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Coast Survey Web site.

Big Break is owned by the East Bay Regional Park District, and Espinosa believes Oakley and county officials should join with the district to better mark hazards in the area.

The park district has removed some pilings that are close to the shoreline, said Diane Althoff, the district's chief of design and construction. Sunken boats and pilings, however, have been left alone along the entrance to the area.

"If the state brought some hazards to our attention, we would have to address that, " she said.

The county has tried to eliminate some of the hazards.

The sheriff's office has participated in the Department of Boating and Waterways' Abandoned Watercraft and Abatement Program, or AWAP, since its inception in 1997. The program was instituted to enhance safety on the state's waterways.

The county has spent more than $1 million from AWAP grants to date, including nearly $100, 000 this year to remove 45 shipwrecks. Contra Costa County requests more money than any other county in California, Duke said.

Still, counties could use more money to safeguard waterways.

"What we know is the program is underfunded, " Duke said.

A statewide survey conducted by the sheriff's office to learn the extent of the problem estimated the cost of removing derelict boats from state waterways at more than $1 million, Duke said.

Reach Jonathan Lockett at [protected].
finding hazards
Nautical charts can be obtained at West Marine, 4645 Century Blvd., Pittsburg. They also are available online from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Coast Survey site at www.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov

Sherry LaVars/Staff
Anglers try their luck near pilings and an abandoned boat Wednesday near Big Break in Oakley. Such hazards have caused accidents.

Sherry LaVars/Staff
Lt. Will Duke of the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Marine Services Patrol on Wednesday points out an abandoned vessel in the Delta.

Delta hazards pose problems for boaters, law enforcement
By Jonathan Lockett
CONTRA COSTA TIMES
Posted: 10/10/2009 12:20:39 PM PDT
Updated: 10/10/2009 05:32:21 PM PDT

The Delta is one of the Bay Area's most stunning natural habitats, but hidden among that beauty are some hazards that can spell trouble for boaters.

Boating up Fishermans Cut north of Bethel Island, shipwrecked boats line both sides of the bank. Dilapidated portable classrooms gathering algae lie partially submerged among an old tugboat.

Abandoned and sunken boats are common in the Delta, but boaters often are unaware of them, putting them at risk of collisions. Charts show where the dangers are, but boaters often don't buy the charts because they're not available at many marinas, according to Lt. Will Duke of the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Marine Services Patrol.

"We've had several cases of people striking sunken boats, " Duke said. "The problem is, not every boater consults a nautical chart. If you look at the navigational charts — not maps from marinas — they tell you that there are shipwrecks and pilings and to stay out."

This summer the Marine Services Patrol responded to three accidents in the Delta involving boats colliding with shipwrecks or hidden pilings — two in Big Break and one in False River near Fishermans Cut. Two of the accidents resulted in shipwrecks, but there were no injuries.

Big Break, a popular fishing area near Oakley, contains several pilings and shipwrecks. There are no warning signs about the dangers, but some of the hazards are marked with buoys.


Espinosa, a resident of Arbuckle, Colusa County, hit a piling in broad daylight while fishing with family members in Big Break in August. The boat, which was carrying four children, sank.

Espinosa said the piling wasn't marked and the map he bought from a marina didn't indicate it.

"Being from out of town, " Espinosa said, "we rely on the marinas to buy a map, and none of those hazards are on that map."

After the accident, Espinosa wrote letters to several agencies and was told he should have consulted a navigational chart. Espinosa later found a chart at a West Marine nautical supplies store in Pittsburg.

Charts also can be downloaded from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Coast Survey Web site.

Big Break is owned by the East Bay Regional Park District, and Espinosa believes Oakley and county officials should join with the district to better mark hazards in the area.

The park district has removed some pilings that are close to the shoreline, said Diane Althoff, the district's chief of design and construction. Sunken boats and pilings, however, have been left alone along the entrance to the area.

"If the state brought some hazards to our attention, we would have to address that, " she said.

The county has tried to eliminate some of the hazards.

The sheriff's office has participated in the Department of Boating and Waterways' Abandoned Watercraft and Abatement Program, or AWAP, since its inception in 1997. The program was instituted to enhance safety on the state's waterways.

The county has spent more than $1 million from AWAP grants to date, including nearly $100, 000 this year to remove 45 shipwrecks. Contra Costa County requests more money than any other county in California, Duke said.

Still, counties could use more money to safeguard waterways.

"What we know is the program is underfunded, " Duke said.

A statewide survey conducted by the sheriff's office to learn the extent of the problem estimated the cost of removing derelict boats from state waterways at more than $1 million, Duke said.

Reach Jonathan Lockett at [protected].
finding hazards
Nautical charts can be obtained at West Marine, 4645 Century Blvd., Pittsburg. They also are available online from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Coast Survey site at www.nauticalcharts.noaa.gov

Sherry LaVars/Staff
Anglers try their luck near pilings and an abandoned boat Wednesday near Big Break in Oakley. Such hazards have caused accidents.

Sherry LaVars/Staff
Lt. Will Duke of the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Marine Services Patrol on Wednesday points out an abandoned vessel in the Delta.

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